How many jews did Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin kill combined?

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joseph stalin killed over 123,000 people but he didnt kill any jews
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What did Adolf Hitler use to kill Jews?

He used, gas chambers, crematories, firing squads, lethal injections,. forced labor, starvation, exposure, brutality, disease, and execution.

How did Adolf Hitler kill the Jews?

Many died in in gas chambers Millions of Jews were killed in many various ways, such as: . Stavation - In the ghettos. . Gas Vans - Used at Chelmno and elsewhere. . Machine gunned - into pits the Jews had dug out. . In extermination camps (such as Trelinka, part ofAuschwitz-Birkenau, Sobibor) - where they were gassed orshot. . In harsh concentration camps - where they were worked todeath. He killed them by putting them into gas chambers , also he wouldwork them to death , by not feeding them and making me them workall hours of the day with no food or sleep . Any horrid way you could imagine. Starvation, beatings, poison,burning.

Did Adolf Hitler kill only Jews?

Hitler basicly hated and killed the Jews because they were the largest non-German minority in Central Europe at that time. But he also sent Gypsies and other ethnical minorities to the gas chambers. Hitler wanted a pure Germany without any "parasites". At that time, there were only few Muslims and Africans living in Germany (unlike today). But you can be sure that Hitler would have built exactly the same gas chambers when (instead of Jews) millions of Turks, Arabs, Indians and Africans had lived in Germany at that time. Hitler's basic ideology was not anti-semitism, but racism in its most radical extent. The millions of "Hitler fans" in Arabia and India should always be aware of the fact that they would also be on Hitler's "bug spray list" when they had come to Germany in the 1930s and 1940s.

Who murdered more people Adolf Hitler or Joseph Stalin?

Stalin is responsible for the death of 17 million Russians. Hitler is responsible for the death of 12 million people in both concentration camps and civilians. Alternate opinion: Hitler: Al least 15 million Russian civilians die during Hitler's invasion in USSR. Lots of people in other countries too. Stalin: about 300000 (rounded up) dead during party purges, about 200000 captured Nazi soldiers (died 1945-53).

Why did adolf hitler kill and hate jews?

Hitler thought the germans were superior and they were Christianwhereas the jews followed Judaism. No one could be as good as thegermans and Hitler wouldn't allow anyone to convert to Christianityif they had been Jewish. Hitler considered this "cheating" if youwill. He thought you needed to be born into a life as a CHRISTIANif not they would execute them.

Why did adolf hitler try to kill all the jews?

basically because he could not do anything else with them. He had created a situation where he had concentrated millions of Jews into a corner of Poland and there was not enough food for them. Killing them seemed to be the best solution.

Why did Adolf Hitler kill 6 million jews?

His rationales for killing them as a multitude are no different asa group than as individuals as set out in the Related Questionsbelow. In terms of why it has been capped at 6 million, Hitler was notafforded more time to kill any more. Otherwise, it could easilyhave risen to 8 or 9 million. The best answer is that Hitler also had non-Aryan's of all sortskilled. He exterminated Africans, Gypsies, Homosexuals, "MentallyDeficients", Catholics, Slavs, etc. Because he thought Jews were unworthy. . He blamed the Jews forcausing the defeat of Germany in World War 1. . He blamed the Jews forthe Great Depression. Purely because he literally blamed them for all troubles andproblems with Germany. He desperately wanted to get rid of them anddecided to enforce genocide on them. He nearly succeeded in doingthis and probably would have even more if Japan hadn't reallyscrewed up in their war plans.

How many Jews did Joseph Stalin kill?

\nJoseph Stalin did not intentionally target Jews, but he did amass quite a large amount of killings. Stalin killed over 20 million people in his purges and five-year plans.

When did Adolf Hitler kill jew?

Hitler's plan for the Final solution for the Jewish people began in1942. He began having SS officers shooting, gassing and starvingJews in death camps.

How did Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler become friends?

They never did become friends. Hitler hated all communists and Stalin hated all capitalists. They entered into a Non Aggression Pact before World War 2 began, but it was not because they wanted the world to know they were pals. Hitler wanted it so the Soviet Union would not attack Germany from the east when it attacked France, Belgium and Holland on the west. Stalin wanted it so he could be sure that Germany would not attack it. They both want the pact because it secured their borders and secretly agreed how Poland was to be divided up between them when both Germany and the Soviet Union attacked Poland.

Why did Adolf Hitler think the Jews killed his mom?

He didn't think that, his mother died from breast cancer and Hitler was aware of that.

