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Cattle Reproduction

Parent Category: Cows and Cattle
Knowing reproduction of cattle is important to the herd, no matter how big or small it is. Cattle reproduction involves breeding, genetics pregnancy, calving, care of the young calf and weaning, all of which is involved in the reproduction of cattle. Questions about everything involving in cattle reproduction, including a little on lactation, can be asked and answered here.
No, not really. A cow should be having her calf to full term, not calving 5 weeks prior to the expected due date. You should get her tested for diseases like BVDV (Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus), H. somnus, Leptospirosis, Listeriosis, Neosporosis, Salmonellosis, Chlamydia, Sarcocytosis or TB ...
Are you meaning fetal development, or in a heifer? In the heifer,the udder starts to form as her unborn-calf develops, although thisdevelopment can vary dramatically from heifer to heifer. Some fullybag-up (are full of milk) weeks before the calf is born; some donot get a full udder right before or...
The estrous cycle of cattle is the period from one estrus (heat,phase of sexual receptivity) to the next estrus. For the cow andheifer, this period averages 21 days , with a typical range of 18 to 24 days in length.
No. The calf will obviously be too big to get his shoulders through the pelvic opening and through the birth canal without causing extensive damage to both himself an the cow, even if he was pulled out with a calf puller. You're much better off getting the vet out to do a Caesarean section on her to...
Genetics is a tricky thing and there are no 100% guarantees thatyou will get the color you want. That being said the best possibleway that this might be achieved would to test the genetics of eachbreeding pair. And continue to breed a successful pair, but have acare not to over breed them. A roan...
Any time of the year, if you have a year-round calving operation. For those on set calving schedules, calving ranges from January all the way to May, and some calve in autumn, which is from September to December.
A Punnett Square is the best option to use on crossing colors. TheAlleles would be BB for Pure Dominant Black while bb is for PureRecessive White. Bb would be a Black cow carrying a White allele.
Cows are mature female bovines that are capable of having calves. By "having" I mean that they are able to conceive, grow and give birth to live young. Gestation is just a fancy term for pregnancy, which also means that a cow is capable of being pregnant with a calf (being the fetus) inside her. ...
3 to 6 months. Bottle calves are weaned from the bottle by the time they reach 3 months of age. They can become feeders then or when they reach "weaning" age which, for most calves that have been on their mother's milk, is the age that they are weaned and sold.
Generally the veterinarian that services farm animals will come out to your farm, there are exceptions such as university clinics where a farm animal may be taken in at the request of the vet for additional tests, treatment or study.
A newborn calf should have colostrum as soon as it is born, because it contains antibodies and immunoglobins that are crucial to the calf's health and immunity to the mass of bacteria and viruses floating around that could make a calf sick. There is a 90% chance that the calf will not survive if he...
This depends on when you first put the calf on the bottle. But mainly, it'll be a few months that a calf goes from being dependent on the bottle to being fed as a feeder calf.
It would be a good idea. It would create less stress on the new moms and babies if the bigger steers aren't in there with them, as the steers may pose a threat to the newly born calf and cause Momma to get a little more antsier than necessary.
first find the right cow that you would like to breed with yours then put them into the same stall and let them be. if it is the right one then they will breed but if they are not attracted then maybe not.
Because it's her instinctual, psychological and physical desires to breed to produce offspring and pass on her genes. It's just like with any other mammal in this world.
Two cows cannot mate to get a calf (or "cow" in this instance). You have to have a BULL and a cow to get a baby calf. Just like you gotta have a Mom and a Dad to "make" you. Now back to the question. If the bull is black and the cow is black, there is a high chance that you will get a black...
Depending on the breed they cost from $50 to $175. Holsteins, Jersey, and Longhorns are at the lower end and Angus, Brangus, and Charolais are on the higher end. This price range is for newborn calves under two weeks ago.
A boys body regulates the temperature to his genitalia to ensure his seed remains viable (use-able). Sweat glands ensure the heat is dissipated before it cooks the sperm.
