Are there sects and divisions within Judaism?

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In Judaism
First of all, it should be stressed that all Jews have the same Torah.

Jews may be classed according to lifestyle, geography, or outlook.

Lifestyle: there are Jews who are more stringent (Orthodox) or less stringent (Conservative, Reform) in their observance of the Torah's commands.
Orthodox Jews believe that the Torah must be fully observed (Deuteronomy 13:5). They keep the laws of Judaism as codified in the Shulchan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law), which lists the laws of the Torah and Talmud. Torah-study is seen as very important (Deuteronomy 5:1); and the modern world is seen as subservient to the Torah (Talmud, Nedarim 32a), not the other way around.
Other Jewish groups (Conservative, Reform) adapt, curtail or change the Torah-laws in contemporary life, to a greater or lesser degree.
Geography: there are Ashkenazi (Western) Jews and Sephardi/Mizrahi (Eastern) Jews. In Medieval times, the Ashkenazim were in France and Germany, the Sephardim were in pre-expulsion Spain, and the Mizrahi (Edot Hamizrach) were in North Africa, Turkey and Iraq. (There are others too, such as Yemeni and Romaniote (Greek Jews), but the above are the largest groups.)

Outlook: among the religious Jewish communities, there are the Yeshiva (Litvish) community, Hassidim, and Modern Orthodox. (Hassidim are the ones who wear long frock-coats.)
Yes, there are sects in Judaism. The three main sects in America are the Orthodox, the Conservative, and the Reform. There are blends and variations; and the old saying, "two Jews, three opinions" applies here.
Answer 2
All Jews have the same Torah.
Torah-observant Judaism dates back for a few thousand years. Originally it was simply called "Torah" or living by the Torah. Today it has the additional name of Orthodox Judaism.Orthodox Jews believe that the Torah must be fully observed (Deuteronomy 13:5). They keep the laws of Judaism as codified in the Shulchan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law), which lists the laws of the Torah and Talmud. Torah-study is seen as very important (Deuteronomy 5:1); and the modern world is seen as subservient to the Torah (Talmud, Nedarim 32a), not the other way around.
Other Jewish groups (Conservative, Reform) are recent. They adapt, curtail or change the Torah-laws in contemporary life, to a greater or lesser degree.


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What is the main sect of Judaism?

Orthodox is the most traditional. Reform is the largest. But thereis no one denomination that can be called "the main sect". All ofthe denominations of Judaism are tied together (despite theopinions of some). For example, Reform Jews who keep kosher dependon Orthodox butchers. Orthodox communities within large Reformcommunities must interact with Reform Jews in community basedsituations such as local Jewish newspapers and some events.

What are the divisions within Buddhism?

Answer . Theravada and Mahayana. Within Mahayana, you find Zen Buddhism. . Answer: . Theravada ('way of the elders') is more similar to original Buddhism, whereas Mahayana ('greater vehicle') has an unknown origin.

Are the Amish a sub-sect of Judaism?

No, they are Christians who believe in Jesus Christ as Lord andSaviour who has already been on earth, which is quite differentfrom Jewish beliefs. From a historic perspective, all Christians churches (includingAmish) had their earliest origin in Judaism, from which theredeveloped Catholicism, which in turn later gave rise toProtestantism and the other Christian denominations. The Amishseparated itself from the Mennonite (which separated itself fromthe Vatican regarding infant baptism). Mennonite was born followingMartin Luther's reformation movement. Luther was a German Catholicpriest who posted the 95 theses of Convention at his church's doorin Germany in 1517, "protesting" against the Vatican. Answer 2: The Amish are descendants of a group of 17th-century Anabaptists.Their name derives from their leader, Jacob Amman, who lived inSwitzerland. From their study of the Bible back then, theseGod-fearing people recognized that infant baptism and militaryservice were wrong. Because of their stand, the governmentpersecuted them. A few even paid for their religious convictionwith their lives. Persecution continued to increase, and a numberof them were forced to flee to other parts of Switzerland and toFrance. By the middle of the 19th century, thousands had fled tothe United States. With them, they brought their culture and theSwiss German dialect.

What are the main sects of Judaism?

Answer: . Denominations of Judaism: Jewish movements, often referred to as denominations, branches or sects of Judaism, differ from each other in some beliefs and thus in the way they observe Judaism. Differences between Jewish movements, in contrast to differences between Christian denominations, derive from interpreting Jewish scriptures in more progressive/liberal or more traditional/conservative ways rather then from theological differences. 1. Orthodox Judaism: Orthodox Jews believe that God gave Moses the whole Torah (Written and Oral) at Mount Sinai. Orthodox Jews believe that the Torah contains 613 mitzvot (commandments) that are binding upon Jews. Modern Orthodox Jews strictly observe halakhah (Jewish Law), but still integrate into modern society. Ultra-Orthodox Jews, which includes Chasidic Jews, strictly observe Jewish laws and do not integrate into modern society by dressing distinctively and living separately. 2. Conservative Judaism: Conservative Judaism maintains that the ideas in the Torah come from God, but were transmitted by humans and contain a human compontent. Conservative Judaism generally accepts the binding nature of halakhah (Jewish Law), but believes that the Law should adapt, absorbing aspects of the predominant culture while remaining true to Judaism's values. 3. Reform Judaism: Reform Judaism believes that the Torah was written by different human sources, rather than by God, and then later combined. While Reform Judaism does not accept the binding nature of halakhah (Jewish Law), the movement does retain much of the values and ethics of Judaism as well as some of the practices and culture. 4. Reconstructionist Judaism: Reconstructionists believe that Judaism is an "evolving religious civilization." In one way it is more liberal than Reform Judaism - the movement does not believe in a personified deity that is active in history and does not believe that God chose the Jewish people. In another way Reconstructionist Judaism is less liberal than Reform Judaism - Reconstructionists may observe Jewish Law, not because it is a binding Law from God, but because it is a valuable cultural remnant. 5. Humanistic Judaism: Humanistic Judaism, founded in 1963 in Detroit, Michigan by Rabbi Sherwin T. Wine, offers a nontheistic alternative in contemporary Jewish life. Humanistic Jews believe in creating a meaningful Jewish lifestyle free from supernatural authority, in achieving dignity and self-esteem, and in reviving the secular roots of Judaism. Humanistic Judaism embraces a human-centered philosophy that combines the celebration of Jewish culture and identity with adherence to humanistic values.. There are many denominations within Judaism, and the major denominations vary by country: . In North America there are 4: Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionist. . In the UK there are 4: Orthodox, Masorti, Reform, and Liberal/Progressive. . In Ireland there are 2: Orthodox and Progressive. . In Israel there is 1: Orthodox (although other denominiations are now starting to gain acceptance1). Chassidic Orthodox Conservative Reform Reconstructionist

What are the divisions within judaism?