Why did Adolf Hitler want to kill all the Jews in the Holocaust?

there was little value in only killing some.Hitler killed the Jewsfor more than one reason. The political reason given was that theJews were aligned with the Bolshevik revolution in Russia, and werehence Communists. Communists were feared in Germany for not onlytheir brutality but for what, they feared, was a totalitarian statein which there would be little freedom and the German culture andsociety would be radically changed, and everyone would suffer alower standard of living. Great exhibitions were given to get thatpoint across.

Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler were both what?

1. Dictators who killed a lot of people. 2. Winners of the Time Magazine Person of the Year Award (Hitler in 1938 and Stalin in 1939 & 1942)

How did Adolf Hitler double cross joseph Stalin?

Just the opposite, Stalin doublecrossed Hitler. Both agreed to simultaneously invade Poland as agreed upon in Moscow in 1939. When the appointed time came Stalin held back his army. Germany was forced to take on Poland by itself, weakening its position and drawing the ire of the Western allies. Stalin was very clever and Hitler a bit naive. The attack on The USSR in 1941 by Germany may have appeared suicidal but in fact Hitler really had no choice. He was unable to knock out England in 1940, Germany grew weaker fighting England and knew inevitably the USA would come to their aid. He knew he could not trust Stalin again and before he could build up the Red Army into a powerful threat to attack Germany, Hitler preemptively attacked. It was a long shot gamble, and it failed. In reality the war was already decided in 1939 with Stalin's doublecross of Hitler.

Did Adolf Hitler kill jews?

YES! it is what we hated about him. He killed six million Jews. Healso killed many gypsies, gays, people with disabilities, andpossibly other races. BASICALLY anyone he hated or wasn't Germanenough. He basically murdered anyone different which is ironicconsidering he was too.

Why did Adolf Hitler want to kill the Jews?