This is the wrong question to ask, actually. You should be more concerned about the age that you should put a heifer in with a bull to be bred, not when should a heifer be taken away from a bull. See the related question below, but generally, a heifer should be at least 15 months of age to be bred...
The third trimester of a cow would be days 195 to 285 of a cow's gestation period. This is a critical period of a cow's pregnancy because the calf is growing more in size than it has in the last two trimesters.
A kid is a goat's baby.
Call the vet, this is called a prolapse and needs to be pushed back in and stitched in place, and antibiotics administered.
The base of a bull's penis (inside the bull) is a sigmoid flexture, which is curved in an S shape when retrated inside the bull, held by muscles that keep it that way. When the bull is sexually aroused and extends his penis to copulate a cow, the muscles relax and the sigmoid flexture straightens...
It means that a cow is giving birth to a newborn baby calf.
It can if you're giving it milk replacer. A calf at that age needs its milk otherwise it will starve/dehydrate to death.
When they are in estrus or in heat. Cows and ewes often act in a similar when they are in need of a partner to mate with; they are more vocal, more mobile and ride other herdmates or vice versa. If you have a bull or ram in with the cows or ewes, respectively, the bull or ram will follow the cow or...
Not generally - most cow-calf operators have the skill to give neonatal vaccines to newborn calves themselves without having a veterinarian out to give the shots. This is more economical for the producer, and the calves get the vaccines they need.
At first, in her first stage of labour, she will be pacing around, laying down then getting up repeatedly, then stopping suddenly as if she's straining (which she probably is). You will see a thick mucus discharge from her vulva, soon followed by a water sac (yellowish in colour). The uterine...
but it may not be the best for them. Cow's milk is for calfs, not hamsters, cats, or even people (even though we do drink it).
He/she may have had a difficult birth and could be weak and cold, warm her up, rub her down with towels, call your vet to see if you need to give her a glucose shot. You may also have a "Dummy " or Silly" calf. They are not born with a strong suck response. I am currently tube feeding one now....
What is BCS? Body condition score or BCS of cattle is very important in determining the fertility and feed efficiency of your animals. BCS is used in all animals, primarily more in terms of health than reproductive ability and feed conversion. It is a measure of fat cover over an animal's body on...
A calf does not produce milk. Calves "turn into" heifers which "turn into" cows which produce milk. Cows only produce milk after they have had a calf.
No. The best way to tell a cow is pregnant by rectal palpation or blood test. Deciphering whether she's pregnant by her udder is much different than seeing if she's about to give birth. An udder will often get enlarged and the teats will look full (as well as the vulva gets looking loose and floppy...
Cattle are mammals, they give birth to live young, and do not lay eggs.
The St Lawrence River is 744 miles (1,197 kms) long.
Is this a question of inbreeding.
This is a difficult question to answer, since the sex of a calf is actually predetermined by the sire, not the dam. Also, how many heifers a cow has in her lifetime is more variable than you can imagine: some cows never give birth to heifer calves, others give birth to nothing but heifer calves, and...
Baby calves go "Merrrrr!"
A calf can start walking within an hour or two (or sometimes sooner) after it is born.
What kind of "hormone" are you concerned about? There is more than one type of hormone that can be found in milk, aside from growth hormone. Most hormones that are in milk are in trace amounts that are barely detectible, and are normally found in all females that produce milk: Oxytocin, Progesterone...
It depends on how hard a birth it is. Sometimes you'll find a cow able to give birth standing, while others prefer to lay down on the ground and push their calf out.
Unpasteurized cow's milk (i.e. straight from the udder) or packaged milk replacer you can purchase from your vet or a feed store. DO NOT feed soy milk replacer!
A baby calf is just that: a baby, not an animal that is able to breed yet. Calves are only able to breed by the time they are around 15 months of age, and at that age they have lost their calf stage.