Judaism has only two major sects. However, they have very differentperceptions of each other and these are the Torah Jews and the LiberalJews. The main divisions between these sects is the ability to usenon-Judaic source content to abrogate and modernize Jewish teaching andpractice. Torah Jews believe that such things represent a deteriorationof Jewish identity and purpose whereas Liberal Jews see Jewish Identityto be more internal or ethnic and the religious aspect to be secondary.As a result, Torah Jews believe Liberal Jews to have "lost their way"and Liberal Jews see Torah Jews as being antiquated and "out of sync"with the modern world. Regardless of whether a person is a Torah Jew or aLiberal Jew, that person may also practice rites derivative of hisancestral region such as Eastern European customs, Iberian customs,North African customs, etc. These customs do not affect other Jews asperceiving him as Jewish and these rites are all co-equal. Within the Torah Judaism Sect there are a number of movementsdistinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World,their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. The ModernOrthodox are typically seen as the more liberal branch of Torah Judaismand typically wear Jewish paraphernalia (such as a Kippa and Tzitzit)although they will dress in a typical business-suit and work in Westerncompanies. On the more conservative side are the Hasidim andUltra-Orthodox who wear unique vestment at all times and arerecognizable by their payyot (sideburn-curls). Within LiberalJudaism there are a number of movements also distinguished by theirlevel of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer,and their level of conservatism. At the most liberal are Secular Jewswho may make Jewish foods and sing Jewish songs, but rarely attendsynagogue services and do not perform the daily acts required of TorahJews. In Liberal Judaism there is a question as to how much Hebrew andhow much Vernacular should be used in a Synagogue Service. ConservativeJews, on the more conservative side typically prefer more Hebrew,whereas Reform Jews prefer more Vernacular. Liberal Jews are oftenwell-acclimated to non-Jewish society and may have many non-Jewishfriends and contacts. First of all, it should be stressed that all Jews have the same Torah. . Jews may be classed according to lifestyle, geography, or outlook. Lifestyle : there are Jews who are more stringent (Orthodox) or less stringent (Conservative, Reform) in their observance of the Torah's commands. Geography: there are Ashkenazi (Western) Jews and Sephardi (Eastern) Jews. Ashkenazim have historical roots in Germany, while Sephardim have historical roots in pre-expulsion Spain. (There are others too, such as Yemeni, Romaniote, and Persian Jews, but the above are the largest groups.) Outlook: among the religious Jewish communities, there are the Yeshiva ("Litvish") community, Hassidim, and Modern Orthodox. (Hassidim are the ones who wear long frock-coats.).

What are the different sects of Judaism?

There were 4 main sects of Judaism at the end of the Temple period(70 CE): . the Pharisees . the Sadducees . the Essenes . the Nazarenes Modern Rabbinic Judaism grew out of the Pharisees. In modern times,there are several denominations within Judaism, including . Orthodox . Conservative . Reform . Reconstructionist . Renewal . Humanist . Masorti . Progressive . Liberal Even among the Orthodox, which is the most traditional, there arethese distinctions: . Ultra-Orthodox/Hassidic . Modern Orthodox . Haredi . and Chabad (which is actually an organization, but which doesnot strictly fall within the definitions of Ultra-Orthodox orModern Orthodox There are also ethnic subdivisions: . Ashkenazic . Sefardic . Beta Yisra'el . Mizrahi

What is a sect?

sects are religious or political groups. Alida is a central figure in the "Pure Land" sects of Buddhism.

If there are 3 forms of Judaism were do the other sects come from?

There are not three sects of Judaism. It is just that three movements of Judaism: Orthodoxy, Conservatism, and Reform are the most dominant movements in Judaism. The others merely command fewer followers.

What are the divisions within Sikhism?

There are no divisions within Sikhism. Sikhism was formed with the idea of uniting all the divisions. That's why all Sikhs have the tile as 'SINGH' and all the ladies have the title as 'KAUR'

What are the different sects in Judaism?

As with any religion, Judaism is split between the left, right and everywhere in between. The reform and conservative Jews sit on the left, don't necessarily take all the laws etc literally and favor a more modern approach. In the middle sit the 'regular' Jews, the modern orthodox through to orthodox. They typically keep all the laws, attend the synagogue, learn the Torah etc though at the same time, live in the modern world and fit their religion into the world. On the right you have the ultra-orthodox, the Chassidish sects who seek to preserve their heritage more. They may typically wear the traditional garb of the Eastern European Jews; long coats, black hats etc. They seek to keep the tradition as it was for hundreds of years. Many of these people learn in kollel , a house of study for married men. They belive that we were put on this earth to study the ways of Hashem , and his laws. They are usually very refined, down to earth people, in keeping with the commandments of Hashem. Don't have any resentment on Jews who study all day. All lawyers out there, who have never seen a page of Gemara (Part of the Jewish law), they are missing something amazing. The gedolim (great leaders of our generation in Torah) know about world events, you can have talks with them about current events. If you are the intelectual type, they will be more than happy to talk to you about religion, G-d, or whatever you wish to talk about. Philisophical? Try reading the Kuzeri by Rebbi Yehudah HaChasid. Great Torah scholars have written books on hot topics, such as human cloning. Note: In this article, when reffering to Ultra-Orthodox, we don't meen the ones who throw rocks at cars on Shabbath in Israel. They are misguided. They are going against the laws in the Torah. They are an embarresment to the Jewish nation.

Identify the four sects of Judaism?