Scholars and psychologists have many theories about this. We do know from research that some commonly held beliefs turned out to be myths-- he wasn't part Jewish, he wasn't treated badly by a Jewish doctor, etc. Mainly, he seems to have been an evil, hateful person who wanted to take out his prejudice on a group who made up only about 3% of Germany's population. That said, here are some of the theories from our contributors: Answer 1 From what I've read, he did not want to kill Jews only. He believed that the Aryan race is superior to other races, and wanted to "cleanse" his world for them by killing what he considered inferior, undesirable or dangerous people. During the Holocaust, He killed around 17 million people; 6 million of them were Jews. According to Wikipedia: his victims included Asians, Poles, Slavic people, Africans, gypsies, prisoners of war, Jews, homosexuals, mentally ill and disabled people. Only Jews were killed specifically for their religion (or what people thought back then was their race). Answer 2 Murderous greed. Adolf Hitler resented the Jews. He studied them and thought he understood how they were so successful. It seemed to him that everything the Jews did, whether in music or medicine or law or science or business, flourished and prospered. You name it, they excelled in it. He did not consider that maybe they worked hard or studied hard. He just resented them. Upon entering the concentration camps, an appointed Nazi officer would ask the newly arrived Jew what his/her skill/trade was. He would use their accounting skills to help run the camps. Use their medical skills to ensure the health of the camp's Nazis. If you knew banking, he would use your knowledge and gain instant access to money that would fund his movement. Once captured, the Nazis would seize Jewish homes, bank accounts cars, etc... He utilized every commercial recourse he could get his greedy hands on. When he Nazis had gotten everything they could from the Jews, including slave labor in the camps, they were sent to their deaths. Answer 3 Nobody really knows. But it is said that he thought they were evil and beastly and best kept captivated, which of course is not true. He was sick in the head probably and he thought that non-Aryans/people who weren't tall and blond weren't as good. That is strange because Hitler himself was not tall and blond. Answer 4 To understand this you have to understand Nazism as a political belief. Nazism taught that the nation state was of paramount importance. The individual was less important than the living, nation state. Nazism was nationalism taken to extreme. The the constant talk of expansion, of living room, of superiority of races in the Nazi culture. At the other end of this political spectrum was Communism, a word derived from 'commune', a term often associated with the hippie lifestyle. It doesn't care much for the individual either, but sees the world as a one government entity. The communist does not support the nation state idea. The one government concept means, to them, that all means of production, all farm land, all religion, is controlled by the state. Hitler believed the Jews were dominant in the development and implementation of Communism (this is a myth, but he believed it). In fact, he often spoke of Bolshevik (communist) Jewry. He considered the words interchangeable. He used this as an excuse-- by killing Jews, he believed he was aiding in the destruction of communism. Answer 5 Hitler and the Nazis encouraged the German population to believe that the Jews were the cause of all of Germany's problems. Hitler engrained a myriad of Anti-Semitic beliefs into German Society by making it part of the national curriculum and teaching it to millions of German children; he taught it to adults by use of the media, which was filled with anti-Jewish propaganda. Hitler and the Nazis proposed that the only way to improve Germany was to remove the Jews entirely. There were two options for such a removal: exile or genocide. Since no country was willing to take the Jewish population en masse (and this includes the United States and United Kingdom due to prevailing anti-Jewish prejudice), Hitler and the elite cadre of Nazis made the executive decision to commit genocide to "save Germany". Additionally, killing Jews would allow Hitler and the Nazis to auction off their assets to other Germans, giving loyal citizens better homes or formerly Jewish-run businesses. This increased the citizens' loyalty, made it look like Hitler was making good on his campaign promises to improve the German economy (on a personal view), and increased "German living space" called lebensraum . Answer 6 After World War I, Hitler was looking for a way to gather people together, as to rally them for dominating the world. The best way he saw that he could do this, is creating a common enemy that his people could learn to hate and attack. He decided the Jews made a good enemy; there were Jewish communities throughout Europe and he convinced people in Germany to fear the Jews and blame them for Germany's situation; he was able to get people to rally around that idea. Answer 7 Hitler was an insecure and ill man, who chose to believe that one should live by his beastly nature and not resist it. Hitler believed that the Jews, being successful in many scientific and academic groups in Germany, were actually parasites trying to take over. With his warped perspective and paranoid nature, Hitler decided that no one should be as successful as the Aryan race, which was the dominant race in Germany. Answer 8 One belief is that Hitler killed the Jewish people because he blamed them for Germany losing World War I. Another belief is that Hitler saw the Jewish people as a fault in the perfect race which was he was trying to create with the perfect empire. He saw them as subhuman and a threat to the ideal Aryan race. Answer 9: Here are Hitler's Own Words (bear in mind that what he believes are not true statements about Jews or Economics, but they reflect the kinds of propaganda he fed to the German people): "We were not foolish enough to try to make a currency coverage of gold of which we had none, but for every mark that was issued we required the equivalent of a mark's worth of work done or goods produced. . . .we laugh at the time our national financiers held the view that the value of a currency is regulated by the gold and securities lying in the vaults of a state bank." -Adolf Hitler, 1937 (CC Veith, Citadels of Chaos, Meador, 1949.) . "And it proved sound. It worked. In less than ten years Germany became easily the most powerful state in Europe. It worked so magically and magnificently that it sounded the death knell of the entire (Zionist) Jewish money system. World Jewry knew that they had to destroy Hitler's system, by whatever means might prove necessary, or their own [system of usury] would necessarily die. And if it died, with it must die their dream and their hope of making themselves masters of the world. The primary issue over which World War II was fought was to determine which money system was to survive. At bottom it was not a war between Germany and the so-called allies. Primarily it was war to the death between Germany and the International Money Power." --William Gayley Simpson, 'Which Way Western Man' (p.642) . Answer 10 I believe there were deeper, more philosophical reasons for what Hitler claimed he had to do in order to "save" Germany. Hitler was involved in the Thule society, where he came to believe that the Aryan race was the chosen people. [Note from a historian: not everyone accepts this; there is NO credible evidence he was a member, nor that he ever attended their meetings.] But whether he was a member or not, he did share many of their beliefs, especially about the importance of Aryan purity, the belief in Aryan superiority, and the need to root out and destroy "inferior" cultures which has "cursed" the Aryans. In this view, Germany would never prosper until "Jewish magic" which had condemned Germany to misery, was finally destroyed, leaving a pure society.

Why did adolf Hitler kill Jews and other people?

because they where different and because his what Germany for German people and no one else. if you have other information people use WikiAnswers research button which is easy to use and no hassle

Why did Adolf Hitler kill the Jews?

