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Cattle Health

Parent Category: Cows and Cattle
Herd health and individual cattle health is important when raising cattle, because a producer needs to know what to do and how to treat a bovine that is sick or injured. There are many diseases and health concerns in the field of raising cattle, and they can be asked and answered here. Be sure to always consult your local licensed large animal veterinarian with concerns about your animals. Your vet is your best source of information.
look at it like weeds when they getting out of hand the you need tocontrol the but you can never really knock out weeds or parasites,
There are many different reasons that a yearling calf could die. Orany cow. !) It was born with a defect that finally killed it. 2) Itcould have contracted a illness that could have killed it.3) Apredator could have killed it, the kind of predator would depend onthe area the calf lived in. 4) It...
I would personally not give them minerals for i am nice to animals
it can suffer from posion snakes
A newborn calf should have colostrum as soon as it is born, because it contains antibodies and immunoglobins that are crucial to the calf's health and immunity to the mass of bacteria and viruses floating around that could make a calf sick. There is a 90% chance that the calf will not survive if he...
FALSE . BSE is caused by a PRION or misfolded protein, NOT a virus.
With cows or bulls, often fixing a broken limb isn't worth the costs invested in getting the treatment to fix such an injury or the labour and time involved in getting it to heal properly. Most, if not all, cows and bulls (and even older calves, at least those that are considered yearlings) are...
Not generally - most cow-calf operators have the skill to give neonatal vaccines to newborn calves themselves without having a veterinarian out to give the shots. This is more economical for the producer, and the calves get the vaccines they need.
ANSWER: Find out what material is in the spinning mechanical action. If its plastic on plastic, use vasoline. If its metal on plastic, use vasoline. If its metal on metal, use a heavy weight oil like car engine oil. Clean the area of any crud or dirt before you relubricate it with clean water and...
Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy: Scrapie in sheep and Mad Cow disease (or Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy)
This can be a result of a nutrient deficiency or lice. You should provide the cow with a higher source of nutrient (either in the feed or a supplement). For the treatment of lice (usually should be done every year depending on your area) a powder can be applied to the back of every animal, your...
Subcutaneous injections are best given half-way up the neck in front of the shoulder, between the shoulder blades or over the ribs well behind the shoulder. NEVER give a subQ shot on the hindquarters! If you are giving it in the neck, it's best to form a tent with one hand, then insert the needle at...
She could be already dead, or very sick and on the verge of death.
You haven't been exposed to blackleg (a Clostridial bacterial infection) as the vaccine is a killed vaccine, but it would be a good idea to keep a close watch on how you feel for the next week and watch the accidental injection site as well. If you start to run a fever or notice swelling, redness or...
There shouldn't be too much risk involved, especially if you abort early enough so that the heifer doesn't have trouble pushing it out. Most cases she should be able to come back into heat and be rebred. Have a vet check her out first though (if you haven't already) in case she has an abnormal...
If it's done for pure entertainment, yes. If it's done for the betterment of the cow's health and longevity--whatever reason a surgical cut must be done on a cow by a farmer who knows what he's doing or a veterinarian--then it is not considered cruel, nor should be, by any standards.
Yes. Cows need to be healthy in order to produce a calf, give milk, and even live a good life. Vaccines and antibiotics are made available whenever an animal is in need of it, but shouldn't be used on an animal if she doesn't need it.
A prion, or misfolded protein caused by genetic mutation.
Because many rescued animals have come from abusive conditions,however, these cattle may have more health problems and a shorterlife span than other cattle. On the average, adult male cattle ("bulls" if not castrated;"steers" if castrated) of breeds such as Angus, Jersey, andHereford weigh between 1...
It depends on what they have prolapsed, since there are three types of prolapses: rectal, uterine, and vaginal. If it is a female that has a uterine prolapse this can be a result of a birthing complication, and may be due to a chemical imbalance that is telling her to continue pushing, or because...
They do not. This is a myth that has been spread around by meth-users in making recipes from certain things in their attempts and making the illegal narcotic crystal methamphetamine.