In fact there are a number of movements within Judaism. The three main ones are: Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform.. Within Orthodox Judaism there are several 'sects', and while of course all Jews share the same core beliefs, the groups may disagree passionately on other issues. Judaism as a religion has always encouraged debate and discussion.. There is also Progressive Judaism and Reconstructionist Judaism, but these are not as large or influential as the three major movements outlined at the start of this answer. And the groups/movements are 'fluid' in that any Jew can walk into any Synagogue, in any country, and immediately feel at home, even if they are not part of that particular movement..

What are the major divisions of Judaism?

Orthodox, Conservative, Liberal, and Reform. However, the different sects of Judaism differ primarily in levels of observance of halacha and mitzvot, they're not splits in the sense of other religions.

Who are the two opposing sects within Islam?

sunni and shi'ite. these two sects didnt stem as opposing. there shouldn't be generalisations about them being opposed, but rather the narrowing down on the groups within these sects, and putting the focus on the minority that want to cause trouble.

What are three major divisions within modern Judaism?

Judaism has only two major sects. Most Americans are familiar with three movements: Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform. However each of these is a subset of the two major sects. (Orthodox is subset of Torah Judaism and Conservative and Reform are subsets of Liberal Judaism.) The two sects have very different perceptions of each other. The main divisions between these sects is the ability to use non-Judaic source content to abrogate and modernize Jewish teaching and practice. Torah Jews believe that such things represent a deterioration of Jewish identity and purpose whereas Liberal Jews see Jewish Identity to be more internal or ethnic and the religious aspect to be secondary. As a result, Torah Jews believe Liberal Jews to have "lost their way" and Liberal Jews see Torah Jews as being antiquated and "out of sync" with the modern world. Regardless of whether a person is a Torah Jew or a Liberal Jew, that person may also practice rites derivative of his ancestral region such as Eastern European customs, Iberian customs, North African customs, etc. These customs do not affect other Jews as perceiving him as Jewish and these rites are all co-equal. Within the Torah Judaism Sect there are a number of movements distinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. The Modern Orthodox are typically seen as the more liberal branch of Torah Judaism and typically wear Jewish paraphernalia (such as a Kippa and Tzitzit) although they will dress in a typical business-suit and work in Western companies. On the more conservative side are the Hasidim and Ultra-Orthodox who wear unique vestment at all times and are recognizable by their payyot (sideburn-curls). Within Liberal Judaism there are a number of movements also distinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. At the most liberal are Secular Jews who may make Jewish foods and sing Jewish songs, but rarely attend synagogue services and do not perform the daily acts required of Torah Jews. In Liberal Judaism there is a question as to how much Hebrew and how much Vernacular should be used in a Synagogue Service. Conservative Jews, on the more conservative side typically prefer more Hebrew, whereas Reform Jews prefer more Vernacular. Liberal Jews are often well-acclimated to non-Jewish society and may have many non-Jewish friends and contacts.

What were the three sects of judaism?

Judaism is divided into Sephardim & Ashkenaz. Ashkenaz are divided into Orthodox, Conservative, & Reform. A forth sect is called Reconstructionist.

How many sects are there in Judaism?

Judaism has only two major sects. However, they have very different perceptions of each other and these are the Torah Jews and the Liberal Jews. The main divisions between these sects is the ability to use non-Judaic source content to abrogate and modernize Jewish teaching and practice. Torah Jews believe that such things represent a deterioration of Jewish identity and purpose whereas Liberal Jews see Jewish Identity to be more internal or ethnic and the religious aspect to be secondary. As a result, Torah Jews believe Liberal Jews to have "lost their way" and Liberal Jews see Torah Jews as being antiquated and "out of sync" with the modern world. Regardless of whether a person is a Torah Jew or a Liberal Jew, that person may also practice rites derivative of his ancestral region such as Eastern European customs, Iberian customs, North African customs, etc. These customs do not affect other Jews as perceiving him as Jewish and these rites are all co-equal. Within the Torah Judaism Sect there are a number of movements distinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. The Modern Orthodox are typically seen as the more liberal branch of Torah Judaism and typically wear Jewish paraphernalia (such as a Kippa and Tzitzit) although they will dress in a typical business-suit and work in Western companies. On the more conservative side are the Hasidim and Ultra-Orthodox who wear unique vestment at all times and are recognizable by their payyot (sideburn-curls). Within Liberal Judaism there are a number of movements also distinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. At the most liberal are Secular Jews who may make Jewish foods and sing Jewish songs, but rarely attend synagogue services and do not perform the daily acts required of Torah Jews. In Liberal Judaism there is a question as to how much Hebrew and how much Vernacular should be used in a Synagogue Service. Conservative Jews, on the more conservative side typically prefer more Hebrew, whereas Reform Jews prefer more Vernacular. Liberal Jews are often well-acclimated to non-Jewish society and may have many non-Jewish friends and contacts.

What is one of the main sects of Judaism?

Orthodox is the most traditional. Reform is the largest. But there is no one denomination that can be called "the main sect". All of the denominations of Judaism are tied together (despite the opinions of some traditional Jews). For example, Reform Jews who keep kosher depend on Orthodox butchers. Orthodox communities within large Reform communities must interact with Reform Jews in community based situations such as local Jewish newspapers and some events.

How do the sects of Judaism differ?

The different sects of Judaism differ in many different ways,. mainly though they differ in the way halacha ( code of law ). is interpreted.

What are the two divisions of Judaism?

The main movements within Judaism are: Orthodox (very religious), Conservative (traditional, but less rigid than Orthodox) and Reform (the most liberal of the three). All Jews share the same core beliefs, though, whichever movement they belong to. And any Jew can walk into any Synagogue in the world, and feel at home and understand what is going on.

What are the sects within islam?

