Shortening

Parent Category: Vegetable Oils
Shortening is a type of kind of solid fat. It is made of vegetable oils such as soybean and cottonseed oil.
Butter has a lower melting point so it is going to spread more in the dumpling and they may be a little looser, but should still be alright.
Any solid shortening will work. The finished product will vary a little bit in flavor, but should be acceptable. For tea biscuits, I would use butter or margarine for flavor. Crisco or other vegetable shortening will work but I would stay away from animal fats.
For one cup shortening use 1 cup butter or 1 cup margarine minus 1/2 teaspoon salt from recipe.
shortening can be used for cookies because you don't have to put it in the freezer like butter. but you can use butter or vegetable oil to replace shortening but you will have to wait.
The only difference is that butter has a lower melting point than solid shortening. This will cause them to spread just a little bit more, but not enough to worry about.
There are 32 ounces in a quart so, 2 times 32 is 64. 64 is the answer.
I have spent 15 yrs making Puff Pastry and first of all taste is important aim for a fat with a buttery taste along with being able to remain in a solid state at room temperature as the method to make puff pastry is to create layers and incorporate air. It is not possible to buy good quality Puff...
Same amounts, the problem is that butter has a lower melting point than shortening. Depending on the recipe, this can cause the finished product to be greasy or to spread more. Usually, a recipe has been tried several different ways before it becomes common. It is likely that shortening was chosen...
It would depend on what the butter is doing and how much of the flavor of the recipe it is. If it is a sauce or a large part of the recipe, I wouldn't. I wouldn't make sugar cookies with shortening instead of butter.
It's an even up exchange. If it calls for one cup of shortening, use one cup of applesause.. It's a great way to make fat free baked goods.. I've heard of applesauce being used to replace eggs (I think 1/4 c per egg) but I've never heard of it used for shortening.
\nYes, but the flavor will be altered and not have the butter flavor from the butter flavored shortening
It depends what you are making. Something sweet can be baked without shortening by using cooking oil like canola or butter. Something savory you can use olive oil or butter as well, it really depends on what you are cooking.
Vegetable oil and butter are two types of shortening. All fats and oils are shortening, and can be substituted for each other, but this will affect the flavour and texture of the food, as some shortenings have stronger and different flavours, and also have different melting points.
For most things. Let it cool and the finished product will be slightly heavier with shortening.
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Shortening is used to make the dish fluffy.
it first came out in 1911.
Shortening provides rich flavor and pleasing mouth-feel to cake.Different types of shortening, whether butter, solid vegetableshortening, or different oils, will contribute different flavors tothe cake. Shortening gets its name from its function in pastry,where fat separates layers of flour,...
Its like butter, basically. Adds nutritional value as well it doesn't allow it to stick to pans as easily. Makes the cookies a nice texture, removes the dryness.
shortening helps make scones light, fluffy and flaky. google subsitutes for shortening to see if there is one. butter will probably be listed as one. if you're looking to lighten up the recipe and omit shortening, try a whipped butter. same effect, not so heavy & less calories.
You can store shortening in both these places. It really depends on how long you want to store it. If you want it to last longer, then store it in the refrigerator. If you use it fast enough, you can store it in the cupboard. Since shortening is fairly cheep, I would recommend storing it in the...
When making chocolate covered pretzels all you need is melted chocolate and a bag of pretzels. Melt the Chocolate in a double Boiler(if you do not have a double boiler put one pan on top of another and fill the bottom one with water) bring the water to a boil to melt the chocolate. Dip the pretzels...
Use the same amount
Not quite shortening, but close, Canola Oil there are 81.39 cups in a 35lb container. Figured by 1 cup weighing .43 of a pound.
I'll assume you meant butter for one of your shortenings. In most recipes, any solid shortening can be substituted for any other solid. The end product will vary some and in some cases it has to be shortening or it has to be butter. You will just have to try it both ways and see how it turns out.
It is known as effacement. Usually occurs before dilation in first time mom's and after dilation is subsequent pregnancies. Labor doesn't usually occur until after 100% effacement and 10 cm dilation. If labor does occur and the cervix is not 100% effaced and dilated, then a C-section is a...