Yes, if (and only if!!) the milk from these cows are not being used for human consumption.
Okay no offence but what kind of question is that?!
Bacteria can enter a crack or wound in the animal's foot, be it in the hoof bone or the space between the hooves, and start to multiply, creating an infection. This infection can cause the hoof to "rot" if not treated with antibiotics and penicillin as soon as possible.
Acute metritis: accumulation of fluid within the uterus. Clinical endometritis: and infection of the uterus within 21 days of labour Sub clinical endometritis: inflammation of the uterus Pyometra: distension of the uterus in the presence of an active corpus luteum Retained Placenta:...
It should be treated as soon as you discover it. First, you have to milk out the affected quarter as thoroughly as you can, then treat it with an antibioitic preparation. Mammary infusions designed for dairy cows also work well for beef cows. The antibiotic preps come in a plastic syring with a...
You have a 1:1 000 000 chance of contracting "mad cow disease" or CJD (Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, the human form of "Mad Cow disease.") Your chances increase as you get into your 50's and 60's.
Answer . depends: extend of injury acute / chronic, age of injury, and age of person. if this is an acute tear without subluxation or bowstringing of the tendons then you can treat with a splint - wrist will be in neutral position. if it's subluxing or bowstringing with extention of the wrist...
The pancreas in the cow has the same function as that in the human.
I think you've been feed it way too much grain than what it needs. You probably were told by someone that cows need grain, and didn't listen to the other part of the equation that cows need to have hay and grass to eat. Also, it's likely that you haven't provided enough exercise for your pet cow:...
Yes. It is called a prion. It causes other proteins to take the same shape it has. As a result it destroys brain tissue.
There are no known cures for MCD in its human form, which is otherwise known as variant Cruetzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD). Nor are there any cures for MCD in the bovine version, which is otherwise known as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). As a matter of fact, no form of this disease in any...
It's hard to tell what you're trying to ask because either you may be referring to feeding the calf roughage, or "eating" milk. The calf will be able to eat the roughage if it's hungry enough, as many a thrifty calf with intense curiousity (as is with most calves) will find the hay and grain to eat...
What kind of "cow" are you referring to? Is this a young calf or an older cow? Cows refer to mature female bovines. And your "cow" may be ill; not eating is a common symptom of a bovine that is sick.
Mastitis is inflammation from injury or infection, what commercial operations do to prevent this is every they milk, they dip the teats in iodine and they also wipe them off and sterilize them before milking as well, there is no way to stop it from happening but that is one way to minimize it. To...
She could be resting near her calf, expecting another one on the way (which is extremely rare, by the way), or is experiencing some other illness that only your vet should try to diagnose for you, like milk fever, ketosis, grass tetany, or temporary paralysis.
It seems to me that she has nerve damage. Get her to a vet ASAP, if you don't it will become worse and cripple her, she may even die.
No. Scours, or BVD (Bovine Viral Diarrhea) is not a zoonotic illness that can be transmitted from animal to human or vice versa.
No, but a modified live vaccine (MLV) may cause embryo death or an infection of the fetus, especially if you time the vaccinations wrong. But no, it won't cause abortion. A killed vaccine is more safe and effective to vaccinate your cows against BVD. An oil-based killed BVD vaccine is safer and...
Bag Balm, that can be purchased at any store that sells farming supplies,
Charolais have the same immunity to diseases as many other beef cattle have. It all depends on what their immune systems are exposed to and what they are not.
Signs of illness include but is not limited to: . head hung low . eyes seem dull and sunk back . coat will look dull (hair could be falling out) . nose may be cold and dry . diarrhea . decrease in appetite . decrease in milk production . weight loss . low energy levels . abnormal to no rumen...
There is no cure for this disease. Only way to "cure" mad cow disease is to die.
Vaccination is the best way to prevent blackleg.
No more milk or beef would be produced for human consumption. There would be a reason why every cow in the world got sick and died and that reason would probably have severe harm to the human population.