The two major sects of Islam are Sunni Islam and Shia Islam. Within each of these sects are a group of mystics known as Sufis, who focus less on doctrine and law and more on spirituality and getting closer to God. Within Shi'ism are three major divisions, each believing in a different amount of rightful Imams after Ali ibn Abi Talib (RA). Isma'ili Shias believe that there were only seven Imams, with the last being Isma'il, the eldest son of Ja'far (the sixth Imam). The Ja'fari Shi'as, the most common group, believe that there are Twelve Imams (often called Twelvers), and the last one, Mohammad Al-Mehdi, went into hiding and will return with Jesus marking the end of the world. Zaidi Shi'as believe there were five Imams, with Zayd bin Ali (Ali ibn Abi Talib's great-grandson) being the fifth. Sunni Islam is one sect, but within it, there are different madh'habs, or schools of jurisprudence. The only differences between them is the way they interpret certain doctrine and laws, but the beliefs of all madh'habs are the same, and they are not considered different sects, as people don't have to associate with a certain madh'hab. There is also another group, called the Khawarij, or Ibadis, present mainly in present-day Oman. This group approves of the first two Caliphs of Islam, Abu Bakr and Omar, referring to them as the "Two Rightly Guided Caliphs" (vs. the four for Sunnis). They originate after Hasan ibn Ali made an agreement with Mu'awiyah ibn Abi Sufyan, complaining that the Imam (leader) must be spiritually pure, and the agreement was a compromise of his spiritual purity, therefore a compromise of his legitimacy as Caliph. Refer to the link to the image below, which is a diagram detailing all the branches of the Islamic religion.

Why one would call Christianity a sect within Judaism?

Originally, Cristianity was started as a sect of Judaism. As time went on they split away, having nothing to do with the Jews. Nowadays, it can't be considered a sect of Judaism, but at one point it was. That was its pull. That's why so many Jews were sucked in.

Was Christianity a sect of Judaism?

Answer 1 - Christian: No. Christianity was a progression of Judaism. In the Old Testament (Hebrew Scriptures) there were predictions of a coming Messiah and a New Covenant. Then in the fullness of time God sent His Son, Jesus the Christ or Jesus the Messiah into the world. Jesus came to earth for one reason mainly and that was to die on the cross of Calvary to save people from their sins. When Jesus died and was resurrected three days later this brought forth the New Covenant. Judaism and the law was the Old Covenant, Grace came by the New Covenant. "Grace is what God may be free to do, and indeed what He does, accordingly, for the lost after Christ has died on behalf of them." This grace was first presented to the Jews, but after most of them rejected Jesus as the Messiah, God presented Jesus to the Gentiles. Christianity is made up of a few Jewish persons and many Gentiles. The Bible, God's word tells us that the time is coming when once again Jesus will be presented to the Jews and the remnant that is left after the Great Tribulation period will accept Him as their Messiah. More Information on this View: Judaism today is distinctly different from Christianity. But God has not intended this to remain so. Firstly Judaism was intended to progress to the point of accepting Jesus as Messiah. I think if a comprehensive reading of the book of Romans is taken up you will come to the conclusion that Jesus was presented to the Jews first and then after their rejection of the Messiah, Jesus Christ He was offered to the Gentiles. God in the book of Jeremiah told of the "New Covenant" that He was going to make with the Jewish people (Jeremiah 31:31) Also in isaiah 55:3 God talks about an everlasting Covenant, and this also pertains to the "New Covenant" through the Davidic Covenant that says that a son of David will always sit on David's throne. Jesus Christ is the Son, the ultimate Son that will sit on Davids throne. The Jews have missed this the first time around, but will accept Jesus Christ as their true Messiah after the Great Tribulation. The religion that the Jews follow today is a hodge-podge of their own making and most do not even follow the Law of Moses, which by the way was done away with when Christ died and was resurrected and then further by the destruction of the Temple in 70 A.D. Galatians 3:28-29, "There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female ; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you are Christ's then you are Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise." Ephesians 2:14-18, " For he Himself is our peace, who has made both one, and has broken down the middle wall of separation, having abolished in His flesh the enmity, that is the law of commandments contained in ordinances, so as to create in Himself one new man from the two, thus making peace, and that he might reconcile them both to God on one body through the cross, thereby putting to death the enmity......." The Jewish people should have progressed toward what is called True Christianity, but did not because of their disbelief (Which is another story in itself). Please read the full Book of Romans. The Jewish people have clearly gotten away from the Old testament Scriptures, a thing that they repeated over and over in Jewish history. You know this and I know this.To know God's truth you have to read what God has said and believe it. They don't even need a New Testament to accomplish this. All the ceremonial requirements of the Mosaic law were fulfilled in Christ and Christians are not required to observe them, yet not one jot or tittle was erased. Answer 2 - Jewish Jewish answer: Yes. Initially, the Christians considered themselves the Jews who accepted Jesus as the Messiah. However, as the theology of Christianity developed in the first centuries C.E., they increasingly moved away from traditional Jewish theology to the point where Christianity was a clearly distinct religion from Judaism. As for the New Covenant, Jews see this as a Christian invention, especially as concerns the Epistles of Paul. This is because Paul did not ever meet Jesus and expounded on a number of doctrines that actually went counter to Jesus' arguments in the Gospels (such as "not a jot or tittle of the old law is to be replace").

How did Christianity grow from a sect of judaism into a world religion?

It did not grow from a sect of Judaism,, Jesus was born a Jew and He was also the Son of the Most High God, He it was who started the religion of the new testament and He said, 'This is my church and the gates of Hell shall not prevail against it' - This is wrong whoever wrote it. I am not quite sure what the exact answer is yet, but I know it is wrong.

What are four major divisions within modern judaism?

In North America, the four major denominations are Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionist. In England: Orthodox, Masorti, Reform, and Liberal. In Ireland: there are only two major groups: Orthodox and Progressive.

How did Jesus create a division from Judaism?

Answer There was no division of Christians from Judaism during the time attributed to Jesus, or for some decades afterwards. The final split seems to have come in the 90s of the first century CE, when Christians were barred from attending the synagogues. The principal reason appears to be that the Christians had begun to blame the Jews for the death of Jesus - even Jews who were not present in Jerusalem or who were not even alive at the time.

What are the different sect of Judaism?

Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform are the three major sects of Judaism. There are other smaller groups.

Divisions within world religions?

the divisions are just relevant to the faith issues between one and his/her God (Creator). however, all religions are having same common morals that is relevant to people relationships.

Why is David such an important figure within Judaism?

