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Cattle Reproduction

Parent Category: Cows and Cattle
Knowing reproduction of cattle is important to the herd, no matter how big or small it is. Cattle reproduction involves breeding, genetics pregnancy, calving, care of the young calf and weaning, all of which is involved in the reproduction of cattle. Questions about everything involving in cattle reproduction, including a little on lactation, can be asked and answered here.
Are you meaning fetal development, or in a heifer? In the heifer,  the udder starts to form as her unborn-calf develops, although this  development can vary dramatically from heifer to heifer. Some fully  bag-up (are full of milk) weeks before the calf is born; some do  not get a full udder...
The estrous cycle of cattle is the period from one estrus (heat,  phase of sexual receptivity) to the next estrus. For the cow and  heifer, this period averages  21 days, with a typical range of 18 to 24 days in length.
Genetics is a tricky thing and there are no 100% guarantees that  you will get the color you want. That being said the best possible  way that this might be achieved would to test the genetics of each  breeding pair. And continue to breed a successful pair, but have a  care not to over breed...
Any time of the year, if you have a year-round calving operation. For those on set calving schedules, calving ranges from January all the way to May, and some calve in autumn, which is from September to December.
A Punnett Square is the best option to use on crossing colors. The  Alleles would be BB for Pure Dominant Black while bb is for Pure  Recessive White. Bb would be a Black cow carrying a White allele.
Cows are mature female bovines that are capable of having calves. By "having" I mean that they are able to conceive, grow and give birth to live young. Gestation is just a fancy term for pregnancy, which also means that a cow is capable of being pregnant with a calf (being the fetus) inside her. ...
  Generally the veterinarian that services farm animals will come out to your farm, there are exceptions such as university clinics where a farm animal may be taken in at the request of the vet for additional tests, treatment or study.
A newborn calf should have colostrum as soon as it is born, because it contains antibodies and immunoglobins that are crucial to the calf's health and immunity to the mass of bacteria and viruses floating around that could make a calf sick. There is a 90% chance that the calf will not survive if he...
first find the right cow that you would like to breed with yours then put them into the same stall and let them be. if it is the right one then they will breed but if they are not attracted then maybe not.
Because it's her instinctual, psychological and physical desires to breed to produce offspring and pass on her genes. It's just like with any other mammal in this world.
Depending on the breed they cost from $50 to $175. Holsteins, Jersey, and Longhorns are at the lower end and Angus, Brangus, and Charolais are on the higher end. This price range is for newborn calves under two weeks ago.
A boys body regulates the temperature to his genitalia to ensure his seed remains viable (use-able). Sweat glands ensure the heat is dissipated before it cooks the sperm.
This is the wrong question to ask, actually. You should be more concerned about the age that you should put a heifer in with a bull to be bred, not when should a heifer be taken away from a bull. See the related question below, but generally, a heifer should be at least 15 months of age to be bred...
The third trimester of a cow would be days 195 to 285 of a cow's gestation period. This is a critical period of a cow's pregnancy because the calf is growing more in size than it has in the last two trimesters.
A kid is a goat's baby.
  Call the vet, this is called a prolapse and needs to be pushed back in and stitched in place, and antibiotics administered.
When they are in estrus or in heat. Cows and ewes often act in a similar when they are in need of a partner to mate with; they are more vocal, more mobile and ride other herdmates or vice versa. If you have a bull or ram in with the cows or ewes, respectively, the bull or ram will follow the cow or...
Not generally - most cow-calf operators have the skill to give neonatal vaccines to newborn calves themselves without having a veterinarian out to give the shots. This is more economical for the producer, and the calves get the vaccines they need.
but it may not be the best for them. Cow's milk is for calfs, not hamsters, cats, or even people (even though we do drink it).
He/she may have had a difficult birth and could be weak and cold, warm her up, rub her down with towels, call your vet to see if you need to give her a glucose shot. You may also have a "Dummy " or Silly" calf. They are not born with a strong suck response. I am currently tube feeding one now. Still...
A calf does not produce milk. Calves "turn into" heifers which "turn into" cows which produce milk. Cows only produce milk after they have had a calf.
No. The best way to tell a cow is pregnant by rectal palpation or blood test. Deciphering whether she's pregnant by her udder is much different than seeing if she's about to give birth. An udder will often get enlarged and the teats will look full (as well as the vulva gets looking loose and floppy...
The St Lawrence River is 744 miles (1,197 kms) long.
Is this a question of inbreeding.
This is a difficult question to answer, since the sex of a calf is actually predetermined by the sire, not the dam. Also, how many heifers a cow has in her lifetime is more variable than you can imagine: some cows never give birth to heifer calves, others give birth to nothing but heifer calves, and...
Baby calves go "Merrrrr!"
A calf can start walking within an hour or two (or sometimes sooner) after it is born.
These type of cattle are not used on commercial cattle operations, and are often breeds that are considered rare or threatened in comparison with the other popular breeds. Backyard breeds include Irish Dexters, miniature cattle like Mini Angus or Mini Jerseys, Galloway, Highlanders, and dairy breeds...