Cattle that need to consume a higher concentrate diet and produce more methane than other cows affect the environment. Cows that require a higher concentrate means that farmers are converting more land into crop land to meet those requirements. Dairy cows are a prime example of this. Those that...
These type of cattle are not used on commercial cattle operations, and are often breeds that are considered rare or threatened in comparison with the other popular breeds. Backyard breeds include Irish Dexters, miniature cattle like Mini Angus or Mini Jerseys, Galloway, Highlanders, and dairy breeds...
Colostrum should NOT be given to adult cattle because they don't need it. There will be no side-effects, but it's just not wise to waste all that colostrum on mature cattle when it should be stored in the freezer and ONLY used on orphaned newborn calves.
No. Heifers are bred the same ways other cows are, with natural service via a bull, or artificial service via artificial insemination. Only difference with natural service is that the bull must be young or small to prevent any potential back or leg injuries. Big mature bulls are very heavy, and a...
Sadly, this is often true. A good cow or heifer can have the looks of a good cow or heifer, but when it comes to producing a good calf, they fall short. And it's not always the bull's fault. A good lookin' heifer may be the one that has more trouble calving, or one that raises an average to poor...
Inhumane Death : Denying am orphaned calf colostrum, milk or not hydrating it when it gets scours is a sure way to kill a calf. Other ways include running it over with a truck, quad or tractor; "accidentally" (whether it is or not) dropping a bale or bale feeder on top of it; allowing it to...
A cow can have anywhere from one to 20 calves in her lifetime, depending on how productive she is and how long she is able to stay in the herd to produce those calves. On average, a cow will produce eight calves in her lifetime. Cows that are used for embryo transfer can produce up to twice as...
There shouldn't be too much risk involved, especially if you abort early enough so that the heifer doesn't have trouble pushing it out. Most cases she should be able to come back into heat and be rebred. Have a vet check her out first though (if you haven't already) in case she has an abnormal...
It's really hard to say, but its highly likely that it may not grow back. Of course it depends on the nature and severity of the injury itself. If the hoof is cut clean off, then its likely it won't; but if only a part of it is missing and the calf is still quite young, it's possible, but still...
It is the anatomy of the cow where sperm from a bull is deposited so that a calf can be conceived and given birth to. It contains the ovaries, the fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, vagina and vulva. The udder of a cow is also a part of the cow's reproductive system, since it provides the milk for a...
Answer . \nevery women is different and they may not start to show late into there pregnancy, where some women start to show quite early. you must remember that every pregnancy is different and not worry, however if you are worried you should speak to your midwife.
Yes they are much more susceptible to heat and cold stress than their dams and sires. Winter-born calves then need access to plenty of straw and a good shed to keep them protected from the nasty winter cold and keep them warm when they are not frolicking in the snow or nursing from Momma.
Possibly, yes. This same practice occurred when African Americans where kept as slaves way back when.
Females: - Infections that have spread to the uterus from diseases such as Chlamydia, Haemophilus somnus, Neosporosis, Tuberculosis and Vibrosis, - Infections from Dystocia (difficult birth) when the calf was manipulated and the uterine wall was damaged causing Metritis; Bacterial Metritis more...
When she is too thin, too old, or ill. A cow doesn't really lose her fertility, it just decreases.
When the heifers are at least 14 months old, you can put yearling bulls (15-20 heifers per bull for yearlings) in with them. Don't put your big mature bulls in with your heifers as this could cause problems later on.
Three to four feet from nose to the base of the tail.
Typically she'll drink around 7% of her body weight per day, more if she's eating drier or high saline feedstuffs.
A cow is a female bovine who has had a calf. She was a calf when she was born, became no longer a calf after she was weaned. Before being put to the bull for the first time she was a heifer and became a cow after she had her first calf.
It depends, Many dairies have no bulls on the farm and all breeding is done by artificial insemination. Most small farms only need one bull, especially if the bull is with the cows all year round and you don't have a defined breeding season. Things you need to take into account though are...