Biblical tradition says that David created a great empire and thatIsrael became an important regional power in his time. Althougharchaeologists now cast doubt on those claims, the story of Davidprovides a sense of pride in a legendary past. Jewish answer: 1) King David authored/compiled the book of Psalms and gave it tous in its present form (Talmud, Bava Batra 14b). The Psalms(Tehillim), which we might call the soul of the Jewish people,express the yearning of King David and of the entire nation to beclose to God. They are one of the foundations of our prayerbook tothis day. 2) King David was the one who finally succeeded in subduing all ofthe surrounding nations (see 2 Samuel ch.8 and ch.10) plus theentire territory of Israel, something which no one else didpreviously or subsequently. He succeeded in all his endeavors (1Samuel 16:18). 3) He secured from the prophet Nathan a promise from God that his(David's) son Solomon would build the Holy Temple (2 Samuel ch.7).The First Temple is actually considered the accomplishment of Davidhimself (Rashi commentary, Berakhot 18a), since it existed in hismerit (Sefer Torat Chaim, commenting on Talmud, Shabbat 30a). 4) He set the blueprints, with Divine inspiration, for the HolyTemple (1 Chronicles 28:19). Together with the prophet Samuel, helocated the spot where the Temple would be built (Talmud, Zevachim54b); and he dug the foundations for the Temple (Talmud, Sukkah53a). 5) He amassed vast amounts of material and precious metals for theconstruction of the Temple (1 Chronicles ch.29). 6) Together with Samuel, he instituted the 24 groupings of familiesof Kohanim and Levites (Talmud, Taanit 27a). 7) He served God all the days of his life (1 Kings 11:38); and Godwas with him (1 Samuel 16:18). 8) He was without peer in clarifying and applying the halakhot(laws) of the Oral Tradition (Talmud, Sanhedrin 93b). 9) King David serves as the archetype of the effectiveness ofrepentance (Talmud, Avodah Zarah 4b).

Is humanistic judaism a recognized sect of the Jewish religion?

Humanistic Judaism is new as an organized group (it began in 1963), and while other non-orthodox sects refrain from officially condemning it, they generally do not see it as a religious denomination, but more of a social denomination. Due to the high rate of intermarriage, and the lax rules for conversion (in some cases non-existent), most individual Jews of other sects do not recognize humanistic Judaism as valid. Some Jewish sociologists believe that in a few generations, the members of humanistic Judaism won't even identify themselves with mainstrain Judaism.

How do the sects of judaism different on the concept of the messiah?

Orthodox denominations generally preserve the concept of a human messiah, whereas most Reform and some Conservative Jews regard the messiah as a symbol for a time of peace in the future.

Did Judaism begin as a sect or a church?

Judaism started with Abraham. And not a church. It shouldn't becalled a sect, because it made a complete break with what hadpreviously existed (a complete break with the surroundingidolatry).

What are the different groups within judaism?

Judaism is divided into 2 main geographic groupings: Ashkenazim & Sephardim. Ashkenazim are the ones that are subdivided into Orthodox, Conservative, Reconstructionist, Reform, & even Humanist Judaism. There also a few smaller Jewish sects besides Ashkenazim & Sephardim: Karaites & Samaritans.

What sects of Judaism have developed over time?

A long list. Among them: the idolaters during the First Temple period, the Sadducees, the Baitusim (Boethusians), the Nesinim, the apikursim and minim, the Karaites, the followers of Shabbetai Zevi and others of that type, Jewish communists (Yevsektsia), Yiddishists, Bundists, assimilationists, and more. The Samaritans may or may not have ever been Jewish in the past. Most of these breakaway groups were lost to history, while others (such as the Karaites) are moribund and remain only a shadow of their former selves.

What sect of Judaism did Jesus come from?

Based on the stories about Jesus in the Christian Bible, there are elements of both the Pharisee and Sadducee in his remarks and actions.

How many different denominations and sects within the Shia sect?

There are only 3 sects of shia. but only 12 Imam shia exist mainly and other nearly extincted. The three sects are: Zaydis (Fivers), Ismailis (Seveners), and Twelvers. ___________________________________________________________ . However, I don't tend to the naming of sects. You may call them different schools and teachings and not sects. All Shiite Muslims and Sunni Muslims believe in same God, read same Qur'an, pray facing same direction, practicing pilgrimage (or hajj) to same places, and fast same month of Ramadan. The differences between different Islam schools are minor differences that never related to main faith and beliefs. It is not like the different Christian denominations and sects. Shiite Muslims could be led in praying by a Sunnis Muslim and vice versa. They can pray in the masjid (or mosque) irrelevant to being related to Sunni or Shiites Muslims. All Muslims belong to one Islamic world. Nation of Islam is the only exception as it was originated in USA and abandoned basic true Islam beliefs and teachings. . Be careful that the Westerners are trying to widen the gap between Shiites and Sunni Muslims and to create conflicts among them only to allow themselves to have control on the resources of both of them.

Why had Judaism split into three distinct sects by the early first century?

There were three different sects in Judaism as a result ofdiffering views. The Jews were united on war to upheld the religionas a hold, but some followers believed in strict discipline, somefollowers were interested in social liberations, and some formedfollowers formed a mystical group.

What sects of Judaism have been created over time?

A long list. Among them: the Netinim, the idolaters during theFirst Temple period, the Hellenizers, the Sadducees, the Baitusim(Boethusians), the Essenes, the apikursim and minim, the Karaites,the followers of Shabbetai Zevi and other false messiahs, Jewishcommunists (Yevsektsia), Yiddishists, Bundists, assimilationists,and more. The Samaritans may or may not have ever been halakhically Jewish inthe distant past. Most of these breakaway groups were lost to history, while others(such as the Karaites) are moribund and remain only a shadow oftheir former selves.

Why was their a division in Islam into two sects?