A common misconception is that 80% of antibiotics used in cattle(or livestock in general) are used in humans. The fact of thematter is that to generate such a percentage is not that simple assimply getting some simple percent to wave around in everyone'sfaces. There are many more livestock in North...
For you to eat canned green beans or for them? If it's for you, cattle couldn't care less if you get sick or not. As for them though, it's likely that they won't, but they may get sick if the can is bowed out or past the expiry date, because there's a chance that they may get botulism from it.
Breeches can be quite difficult to correct, so you will have to call your vet to get the calf out for you. Often calves that are backwards or in breech have a less chance of survival than calves that are coming the normally but have a foot or leg back or locked hips. You NEED TO WORK FAST TO SAVE...
There are way more than just two diseases that are common in cattle. Coccidiosis and Shipping Fever are two common ones, as well as Blackleg, BVDV, Acidosis, Bloat, Pneumonia (or BRD), Wooden Tongue, Mastitis, etc.
Remove animals from affected pasture, let graze clean paddock and recovery wil occur in 2-3 days. If Animals are down then feed and water them in a safe area where they are not going to get caught up in fences or drown in dams, until they regain their feet and mobility.
It depends on the reason that they are given antibiotics. Normallycattle only get antibiotics if they are sick with a bacterialinfection (viral and fungal infections will not react toantibiotics), but if they are being fed a grain-rich diet or are atrisk of getting foot-rot, shipping-fever/pnuemonia...
When the calf is not vaccinated for Clostridium spp.. The bacteria are ingested, pass through the wall of the GI tract, and after gaining access to the bloodstream through capillaries joined to the GI tract, are then deposited in muscle and other tissues.
This should've been done six weeks BEFORE the cow calved and started lactating. So no, you can't worm or vaccinate lactating cows.
Twisted gut or twisted abomasum occurs in cows immediately afterbirth, or when they haven't been eating for some time and areexposed to strenuous activity that will move their stomachexcessively. Symptoms include pain (kicking at the belly, movinghead back to the belly), reduced appetite, lethargic...
Mastitis will keep getting worse if it goes untreated, if you begin to treat in the early stage the cow will have mastitis for about a week. It will take longer to treat mastitis as it progresses.
It depends on what illness the cow has. Most likely she'll be quarantined, or separated from the herd, and given penicillin or some other antibiotic to help her battle her infection. But if she has a disease that is not treatable, like Johnes Disease for instance, then she is shipped to the...
Off yellow or green yellow.
Mastitis is an infection in the udder of a cow and can be treated in a variety of ways. Some farmers will let the cow clear the infection herself (no antibiotics given) and will just keep stripping out the milk from the infected quarter multiple times a day to help draw the infection out. Other...
A sick cow will have a high temperature and she will also be off her food, not eating. She will not produce as much milk as she should be and will generally look lethargic
That's a huge red flag for a calf that has a brain injury. Unless you want to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars getting the calf fixed, it's best to put him down.
One possibility is that she may have experienced a false heat, butthis usually only occurs if she's earlier on in her gestation thanin late gestation. Other possibilities are more worrying and suchthat you must contact your veterinarian about to see what could bewrong.
Yes, though the differences aren't all that significant.
Mastitis: this is an infection of the udder, you cannot ship milk that is infected with mastitis Milk fever: after the cow has given birth, she is putting all the calcium in her body into the milk, leaving her deficient in calcium.
If it's a lot, she may have a compacted gut which will require surgery to remove. However, if it's only a little bit, she will be okay, as the wire (or string?) will be digested from the acidic gastric juices that are excreted in the digestive tract.
No not necessarily, if they are out on pasture when it rains they usually go into the woods for shelter, or into the barn if they are in the barnyard. However, if cattle are kept outside in continuous rain with no shelter then they can become ill. They may catch a common cold, pneumonia, or foot rot...
This depends on how long the calf has been dead for. If it's only been for one or two days, the calf should be pulled out. However this can be a very gruesome task , and is definitely not for those that are faint-hearted nor those who have weak stomachs. The reason I say this is because often...