Answer 1 The reason why Hitler hated, targeted and killed the Jews was because that: . He regarded (most) Jews as Communists. . He blamed the Jews for causing the defeat of Germany in World War 1. . He blamed the Jews for the Great Depression. . They claimed that the Jews were a morally and culturally corrupting influence. . He believed that the Jews were conspiring to rule the world. . He also believed that the Jews already, to a large extent, controlled Germany. . He believed that they were racially inferior and were in some sense 'contaminating' non-Jewish Germans and he wanted a Germany and a Europe without Jews. . However, this is at odds with the view that they were extremely cunning and were 'already controlling Germany'. Answer 2 Hitler killed the Jews for more than one reason. The political reason given was that the Jews were aligned with the Bolshevik revolution in Russia, and were hence Communists. Communists were feared in Germany for not only their brutality but for what, they feared, was a totalitarian state in which there would be little freedom and the German culture and society would be radically changed, and everyone would suffer a lower standard of living. Great exhibitions were given to get that point across. Publicly, Hitler did not talk about 'killing' the Jews, but about deporting them. He felt they were 'a people without a fatherland', and that all people, particularly 'Aryan' people and particularly German 'Aryans' were tied to their land in an almost spiritual way. To prosper, Hitler and the neo-pagans of the Third Reich felt that Germany had to be 'cleansed' of the people who were a 'nation within a nation' , and his first efforts were toward deportation. Germany looked into Madagascar off the eastern coast of Africa, but it was impractical. Nazi propagandists began to portray the Jew as the epitome of all evil and the reason for all the defeat and societal ills in Germany. He reasoned that their influence was evil and degenerate, and that they had caused Germany to lose WWI, had ruined the arts, were defiling bloodlines, bringing in disease, introducing communism, etc and that if conditions were left to themselves, would threaten the overthrow of Germany. The Jews were actually a small proportion (525,000) of citizens when the Nazis came to power in 1933, compared to approximately 62 million others in Germany. The real reason almost has to lie in the firm belief that the Aryan herrenvolk [Master Race] could not emerge fully until the Jews and their influence were removed. While it was debated for decades whether the mass Killings were planned, scholars today have amassed such a large amount of data and information, as to make that position beyond doubt. Hitler espoused the desire early on to destroy the Jews of Europe and create a New European Order, and the Wannsee Conference and Operation Reinhard , along with the lagers and Einsatzgruppen made it clear that the systematic destruction of the Jews of Europe was the clear intent. Additional Causes of Anti-Semitism In addition, in the wake of the Russian Revolution, all kinds of fanciful conspiracy theories claiming that "the Jews" were using Communism to achieve world domination became quite popular in some places. In Britain and the US they were not taken particularly seriously by mainstream politicians, but in Germany this kind of stuff was seized on eagerly by the Nazis. ____ The first people to be sent to concentration were known political opponents of the Nazis. 'Outsider' groups such as homosexuals were also persecuted. The Jews were subject to a massive program of extermination and a total of about six million were murdered in the Holocaust. Hatred of the Jews was long standing in many parts of Europe. (America wasn't free of Anti-Semitism, either). The Jews were the traditional scapegoats. Originally, Anti-Semitism had been directed mainly against Judaism and its adherents, but from the 1870s onwards it became racial and ideological. The period from about 1870 onwards was one of rapid change (urbanization and a further wave of industrialism). Many people who disliked these changes or could not adapt to them identified the Jews with Modernism. In addition, in Europe there was a severe economic depression from 1873-1879 (and arguably much longer). Answer 3 It was, above all, conspiracy theories about "the Jews". These had been circulated in Russia from about 1900-1917 by the Tsarist secret police. After about 1918 they also circulated increasingly in Western and Central Europe. After World War 1 there were all kinds of conspiracy theories circulating about the Jews. They were widely regarded as Communists and subversives. In Germany and Austria there was a widespread view (for which there was no evidence) that they had engineered the defeat of Germany. There were also conspiracy theories claiming that the Jews were seeking to dominate the world. Answer 4 This question implicitly has two parts. The first is a question as to the rationales that Hitler believed in to justify Anti-Semitic beliefs and the second is a question as to why Hitler felt the need to kill the Jews as a way to solve these Anti-Semitic concerns. The Reasons for Anti-Semitism in Germany during that period are numerous, but some of the more important reasons were the following: 1) Decay of the German State: During the 1800s, Jews began to become more integrated in German National Life. They served in its government, its military divisions, and its industry. As was typical of Western Europe, the Jews had more of a hand in the higher echelons of government than their population percentage would account for. The Nazis saw this increasing Jewish percentage in the government as a slow takeover of German policy and a corruption of the German people. They contrasted the great victories under Bismarck with the depressing failure of World War I and noted how a much larger percentage of soldiers in the latter war were Jewish. There was also the sentiment than in the early 20th century, values were beginning to ebb (this is similar to current politics in the United States) and the Jewish integration in the German apparatus (becoming teachers, lawyers, doctors, etc.) was to blame for this recession of values as opposed to modernity as a process. 2) Nationalism: Germany was brought together under the Nationalist conception that all peoples with German culture, history, and language should be united regardless of which principality currently held control. The German self-conception also had an ethnic component, holding that the perfect German was blond and blue eyed. Regardless of the fact that the majority of Germans were dark haired, Jews stuck out like a sore thumb because they overwhelmingly had darker hair. In addition, the idea of a German Jew was still rather new and both Jews and non-Jews tended to see the Jews in Germany as being part of a vast Jewish network and that these Jews just happened to be in Germany. The Nazis capitalized on this cosmopolitan sensibility by claiming that Jews' allegiances were not to the German State, but to secret Jewish Councils organizing world events. 3) Economy: Whether it was true or not, there was perception among Germans and the Nazis in particular that Jews were wealthy individuals and had a higher per-capita income than the Germans. In many ways (because of the above two reasons) Germans felt that the Jews were "stealing" their money while they were poor and suffering. 4) Pseudo-Science: The late 19th and early 20th century was filled with radical new ideas concerning Social Darwinism. It was believed by the Pseudo-Scientific community (which was rather in vogue) that different groups of people or races exhibited different emotional traits that were linked to physical differences. This led to the belief that Jews were corrupt and thieving by their irreversible nature and that they could not be "cured" and brought up as proper Europeans. This formalized Racial Anti-Semitism in Germany and made the situation much more dire for German Jews. 5) Heresy: Although not as much an issue in World War II as it may have been 500 years prior, Jews were still considered the heretics who murdered the LORD and Savior. This helped to justify Anti-Semitism as the Jewish comeuppance for their accepting of the Christ Bloodguilt. 