Colostrum should NOT be given to adult cattle because they don't need it. There will be no side-effects, but it's just not wise to waste all that colostrum on mature cattle when it should be stored in the freezer and ONLY used on orphaned newborn calves.
No. Heifers are bred the same ways other cows are, with natural service via a bull, or artificial service via artificial insemination. Only difference with natural service is that the bull must be young or small to prevent any potential back or leg injuries. Big mature bulls are very heavy, and a...
Inhumane Death:Denying am orphaned calf colostrum, milk or not hydrating it when it gets scours is a sure way to kill a calf. Other ways include running it over with a truck, quad or tractor; "accidentally" (whether it is or not) dropping a bale or bale feeder on top of it; allowing it to freeze to...
A cow can have anywhere from one to 20 calves in her lifetime, depending on how productive she is and how long she is able to stay in the herd to produce those calves. On average, a cow will produce eight calves in her lifetime. Cows that are used for embryo transfer can produce up to twice as...
  == Answer ==     every women is different and they may not start to show late into there pregnancy, where some women start to show quite early. you must remember that every pregnancy is different and not worry, however if you are worried you should speak to your midwife.
Females: - Infections that have spread to the uterus from diseases such as Chlamydia, Haemophilus somnus, Neosporosis, Tuberculosis and Vibrosis, - Infections from Dystocia (difficult birth) when the calf was manipulated and the uterine wall was damaged causing Metritis; Bacterial Metritis more...
When she is too thin, too old, or ill. A cow doesn't really lose her fertility, it just decreases.
When the heifers are at least 14 months old, you can put yearling bulls (15-20 heifers per bull for yearlings) in with them. Don't put your big mature bulls in with your heifers as this could cause problems later on.
Three to four feet from nose to the base of the tail.
A cow is a female bovine who has had a calf. She was a calf when she was born, became no longer a calf after she was weaned. Before being put to the bull for the first time she was a heifer and became a cow after she had her first calf.
For dairy and bottle calves: At two months you should begin to feed the calf grain. At about 3 months the calf should be eating hay and be limited to 1 bottle of milk a day. At 4 months the calf should be weaned. For beef calves, they should be weaned when they are 6 to 8 months of age by...
Cows don't lay eggs, chickens do. However a cow's "eggs" or ovum "matures" in the cow's fallopian tube near the uterus which sits in wait for the sperm from the bull to fertilize or fuse with it.
It varies with breed, but 9 months (or ~285 days) is about average.
Anywhere from 2 minutes to about an hour.
A calf should get colostrum within an hour or so after birth. Colostrum in the cow will be produced for the next 24 to 48 hours after the calf is born, but at eat time frame, the quality of the colostrum decreases, which means that if the calf receives its colostrum after 24 hours or more, its...
If well cared for and has had its colostrum? 95%. If not well cared-for, and he didn't receive colostrum, then that rate dives down to 10% survivability.
Calves need a higher ration of energy, calcium, phosphorus, and essential vitamins and minerals than mature cows do. Milk, grain and grass as well as a mineral lick and water will help meet these needs.
they maybe would not make milk for us to drink
It depends on what they have prolapsed, since there are three types of prolapses: rectal, uterine, and vaginal. If it is a female that has a uterine prolapse this can be a result of a birthing complication, and may be due to a chemical imbalance that is telling her to continue pushing, or because...
It could be that she's going into heat, and is ready to be bred. Her calf would be around 2 months of age (or 45 to 60 days old) by this time.
A hind's mate is called a hart. A hind is a female red deer and a  hart is a male red deer.
Yes, if (and only if!!) the milk from these cows are not being used for human consumption.
If you're sexually active, you're going to definitely want to take a pregnancy test. Is this normal for your periods? Have you ever been this late before?
A cow will (or should) start to ovulate 18 to 24 days after giving birth. Cows that have given birth to a stillborn calf or have aborted their calves will tend to start ovulation sooner. A cow that has a retained placenta may take longer to come back into estrus as well. But, even though a cow has...
Yes and no. If a calf is born at the right time, he won't be coming out all yellow-looking, which happens more often when a cow drops a calf all on her own. But, if a calf is having to stay in the womb a little longer than normal, he will defecate or even pee in the womb, causing the amniotic fluid...
Yes. That's all a bull is worth, really.
Then she better have enough milk to raise the two little buggers. Otherwise one of them will have to be bottle-raised if she decides to reject one of them, particularly if one of them is smaller than the other.
A heifer becomes a cow after she has had her first calf. In other words, you can expect 0 (zero) calves from a heifer over breeding life. When she is a cow, she may have from 1 to 18 calves in her lifetime.
No. A cow can be bred or get pregnant at any time of the year.
You adopt the baby calf off of your homepage when someone posts it.They have to harvest it out of their dairy farm.
The economic advantages of cloning and transplanting cattle embryos is the you can mass produce cows for succulent beef also you can provide wonderful creamy milk which will give your country and family a more rich and wealthy life. The disadvantages of cloning is that the beef could become toxic if...
This is a leaking of amniotic fluid that lubricates the birth canal to make the birthing process easier and less painful.