If you want a substitute for healthy reasons, I suggest using coconut oil. It's good for you and tastes good. Otherwise, organic's always better! Butter is shortening. It's also a natural product without - in most countries - artificial additives enhancing its flavour or colour, unlike margarine...
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White shortening is just another term for plain shortening. It's used to distinguish from butter-flavored shortening. If you're not from the US or Canada and don't know what shortening is at all, it's made from partially-hydrogenated vegetable oil and is used as a substitute for lard and butter...
i would use it its better for you and it works great but you might want to add in an egg for the taste of crispy on the outside chewy in the inside and it hold the cookie better.
no it does not it will still be the same just a different color.
Because both butter and shortening are fats that are solid at room temperature, they work much the same in baked products. Advertisers promoting vegetable shortening do claim that products baked with shortening rise more or will have better appearance and texture. These claims may or may not be true...
Sometimes shortening, such as Crisco, comes in flavors like "butter flavored".. Check your local grocery store for other varieties.
Substitutes for shortening are butter and margarine in sticks. Use the same amount as called for in your recipe. Keep in mind, plain shortening will NOT be as flavorful as butter or margarine.. Do not use soft margarine in a tub as it contains too much water.
In some recipes, oil works well in place of shortening. If a solid fat is needed, lard or schmaltz (chicken fat) will work.
Yes, and it is probably better for you. Shortening is made with hydrogenated fat, which we probably all should try to reduce in our diets. The results will be a bit different. Butter will add a bit more moisture to your recipe. If you are baking your recipe, such as cookies, you might want to add...
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Yes, you can use olive oil in any cake recipe to replace any other fat. You might want to use regular olive oil instead of extra virgin as it has a lot of flavour. A lot of people will tell you not to use EVOO because of that, but if you don't use too much, it tastes great in any recipe.
It shortens the gluten strands, making your dough easier to work with.
Yes, this may sound weird but because of the chemical bonds and compounds this works. If you whip 3 egg whites in a bowl until it forms stiff peaks add 1 teaspoon lemon juice one cup of flour little olive oil, and 2 table spoons of salt it would be exactly the same as 1cup of shorting. yes u may...
No. It is just vegetable oil. I don't think animal fat shortening is even available except for straight lard.
12 tsp 1 oz = 6 tsp 1 tsp = 0.16 oz
Butter and shortening may be directly substituted for each other, so one half cup butter is the equivalent of one half cup shortening.
A Pastry Blender is the curved instrument used to cut shortening or you may use 2 forks.
The shortening can be replaced with butter of margarine. One can replace buttermilk with regular milk or you may add a teaspoon of vinegar to the milk which will make it curdle.
In general there is no noticeable difference other than the price.
Yes. The butter should be well-chilled, then cut into small pieces.
Crustal shortening is the reduction of the size of the Earth's crust through tectonic activities such as those found at a convergent plate boundary. When an oceanic crust collides with a continental crust, the denser oceanic crust subducts beneath the continental crust. This causes the oceanic crust...
Applesauce can be substituted for shortening in some cookie recipes, although the resulting cookies will be noticeably different from those made with shortening. Applesauce should not be used in shortbread-type cookies.
Yes, in some cake recipes, canola oil can be substituted for shortening.
Crisco is the most popular vegetable shortening and can be found in a local grocery store. For example Walmart or any Supermarket.(:
Yes. Butter gives frosting a delicious flavor, and does not have the harmful partially hydrogenated oils found in shortening.
To contract is to perform 'flexure', or, to be said to 'flex'.
Yes, margarine could be substituted for shortening, but most muesli slice recipes call for butter rather than either margarine or shortening.
It depends on the recipe. Shortening becomes solid at room temperature while vegetable oil does not. So vegetable oil may be substituted for melted shortening only in recipes that do not depend on shortening becoming solid for texture when cooled.
If one forgets to put shortening in dough, the results depend entirely on what type of dough the batch was supposed to be. Breads are often formulated without oil or shortening; the bread would probably be edible, but dryer than it should be. On the other hand, pie dough and many cookies made...