You will have to bottle feed the calf, and feed the cow high nutritional feed to get her milk production back up. She may be at the point where she's too old to be producing milk any more, and should be on your short-list to cull her from the herd.
LOL they're the same cows, only thing is that the "colostrum milk cows" are those cows that have just given birth to a new calf. Colostrum flows for 24 to 48 hours, before the milk in their udders "converts" into "real" milk that we drink.
For dairy and bottle calves: At two months you should begin to feed the calf grain. At about 3 months the calf should be eating hay and be limited to 1 bottle of milk a day. At 4 months the calf should be weaned. For beef calves, they should be weaned when they are 6 to 8 months of age by...
Cows don't lay eggs, chickens do. However a cow's "eggs" or ovum "matures" in the cow's fallopian tube near the uterus which sits in wait for the sperm from the bull to fertilize or fuse with it.
It varies with breed, but 9 months (or ~285 days) is about average.
Anywhere from 2 minutes to about an hour.
If you're selecting the bull on the basis of it's own body production, you look for muscularity and size. For breeding purpose, most producers prefer selecting the bull on the basis of the quality of its progeny (babies). If the babies have good build, and have higher feed conversion ratio (more...
A calf should get colostrum within an hour or so after birth. Colostrum in the cow will be produced for the next 24 to 48 hours after the calf is born, but at eat time frame, the quality of the colostrum decreases, which means that if the calf receives its colostrum after 24 hours or more, its...
If well cared for and has had its colostrum? 95%. If not well cared-for, and he didn't receive colostrum, then that rate dives down to 10% survivability.
Calves need a higher ration of energy, calcium, phosphorus, and essential vitamins and minerals than mature cows do. Milk, grain and grass as well as a mineral lick and water will help meet these needs.
For cattle, a heifer calf. For dolphins, a female calf.
they maybe would not make milk for us to drink
It depends on what they have prolapsed, since there are three types of prolapses: rectal, uterine, and vaginal. If it is a female that has a uterine prolapse this can be a result of a birthing complication, and may be due to a chemical imbalance that is telling her to continue pushing, or because...
Because most bulls don't reach sexual maturity until they are 10 to 12 months old.
It can if it is subject to excess cold and wet; scouring and BRD gets to be a problem with calves born and living in a cold and muddy environment with no shelter or dry straw to run to.
Calves don't get pregnant, cows do.
It may be humane to put it down. But there are a vast number of reasons why a calf won't get up, and it's best to talk to your veterinarian or get the calf to a large animal vet to diagnose why it won't stand up on its own.
It could be that she's going into heat, and is ready to be bred. Her calf would be around 2 months of age (or 45 to 60 days old) by this time.
Progesterone is the hormone that maintains pregnancy in the cow. This is a sort of "barrier" that prohibits any hormonal reaction that would trigger the cow to begin parturition. If the progesterone "barrier" breaks down, estrogen levels increase promoting the consequential reaction to begin labour....
A hind's mate is called a hart. A hind is a female red deer and ahart is a male red deer.
Yes, if (and only if!!) the milk from these cows are not being used for human consumption.
If you're sexually active, you're going to definitely want to take a pregnancy test. Is this normal for your periods? Have you ever been this late before?
A cow will (or should) start to ovulate 18 to 24 days after giving birth. Cows that have given birth to a stillborn calf or have aborted their calves will tend to start ovulation sooner. A cow that has a retained placenta may take longer to come back into estrus as well. But, even though a cow has...
Yes and no. If a calf is born at the right time, he won't be coming out all yellow-looking, which happens more often when a cow drops a calf all on her own. But, if a calf is having to stay in the womb a little longer than normal, he will defecate or even pee in the womb, causing the amniotic fluid...
None. Bulls don't "have" babies. But they can make calves by breeding a cow or two. Or more. The average offspring that a bull can sire can range from 10 to 50 calves in a breeding season. Of course this depends on the cows' ability to settle when bred and not abort.