6) Hatred: (written by someone else) Because ppl hated them . . . . .not such a good reason, right? Its so sad . . . . . . Why was killing the Jews necessary? The answer to the second part, while cold, is brutally honest. The Nazis encouraged the German population to believe that this myriad of Anti-Semitic issues was ingrained in German Society by making it part of the national curriculum and teaching it to millions of German children. The Nazis proposed that the only way to improve Germany was to remove the Jews entirely. There were two options for such a removal: exile or genocide. Since no country was willing to take the Jewish population en masse (and this includes the United States and United Kingdom due to prevailing stereotypes there) the Nazis made the executive decision to commit genocide to "save Germany". Answer 5 The NSDAP executed many members of various groups, such as Jews, homosexuals, gypsies and others exact reason for each group is up for debate, but I'd guess a mixture of political antisemitism and wanting to create a sense of unity among the German people by pitting them all against the Jews. Answer 6 for fun... seriously no reason he needed someone to blame for the downfall of Germany and no body could stop him in his gov. because he was supreme chancler and would kill you if you spoke out against him First, Hitler did not only kill Jews. The Nazi's also killed basically any race they saw as "unfit" or a political view they opposed. The whole idea was to have a pure German race. Poles, Jews, Russians, Gypsy, Ukrainian, Blacks where all subject to murder and mistreatment in the hands of the Nazi's. Hitler blamed the Jews for financial problems in Germany, control of media, basically a scapegoat for any and all problems the German people endured, especially after the end of the First World War which left Germany bankrupt. What was ironic was the German Jews who where persecuted had lived in Germany for 100's of years and saw themselves just as much German as Jewish. They loved their country and where dumbfounded at first by Hitler's views and extreme persecution. Answer 7 Hilter and the Nazi killed Jews because: Hitler hated the Jews and everyone who wasn't like him! He killed most of the Jews to 'create a better world' for everyone or more likely for himself!!!! Answer 8 Sir Arthur Keith was a British anthropologist, an atheistic evolutionist and an anti-Nazi, but he drew this chilling conclusion: "The German Führer, as I have consistently maintained, is an evolutionist; he has consciously sought to make the practice of Germany conform to the theory of evolution." Reference Keith, A., Evolution and Ethics, Putnam, NY, USA, p. 230, 1947. Answer Because hating the Jews was the norm then especially in Europe. When the news of the Holocaust came out, the Christian fathers (of all denomination) did nothing to condemn or stop it. "In his (Hitler) day, hatred of Jews was the norm. In great measure it was sponsored by the two major religions of Germany, Catholicism and Lutheranism. He greatly admired Martin Luther, who openly hated the Jews. Luther condemned the Catholic Church for its pretensions and corruption, but he supported the centuries of papal pogroms against the Jews. Luther said, "The Jews deserve to be hanged on gallows seven times higher than ordinary thieves," and "We ought to take revenge on the Jews and kill them." "Ungodly wretches" he calls the Jews in his widely read Table Talk. source; see link "religion of Hitler on left" on Comment on the Religion of Hitler It seems to be clear from the above link that Hitler had connections with the Roman Catholic church. At the same time it is clear that Hitler persecuted Christians (among others) who did not agree with him. Not all Christians were actually anti-semitic, as true Christians realize that Jesus Christ was himself a Jew. Jesus himself indicated that Christians were to suffer persecution as indeed they did from the martyrdoms of Stephen and James onwards through the Roman Emperors, the Inquisition, Hitler and Stalin and down to this present day in China and Burma, Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia, Nigeria and Pakistan etc. Christians were never, even though their teaching would frequently meet opposition and would sadly split families, to be the perpetrators of violence. They were taught to 'turn the other cheek.' Hitler and his Nazis specifically mocked this aspect of the Christian faith as they saw it as a sign of weakness, definitely not part of the 'master race' they were seeking to produce. There are therefore conclusions which may be drawn regarding the position of the Roman Catholic church at this time. Whatever the reasons for their position, it clearly was not Christian. Answer Undoubtedly Hitler was violently anti-semitic. It seems that he drew his motivation from a number of sources. The religious connection is interesting because the Nazis always sought to control the churches (like most other things) particularly because they recognized that there was potential at least for strong opposition to arise from this source. Many church leaders either gave in to their demands or left the country when they saw what was coming. Others like Bonhoeffer joined the resistance and paid the ultimate price. The infiltration of Nazi ideology into the churches involved a radical re-interpretation of Christian theology, Hitler himself almost becoming a messiah-like figure to 'save' Germany. Hitlers evolutionary motivations are also well-documented and there is a clear connection. What is not clear is whether he actually believed personally in the theory of evolution or whether it was merely a vehicle to justify his hatred of the Jews and that he therefore 'used' evolutionary theory as he 'used' the churches. Probably the major difference which must be noted is that Christian theology does not justify either anti-semitism or murder, whereas the evolutionary 'nature red in tooth and claw' and the horrific eugenics theories which also arose from it are certainly consistent with Darwinism as abhorrent as this may seem. The quote from Sir Arthur Keith, himself an evolutionist, is quite honest in this regard. Answer 9 because he blamed them for Germany's difficulties during post WW1 depression,so he eventually went completely insane & attempted to annihilate that ethnic group. Answer 10 Hitler and his army actually did outright kill Jews. Places Jews were killed include: . in their homes . in the streets . inside businesses . anyplace they tried to meet for religious services . in 'hiding places' such as in friends' homes . in the 'Ghetto' to where Hitler forced Jews to move . on trains to concentration camps, either by gunshot or by the conditions on the trains, in cattle cars with no ventilation . on long marches to camps, including weaker people who couldn't keep up . anyone who didn't obey, anywhere . at "check points" - which were all over History tells us that Hitler began slowly, which is what many dictators do. By slowly indoctrinating the Germans, he persuaded many more people to agree with his views. HOWEVER, some Germans never agreed with Hitler's politics or policies. Please see the Related Questions which give a more complete idea as to why Hitler did kill Jews. Answer 12 He didn't kill them for power. He already had control of them and still killed them.He thought they were an inferior race and should be destroyed. Answer 13 Adolf Hitler hated and wanted to kill the Jews because he blamed them for the loss of the first World War. Because of Hitler, many Jews were part of a genocide. Answer 14 Hitler ordered the destruction of millions of Jews because he was limited in his scope of human compassion. He used racist and hurtful propaganda to brainwash millions into following his plan for Aryan domination. Hitler killed the Jews because he claimed that they had turned against Germany during the First War. Also, he feared German expansion. hitler killed the jews because he believed they were communist, and behind the downfall of germany in WWI. the jews saved their money, and in europe's depression, they were the only population who flourished. this angered hitler, and he got others to rally behind him against jews. also, it's been said that hitler's perfect race of people, the arian race, did not include jews, gypsies, or communists, so he had them exterminated; hitler believed he was cleansing the world of "scum". Answer 15 Hitler wanted to kill the Jewish race because he believed they were the cause of Germany's problems. He also thought the Aryan race was the best so there did not need to be another race competing against them.