Shia and Sunni have mostly same beliefs and both believe in fundamental beliefs of Islam. Today there is up to 260 sects in Islam that are in two main categories of shia and sunni. the conflict of shia and sunni has been always amplified by world Imperialism to prevent Islam from gaining power. Shia believes in Allah, prophet and all fundamentals of Islam. Shia pray 5 times a day but usually do the 2, 3 and 4, 5 pray together and so may seem they do only 3 pray a day. there is some differences in details of pray like genuflect (for shia should be on a stone or part of earth and for sunni on carpet or floor ). shia believe after death of prophet God selected the successive for prophet who is the political leader of Muslim community and people can not and does not the right to selected it. Shia believes the Caliph (Representative of God in earth) is selected only by God and can not be selected by people because God said in Koran: "Indeed, I will make upon the earth a successive authority" (Quran 2:30) or "O David! We did indeed make thee a vicegerent on earth" (Quran 38:26) also other verses. Shia believes such verses means only God can select an Islamic political leader (Caliph). In Shia Islam Caliphs after prophet are 12 Imams and all of them are the same and have no mistake and have the knowledge of everything (not absolute knowledge like knowledge of God) and they hear all sayings and even thinks of all humans after even after their death by permission of God and they are intermediates between God and human Shia Muslims always support them and forgive their lives for them. Shia Muslims do not consider selection of Abubakr as Caliph by people valid because God did not select him. They believe God ordered prophet to declare people that Ali is selected as successor of prophet and prophet did this mission many times during his prophet-hood and mainly in Ghadir event after last Hajj of his life at a 3-4 hour speech in front of 120,000 Muslims at Ghadir in hot desert after 2 days stop of long caravan for gathering and 3 days after speech for congratulations and homage of Muslims to Ali. Islam at that time had high power in world and Some companions had high interest in leadership position after prophet. Muslims knew that it is the final Hajj of prophet (predicted by prophet) and were going along with prophet to hear what prophet says at end of his life. Shia believes Ghadir event is the most important event of Islam and is mentioned in Koran in many verses like "Today" (اليوم) in verse 5:3 of Quran is the day of Ghadir. Or Verse 5:67 (O Messenger! proclaim the (message) which hath been sent to thee from thy Lord. If thou didst not, thou wouldst not have fulfilled and proclaimed His mission. And Allah will defend thee from men (who mean mischief). For Allah guideth not those who reject Faith) is revealed at Ghadir day and is about declaring political leadership of Ali after prophet. Both Sunni and Shia Muslims accept happening of Ghadir event But different interpret. Some Sunni writers tried to reject the event of Ghadir as declare of leadership of Ali and said at Ghadir prophet only wanted to say Ali is my friend and no one should bother him. Ali had 3 different missions to Yemen by prophet during 10 years and in 2 of them some companions of prophet had some conflicts with Ali and and prophet said some sayings about Ali to solve conflicts and some sunni writers have mixed stories of missions of Ali to Yemen with story of Ghadir to prove Ghadir event is not about Leadership of Ali and is not important. Shia scholars believe some Sunni writers have changed and deviated historical evidences about political leadership of Ali in old historical books and republished them to destroy evidences of leadership of Ali from old Sunni books. The famous Shia book Al-Ghadir (الغدير) by Allameh Amini is a collection of evidences and proofs for Ghadir Events written after referring to 100,000 Sunni books and full reading of 10,000 sunny books. Allameh Amini is a famous Shia scholar and spent 40 years of his life in travelling to access original old Sunni books in libraries in different countries to write this 20 volume book only from Sunni books and not using any Shia book. Some Sunni scholars tried to reply this book but then said if we want to reply this book we should first destroy all books of ourselves. Shia doctrine have root in Karbala tragedy. When tragedy of Karbala happened most of Iranians understood there is two different kinds of Islam and after happening of Karbala tragedy most of Iranians became followers of "Ahl al-Bayt" and forgive their lives for them like what they did in Iranian Revolution and Iran-Iraq War. Shia Muslims have at least 120,000 Hadith (saying) from The Fourteen Infallibles that is the base of Shia Islam along with Quran. Shia believes according to " Hadith of the two weighty things" The Fourteen Infallibles are the only valid interpreters of Quran and sayings of them are from God because they are Representative of God in earth and they do not say anything from themselves. Shia believes 12th of them (Mahdi) is alive and because people have killed all 11 Imams before him, he is in hide like Jesus and will come out of hide toghether with Jesus when people become ready and want to accept his leadership. All 11 Imams have been killed and during their life thy all have been in prison or under hard control of government to not have any political action. They never had enough serious followers to can get political power. Among them only the sixth Imam Ja'far al-Sadiq was relatively free in his life to have only scientific activities (but banned from any political action) and so only he is known in west because he established university and had students from all over the world. Westerns know him as a polymath: an astronomer, alchemist, Imam, Islamic scholar, Islamic theologian, writer, philosopher, physician, physicist and scientist. He was also the teacher of the famous chemist, Jābir ibn Hayyān (Geber), and of Abū Ḥanīfa, the founder of the Hanafi school of Sunni Islamic jurisprudence. He never wanted be a famous man and only shared his knowledge with who wanted to learn. Some researchers consider his teachings the root cause of renaissance. Sunni Muslims also accept Mahdi and his worldwide leadership as Caliph of God in earth at end of world. There is a famous Hadith from prophet Muhammad (PBUH) that Mahdi at hide is like sun behind cloud, he is hidden from people but people receive his benefits. Shia Muslims say some faithful believers have connection with Mahdi and use his knowledge. Shia Muslims believe that it is proved at least 1000 persons have had connection and talk with Mahdi during his hide period but Any one having relation with Mahdi keep it and does not declare it in public until is alive.

What are struggles within Judaism and Christianity?

Judaism has less struggles among it's believers than Christianity. Judaism, however has a longer history of persecution from others outside of the faith. Christianity is particularly difficult at times among its members. Their whole belief in Salvation is meant to include everyone. But it only supposedly applies to those who consciously accepts Jesus Christ as the Savior. This can be seen as a contradiction, sense many in the world do not have opportunities to learn about Jesus Christ. Judaism does not really subscribe to the concept of Salvation and damnation as Christanity views these topics.

What are some of the divisions in Judaism?