Not especially. Milk and sodium contain somewhat essential nutrients, butthere's nothing synergistic about the two. While sodium is essential for your body to have, it's very easy to consume too much, which can lead to high blood pressure. Milk is a good source of protein, potassium and calcium- but...
Loose mineral is better than a salt block. You can get minerals for cattle at your local feed store. The standard mineral block is the blue block that contains Cobalt and Iodine. Other blocks contain more minerals, such as Selenium, Iron, Manganese, Potassium, Magnesium, Copper, etc. There are also...
Old age, their systems will begin to shut down and they die of natural causes.
It is best to have your veterinarian come and remove them when you first notice them. The vet will cut them off and spray them will an antibacterial spray. If you leave them too long they can continue to grow and the vet may have to freeze the wart in order to remove it.
No, not all. They can see quite well, quite often better than humans can, and can often notice things much sooner or that are not obvious to us than we humans can. Very few, if any, are born blind, but a fair few can become blind from maladies later in life, such maladies as cancer eye or...
Nope. Besides, cow-tipping is an urban myth, and something that is impossible to do, even at the dead of night.
Most heifers should be around 15 to 18 months of age to be receptive and be able to get bred. Of course this depends on the breed and the type of cattle. For dairy cattle, a farmer aims to have a heifer calve by 24 months, or two years of age. The gestation period for a cow is approximately the same...
The best time to give a newborn calf its shots is almost right after it's born, at the same time you tag and castrate (if it's a bull calf) it. Vitamins A, D and E and Selenium (if your area is Se deficient) are the best vaccines to give a newborn calf to help build its immune system and reduce...
Either he has joint ill, or he has a bad abcess on his knee. Either one should see a vet ASAP. It's not worth putting him down if it's something worth fixing. He is a baby yet, and baby calves tend to heal up faster than adult cattle do.
It's a good source of calcium.
Pnuemonia/shipping fever is a very common malady, especially among younger weaned calves.
Stress, exposure to other sick cattle by air or touch, bacteria entering a wound, feed contamination, mineral deficiency, mineral toxicity, genetics, anti-quality factors in forages, etc.
It depends on some factors, most of which are not mentioned in this question. Do the cattle have an injury which allows the flies to lay their eggs and hatch maggots in? Are maggots coming out of the anus? As such several options, all which are mentioned in the related link below, can be of use to...
Mastitis in the udder of a cow (dairy or beef) can be caused by the following: . Bruising on the udder from too much running or from being stepped on by another cow . Unsanitary environment, enabling bacteria to enter the teat canal into the mammary gland tissue of the udder . Wound on the udder...
There's the incisors and the molars, which are "scientific" names for the teeth in a cow. But they're names for the teeth in all other mammals too.
No. Cows willingly come to the milk parlor to be milked, because the milk machines relieve the pain in their udders from being so swollen with milk. If cows would feel pain from being "forcibly" milked from machines, they would be doing everything they can to avoid going to the milking parlour. It's...
An injection of internal parasitic medication will help, or pour-on medication using Ivomec or Ivermectin or anything that your vet would carry. But ask your vet first about how to treat mange before you start experimenting with different parasitic medication products.
Any mineral or vitamin that exceeds the maximum dosage per day is considered toxic to cattle. Any amount of Mercury and Lead and other heavy metals are toxic to cattle, as well as many poisonous plants like Water Hemlock, Rhubarb leaves, Lupine, some species of Vetch, etc.
It depends on how severe the mastitis is. If it's in all four quarters, yes. If the mastitis is just in one quarter, no.
YES, carrot tops do contain toxins!! It is unlikely your animal will be poisoned by feeding them a small amount of carrot top, however, if your animal has been eating any other alkaloid based plants such as "dog fennel" they could become sick and die from alkaloid poisoning! We received a sick...
I believe you mean transformed, as a heifer is a cow, and she instead of he. In that case it would be Io, one of Zeus's lovers.