Why did Adolf Hitler want to kill the Jews when he was a Jew?

The question assumes that Hitler was "Jewish" or at least ofJewish origin, but there is absolutely no evidence for this. Answer 1 I would rather post this else where but those answers are fixed.Hitler killed the Jews for the following reasons: . He regarded (most) Jews as Communists. . He blamed the Jews for causing the defeat of Germany in WorldWar 1. . He blamed the Jews for the Great Depression. . They claimed that the Jews were a morally and culturallycorrupting influence. . He believed that the Jews were conspiring to rule theworld. . He also believed that the Jews already, to a large extent,controlled Germany. . He believed that they were racially inferior and were in somesense 'contaminating' non-Jewish Germans. However, this is at oddswith the view that they were extremely cunning and were 'alreadycontrolling Germany' Answer 2 The above was Hitler's propaganda, we cannot know the extent towhich Hitler believed himself. None of these accusation warrantedthe holocaust since restricting Jews to ghettos and transportingthem out of the fatherland already accomplished victory over theJews. It is well known that Hitler was an Artist. Hitler killed the Jews because he had an a grand vision ofGermany, that did not include Jews. Hitler preyed upon prejudicesof the Germany and bad economy to popularize the elimination ofJews, so that his vision could be realized. Read more at the Related Link below. There is no evidence at all that Hitler was partly of Jewishorigin. The rumor was current in the period c. 1920-50 aspropaganda intended to make him look a hypocrite. The supposition underlying this question, namely that Hitler waspart Jewish, is incorrect. Hitler was Austrian and while there issome speculation that his grandmother may have been Jewish, theevidence contradicts this. Hitler wanted to kill the Jews becausehe was inspired by racist pseudo-scientific thought as are many whohave a similar perspective today. Answer 3 The events affecting the Jews of Europe during the Nazi era were aculmination of centuries of mistrust, and abuse; Jews were oftenaccused of being the source of societies' problems; they were theuniversal scapegoat. The antisemitic writings of Martin Luther fromthe mid 1500s in Germany, were often quoted or paraphrased byHitler in speeches. Adolf Hitler's "hatred" of the Jews was one of the tools he used toconvince the people of Germany that he knew the source of theireconomic problems and that he was the person who could correct thesituation. He chose to use the long standing antisemitism inGermany to gain the people's support. The Jews were a target ofopportunity; antisemitism was a useful tool to reach his goals.