Simple Answer The three divisions are orthodox, conservative, and reform. Complex Answer As to be expected, given such a relatively low population and low level of societal integration, Judaism has only two major sects. However, they have very different perceptions of each other and these are the Torah Jews and the Liberal Jews. The main divisions between these sects is the ability to use non-Judaic source content to abrogate and modernize Jewish teaching and practice. Torah Jews believe that such things represent a deterioration of Jewish identity and purpose whereas Liberal Jews see Jewish Identity to be more internal or ethnic and the religious aspect to be secondary. As a result, Torah Jews believe Liberal Jews to have "lost their way" and Liberal Jews see Torah Jews as being antiquated and "out of sync" with the modern world. Regardless of whether a person is a Torah Jew or a Liberal Jew, that person may also practice rites derivative of his ancestral region such as Eastern European customs, Iberian customs, North African customs, etc. These customs do not affect other Jews as perceiving him as Jewish and these rites are all co-equal. Within the Torah Judaism Sect there are a number of movements distinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. The Modern Orthodox are typically seen as the more liberal branch of Torah Judaism and typically wear Jewish paraphenalia (such as a Kippa and Tzitzit) although they will dress in a typical business-suit and work in Western companies. On the more conservative side are the Hasidim and Ultra-Orthodox who wear unique vestment at all times and are recognizable by their payyot (sideburn-curls). Within Liberal Judaism there are a number of movements also distinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. At the most liberal are Secular Jews who may make Jewish foods and sing Jewish songs, but rarely attend synagogue services and do not perform the daily acts required of Torah Jews. In Liberal Judaism there is a question as to how much Hebrew and how much Vernacular should be used in a Synagogue Service. Conservative Jews, on the more conservative side typically prefer more Hebrew, whereas Reform Jews prefer more Vernacular. Liberal Jews are often well-acclimated to non-Jewish society and may have many non-Jewish friends and contacts.

What types of internal differences and divisions exist within Judaism Christianity and Islam?

Definitions: Prior to having a serious discussion about the different religious divisions in Judaism Christianity and Islam, several words must be defined for the sake of clarity. These terms are used this way exclusively in this answer and may have different names or connotations elsewhere. (For example, the term defined here as "Movement" is typically called a "School" in the Islamic context.) Religion: A faith cemented by acts and prayers which is relatively distinct. Sect: A portion of a religion that believes other members of other sects to be improperly following the religion and thus not achieving that religion's central goal. Movement: A portion of a sect whose members have a unique style of praying and living that is approved of by members of other movements in the same sect, but is representative of their interpretation of the sect's purpose. Rite or Ritual: A repertoire of physical acts that takes place during worship or religious activities. These are usually different across geographic regions. Judaism: As to be expected, given such a relatively low population and low level of societal integration, Judaism has only two major sects. However, they have very different perceptions of each other and these are the Torah Jews and the Liberal Jews. The main divisions between these sects is the ability to use non-Judaic source content to abrogate and modernize Jewish teaching and practice. Torah Jews believe that such things represent a deterioration of Jewish identity and purpose whereas Liberal Jews see Jewish Identity to be more internal or ethnic and the religious aspect to be secondary. As a result, Torah Jews believe Liberal Jews to have "lost their way" and Liberal Jews see Torah Jews as being antiquated and "out of sync" with the modern world. Regardless of whether a person is a Torah Jew or a Liberal Jew, that person may also practice rites derivative of his ancestral region such as Eastern European customs, Iberian customs, North African customs, etc. These customs do not affect other Jews as perceiving him as Jewish and these rites are all co-equal. Within the Torah Judaism Sect there are a number of movements distinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. The Modern Orthodox are typically seen as the more liberal branch of Torah Judaism and typically wear Jewish paraphernalia (such as a Kippa and Tzitzit) although they will dress in a typical business-suit and work in Western companies. On the more conservative side are the Hasidim and Ultra-Orthodox who wear unique vestment at all times and are recognizable by their payyot (sideburn-curls). Within Liberal Judaism there are a number of movements also distinguished by their level of integration with the non-Jewish World, their styles of prayer, and their level of conservatism. At the most liberal are Secular Jews who may make Jewish foods and sing Jewish songs, but rarely attend synagogue services and do not perform the daily acts required of Torah Jews. In Liberal Judaism there is a question as to how much Hebrew and how much Vernacular should be used in a Synagogue Service. Conservative Jews, on the more conservative side typically prefer more Hebrew, whereas Reform Jews prefer more Vernacular. Liberal Jews are often well-acclimated to non-Jewish society and may have many non-Jewish friends and contacts. Christianity There are six major sects in Christianity and some say even more, but the easiest way to break up Christianity is into these six categories: Orthodox, Catholic, Protestant, Oriental, Modern, and Mormon. Each of these groups believe the other groups are failing in their attempt to reach proper salvation through the Christ and as such have their own methods of attaining this goal. Orthodox Christianity is the one of the oldest Christian Sects in the sense that it represents a fragment of the original Church and holds many doctrines in common with Catholicism as concerns the Sacraments. The disagreement between the Orthodox and Catholic is over leadership. The Orthodox maintain that the Church is a community of Patriarchs all with equal standing as opposed to a Pope with supreme power over all cardinals. Orthodox are most famous for praying with icons. There are several movements in Orthodox Christianity, the most famous being the Greek Orthodox and the Russian Orthodox, but there are also Georgian Orthodox, Bulgarian Orthodox, Slavic Orthodox, and Eastern Orthodox. Catholicism is also one of the oldest Christian Sects in the sense that it represents a fragment of the original Church. Catholics hold that all seven sacraments are necessary to be saved along with the proper Eucharist. Catholicism also has several co-equal rites such as the Roman Rite (the most popular), the Byzantine Rite, the Slavic Rite, and so on. All Catholics (and exclusively Catholics) recognize the infallibility of the Pope on certain matters and the Pope's rule over Christendom. Protestantism incorporates a wide variety of different movements and in certain cases, different sects in its umbrella. As a result, it is hard to pin down Protestantism. It formed as a rejection of Catholic doctrine in some cases, especially as concerns Calvinists and Lutherans or Catholic power in some cases, especially as concerns Anglicanism/Episcopalianism and Presbyterianism. As Protestant doctrines most often derive from the idea that the Bible should be the only source of Christian belief, differing interpretations of the Bible have made Protestant movements most prone to splitting. New Protestant movements are being created all of the time, with the Evangelical Movement among the fastest growing forms of Christianity. Most African-Americans ascribe to Protestant movements such as the Baptist Church. The Oriental Orthodox Churches are not a uniform group of churches, but this group represents all of the Churches of the Old World that do not fit neatly into the categories of Orthodox, Catholic, or Protestant. These churches include the Armenian Apostolic Church, the Egyptian Coptic Church, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, and the early Christian Heretical Religions (such as the Nestorians and Justinians). What makes these Christian sects unique is different in every case. The Ethiopians have additional holy books and a unique liturgy, the Coptics hold to Monophysite Heresy, the Armenian Church did not join with the Early Patriarchs of the Church, and so forth. Modern Christianity refers to new movements of Christianity that have developed in the last 200 years. The most famous of these is the Jehovah's Witnesses, but there are numerous other similar churches. They engage in relatively cultish and insular behaviors and many focus quite strongly in Christian eschatology. Mormonism is a uniquely American form of Christianity (that is to say it embodies many American cultural ideas and American locales not that exclusively Americans are Mormons). Mormonism holds the Divine Revelation extended beyond the Biblical Period, resulting in additional Testaments of His Will. The most famous of these new documents is the Book of Mormon. Additionally Mormons believe that Divine Revelation continues into the present day and the Elder Mormon Leadership has partial access to Divine Knowledge in order to arbitrate Questions of the Faith. Many Christians outside of Mormonism consider Mormonism to be a heresy as it does not hold to the Nicene Creed's understanding of the Trinity. Islam There are three main sects within Islam: Ahl Sunna (commonly called Sunni), Shi'a (commonly called Shiite) and Ibadi. The main distinction between them is who has the right to power over the community. However, as simple as that may seem at first blush, it lead to numerous smaller but significant differences. Sunni Islam is the dominant sect of Islam worldwide and established the Rule of Intikhabat and Ashura (Elections) for Mohammed's successors. Sunni Islam has many different forms. The most common movement of Islam is Hanafi, which is dominant in South Asia, the Levant, north Mesopotamia, Turkey, and southeast Europe. Sunni also has a mystical movement called Sufism of which many submovements exist like the Turkish Dervishes. In recent times, Saudi Arabia has stimulated a submovement within the Hanbali movement called Wahhabism which is a fundamentalist strain of Islam. Shiite Islam is the dominant sect of Islam in Iran and the surrounding area. It was originally the political faction supporting Ali as Mohammed's successor instead of the elections. This has led to the ascription of martyrdom to Ali's sons: Hassan and Hussein who wished to promulgate a Caliphate from what the Shiites see as the rightful line. The most prominent movement in Shiite Islam is the Ja'afari Movement. Shiite submovements have historically been quite varied leading to groups as different as the Ismailis and the Alawites, both groups existing outside of the majority Shiite area today. Former Shiite submovements have now exited the religion of Islam such as the Druze and the Baha'i. Shiite movements are unique in that the process of Ijtihad (Open Religious Jurisprudence) continues solely in Shiite Islam. Ibadi Islam is the dominant sect of Islam in Oman. It is an offshoot of the third party in the Islamic Civil War (Fitna al-Kubra), the Kharijites (the other two parties were the Sunnis and the Shiites). Ibadi Islam is so small that it has no internal movements. Ibadi holds to a moderated version of the Kharijite purification requirements by limiting contact with unbelievers and increasing contact with proper believers. They also hold with the tradition Kharijite view of the Rightly-Guided Caliphs, namely that Abu Bakr and Omar were proper rulers, Othman was not and Ali lost favor when he agreed to the Arbitration with Mu'awiya. In addition to the three main sects of Islam, there are also minor sects like the Ahmadiyya which are considered blasphemous (takfir) by the remaining Muslim sects. Ahmadiyya was founded by a prophet (Mirza Ghulam) and, according to most Muslims, this violates the Islamic concept that Mohammed was the capstone of the Prophets: the last and final prophet. The difference between Ahmadiyya versus Baha'i and Druze is that the Ahmadiyya still see themselves as Muslims whereas Druze and Baha'i do not.