Those are numbers which are impossible to obtain.
There are not many ethical issues with embryo cloning in cattle but one of them is that it's not natural.
Don't do it if the bull's way too heavy for the heifer and you can't get semen from him sufficiently to AI her. Most herd bulls are mature beasts, but if he's a yearling or a small bull, then go right ahead, put her in with him.
Zebu cows usually have quite a long gestation period, which can stretch from 290 to 300 days in length.
Since cows are mammals, baby calves get milk from their mother's mammary glands. These are located below the female cow's rib cage, on their abdomen, slightly forward of their hind legs. They are commonly known as udders, and the average cow's udders have four nipples, called teats. These teats are...
Calf's get there milk from there mothers.
Depending on the size of the calf somewhere between 3 quarts to 6 quarts of milk a day
What part of "unmated" cattle are you referring to? Are you referring to females, or males or both? It's hard to tell what you're asking, but I'll do my best. An "unmated" young female, or a young female bovine that has not been bred yet is a heifer. A bull that has never bred a cow or heifer...
That all depends on the breed[s] and genetics of that bull calf. You can bull calf birth-weights anywhere from 30 lbs (miniature) to over 100 lbs (large breeds).
Genetics. The genes in the momma cow combine with the genes from the calf's sire to create a calf with either the same colouration of the cow or not. What breed the calf's sire matters to. For instance, a Hereford sire bred to an Angus cow results in a black-baldy calf. Or, an Angus cow that has a...
A team if they are pulling a cart, or a herd if they're just grazing together.
A bull will often reach puberty by the time he's around 12 months of age (some a little sooner, if the herd's a good fertile herd), and by this time, as a Yearling Bull, he is ready to be used on heifers or sold to another producer's farm or ranch to be used on the heifers and cows there. Some...
  == Answer ==   You'll only cause more pain if you try to express colostrum prior to delivery. Your hormones change once the baby and placenta are out of your body - that is what signals your body to start making real milk.
The offspring of a cow and a bull is called a calf. If the calf is female, she is referred to as a heifer calf. If the calf is male, then he, unless castrated after birth, is called a bull calf. Castrated calves are called steer calves.
  Best time is June, this will give you 'spring' calves (March +- /no, it's not too cold). You will wean them approx. Sept 1st (5 mo. or 500 lbs). This will give you strong cows & calves and will cost you the least in feed and suppliments (i.e. feeding a lactating cow and a nursing calf in...
Probably not. Usually a cow in the first stage of labour will show a clear mucous string from her vulva, and show other signs of calving, like loose and floppy vulva, enlarged udder and teats, restlessness, kicking at her belly, etc. It's most likely that she calved Friday night when you weren't...
== Answer ==   If it's wet, it'll get everywhere.
EPD's in Charolais bulls are numbers that tell of what genetics and characteristics that bull can pass on to his offspring. EPDs are based on a breed average when compared to other bulls of the same breed raised on the same feed in the same environment that are of the same age. Average is 0, whereas...
A cow has an average of 1 calf per year after 2 years of age. So, depending on how long she lives for, she may only have one calf then be sent to slaughter, or she may even have as many as 18 or 20 during her lifetime, if she's a good producing cow.
That's normal, nothing to worry about. Depending on what breed the cow is, she may carry the calf until 290 or 293 days of gestation. Late-maturing breeds such as Charolais, Limousin and Maine Anjou will often carry their calves over the 284- or 285-day mark.
It's most likely because, historically, all the cows were bred so that they calved in the spring. Thus, when a cow or heifer was close to calving, it was "coincidence" that it was spring time that the females were ready to give birth, thus the term "springer" was adopted.
Cattle traits means, the characteristics that cattle posses. These traits are what cattle are known for or why the produce the way that they do. For example, Texas longhorns are known for their horn size, this is a trait. Holsteins are known for high milk production, this is also a trait.
If the cow has dried up already, you may have a calf that is close to death in your hands. However you must try to save it. Give it powdered colostrum mixed with water (whatever the directions say on the package), and tube-feed it to the calf. Give the colostrum as often as your local veterinarian...
Cow calf, since it simply means a livestock operation that has cows and calves.
No, they cannot until they are a few years old. Baby cows are just that: babies, children, kids. It's like asking whether a 2 year old child can conceive and have a baby. Logic, naturally, wins out in this question: No, of course not.
Back in the days when cows had to rely entirely on the naturally  occurring grass for food, calves were born in spring so that they  had the whole summer with good eating ahead of them to grow big and  strong to survive winter.
A cow can lactate for as long as a couple years if she is still being milked, or if her calf hasn't been weaned (or she hasn't weaned her calf). However a cow is most productive during her first 3 to 4 months of lactation after parturition.
Depending on the age and weight of that calf, he may drink between 10 and 20 gallons per day.
The length of gestation of a Nguni is quite variable depending on where it's raised and the producer raising them. According to the Nguni Cattle Breeders' Society By-laws, Nguni cattle are allowed to have a minimum gestation period of 266 days and a maximum period of 308 days. See the related link...
  A baby cow is called a calf, a baby sheep is called a lamb