Why did Adolf Hitler start killing off Jews?

Adolf Hitler had a long standing prejudice with the Jewish people. Beginning with his life in Vienna, which was a hot spot for Jewish prejudice. What's interesting to note is that for a good part of his early life in Vienna he worked with Jewish people, and was even good friends with several. To answer this question you have to look at a lot of different factors. First of all Hitler did not want to be drafted for the first World War while he was in Austria, so he fled to Munich, Germany. The Austrian government tracked him down and told him that if he didn't serve they would fine him and throw him in jail. The funny thing was that when he reported for his service he was deemed to frail, and small to be of any use; unfit for battle. Hitler did eventually serve in WWI, with the distinction of having almost lost his life on several occasions. At this point in his life he was beginning to see Jews as, quite literally, the root of all evil. Most notably beginning when Jewish soldiers temporarily blinded him with Mustard Gas in battle. He was sent to the German Worker's Party, initially as a spy. The party's radical ideals mirrored Hitler's. He quickly moved up the ranks of the party, creating the Nazis, or the "brown shirts" (the main part of Nazi Germany's force). He ran to become leader of Germany against Hindenburg, he made a deal with Hindenburg: in exchange for his political support he would be made Chancellor. He succeeded Hindenburg upon his death in 1934. He then moved to recreate the economy, re-militarize the German state (beginning with the armament of the citizen), once his armies were rebuilt from the ground up he began his persecution. At first beginning by closing Jewish shops, running them out of their homes, and general small scale hate-crimes. Eventually this gained momentum and turned into the tragedy of the Holocaust.

Where did Adolf Hitler kill the Jews?

Adolf Hitler killed over 4 million Jews at concentration camps, in Germany and Poland. Prior to the construction of the concentration and death camps, there were elite units called Einsatzgruppen who would be responsible for finding Jews in the villages where they lived and summarily execute them regardless of age, gender, or militancy. The Einstazgruppen were responsible for over 1 million deaths. In total, between the concentration camps, death camps, and the Einsatzgruppen, 6 million Jews died.

Why did Adolf Hitler kill millions of Jews?

His rationales for killing them as a multitude are no different asa group than as individuals. Those rationales are set out in theRelated Questions below.

Why did Adolf Hitler kill so many Jews?

Adolf Hitler hated the Jews because when he was part of World War 1, he thinks that the Jews were the ones that made them lose the war.

Why did Adolf Hitler kill the Jews when he was one?