What are popular sects of Judaism?

In Judaism, they are called movements, not sects. The popular movements in the United States are Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform. There are many different kinds of Orthodox- Chasidim, Hardedim, Chabadniks, Yeshivish, Modern Orthodox, and even a blend of Orthodox and Conservative called Conservadox. However, the most popular sect (in terms of sheer numbers) of Judaism is Secular Judaism or Cultural Judaism even though the Orthodox are seen as being the representatives of "true" Jewish religion.

What divisions existed within judaism in the 1st century BC?

There were the Torah-sages and their disciples There were the Sadducees (people involved in politics and power-struggles) There were the Essenes (a tiny group of non-traditional semi-messianic people)

What were the sects within the religion of Christianity?

\n . Christianity i ncludes the Catholic, Protestant, and Eastern Orthodox churches. To be Christian simply means that you believe in Christ as the savior, the Son of God. Any religion encompassing this belief falls into the category of Christianity.

Are christians divisions within the religion?

Not quite sure what you mean. Christianity is divided into several groups, often called "churches" or "denominations".

When did Christianity begin as a minor sect in Judaism?

From the momentt of Christianity's inception, it began breakingaway from Judaism. So the phrase "in Judaism" is not the mostaccurate way to put it.

What are some of the divisions within judaism?

There are quite a few divisions within Judaism. Some of the mainones are Orthodox, Reconstructionist, Conservative, & Reform.

Does a conversion to Judaism by one sect have validity in all other sects?

Adding somewhat to the response from Prioktan 918, while OrthodoxJews are most likely to accept a conversion supervised by Orthodoxrabbis, the Conservative movement is more concerned with the natureof the conversion. If the traditional requirements of study,immersion in a mikveh (ritual bath), circumcision for a man andappearance before a bet din (rabbinic court) are followed, theconversion is likely to be accepted, whether conducted byConservative, Reconstructionist or Reform rabbi.

What are the main branches within Judaism?

Orthodox Jews believe that the Torah must be fully observed(Deuteronomy 13:5). They keep the laws of Judaism as codified inthe Shulchan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law), which lists the laws ofthe Torah as explained in the Talmud. Torah-study is seen as veryimportant (Deuteronomy 5:1); and the modern world is seen assubservient to the Torah (Talmud, Nedarim 32a), not the other wayaround. Other Jewish groups (Conservative, Reform) adapt, curtail or changethe Torah-laws in contemporary life, to a greater or lesser degree.

What sect of Judaism is most extreme?

Orthodox Jews are most extreme in adhering to Jewish tradition,while such groups as Humanistic Jews, Reform Jews andReconstructionist Jews are most extreme in non-observance of (someor many) Jewish traditions.