Answer There is no evidence that Hitler was in any sense Jewish. The onlybasis for this legend is a highly suspect supposition aboutHitler's father, which even if true still wouldn't have made Hitlera "Jew" by either German or Jewish standards. That removes theunderlying premise of the question, but if you're still interestedin "why" you can skip the discussion below and go straight to theend. Longer Discussion After the war, Hitler's lawyer Hans Frank claimed to have been toldby Hitler that certain people were trying to blackmail him abouthis "supposed Jewish ancestry." Frank further claimed to haveinvestigated this in an attempt to disprove it, but there were someirregularities in Hitler's ancestry that made this difficult. The key factor has to do with Hitler's father Alois Hitler. Aloiswas born to an unmarried woman named Maria Schicklgruber (spellingsof that last name vary). Maria later married, and Alois was adoptedby, Johann Georg Hiedler. When the name change was processed, Aloisbecame Alois Hitler (spelling, especially of names, appears to havebeen rather ad libitum in 19th century Austria). The question then becomes: who was Alois' father? Johann GeorgHiedler is the most likely candidate. An alternative theorysupposes that it may have been Johann Georg's brother JohannNepomuk Hüttler (see last parenthetical comment about spelling, anddon't get me started on "Let's name all our sonsJohann!"). This theory claims that Hüttler (who was married) had an affairwith Maria and then later foisted her off on his brother Hiedler.Proponents cite the fact that some time before Maria's death (whenAlois was about 10) Hüttler took Alois in and raised him forseveral years, and also granted him a substantial inheritance inhis will. Against this must be weighed the fact that, if true, itmeans that Hiedler was willing to marry someone just to cover uphis brother's indiscretions, which is perhaps a bit harder toswallow than an uncle simply being kind to his nephew. However, for our purposes it doesn't actually matter much which ofthe Johanns was Adolf's grandfather, since neither of them wereJewish. The Jewish part comes in due to Frank introducing a thirdpossibility. Frank claimed to have found evidence that Maria workedin the home of a Jewish family in the town of Graz namedFrankenburger. He speculated that the 19-year-old son LeopoldFrankenburger may have been the person to get Maria pregnant. However, the only basis for this theory is Frank's speculation,which has going against it that the Jews had been expelled from theprovince in which Graz was located several centuries before this,and were not allowed to return until several decades after Alois'birth. There were also no records of any family named Frankenburgeror anything similar living in Graz at the time, and Frank managedto get several other key facts (such as Maria's birthplace) wrongas well. The modern conclusion is that Frank, who remained a fanaticalanti-Semite even after renouncing Nazism, was attempting to portrayHitler as a "Jew" (actually, under German law, a "second degreeMischling") and not a pure-blooded "Aryan" so that he could claim"It wasn't a 'real German' (well, Austrian , but stillethnically Germanic) that did all those horrible things, he wasactually one of them !" Also, the German laws defining Jews and Mischlings allowed eitherthe Führer or Reichskanzler to exempt any given person from thoseclassifications. Hitler held both of these positions, soin the extremely unlikely event that Frank's supposition wascorrect, he could have simply declared himself to be a pure-bloodedAryan. In short, the preponderance of the evidenceis that Hitler was basically a pure German-Austrian. You must knowthat in Southern Germany and Austria more than half of thepopulation have brown or black hair (such as Hitler himself). Onlyin Northern Germany is the portion of blond-haired population morethan 70%. So, the fact that Hitler was not blond and blue-eyed doesnot mean that he was a Jew. Why Hitler basicly targeted the Jews because they were the largestnon-German ethnic minority in Central Europe at that time. Hitlerwanted a pure Germany without any "parasites". At that time, there were very few Muslims and Africans living inGermany (unlike today). But you can be sure that Hitler would havebuilt exactly the same gas chambers when (instead of Jews) millionsof Turks, Arabs, Indians and Africans had lived in Germany at thattime. Substantiating evidence is the Nazi treatment of the Roma("gypsies") and condemnation of "Negermusik" (jazz and swing, andyou can probably guess what it literally means). Hitler's basic ideology was not anti-Semitism specifically, butracism in its most radical extent. The millions of Indian and Arab"fans" of Hitler should always be aware that they would also be onHitler's "bug spray list" if they had lived in Germany in the 1930sand 1940s. Tom Lehrer's song "National Brotherhood Week" contains the lyrics "Oh, the Catholics hate the Protestants, And the Protestants hate the Catholics, And the Hindus hate the Muslims, And everybody hates the Jews." This isn't anti-Semitism on Lehrer's part; as American readersmight have suspected from the name, Lehrer was of Jewish heritagehimself. It is, however, more or less Truth in Television for mostof the world in the period leading up to World War II. Jews were, at best , tolerated in most places in Europe (the word"ghetto" originally comes from the name for the part of Venicewhere Jews were permitted to live), so Hitler was partiallypiggybacking on an existing dislike of the Jews, and they provideda convenient scapegoat (ironically, a term with Jewish origins) toblame Germany's problems on.

Where in the world did Adolf Hitler and his men kill the Jews in the holocaust?

The six major extermination camps were in Nazi-occupied Poland. There was also one in Belarus, which was also under Nazi occupation from 1941-1944.. When the Nazis invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941, mobile killing squads followed and slaughtered Jews behind the lines in Lithuania, Latvia, Belarus, Ukraine and Russia.

Did Joseph Stalin kill to get rid of Jews?

Stalin was probably not out to eliminate the Jews as a race of people the way Hitler wanted to do. But Stalin still wanted to get rid of as many Jews as possible and tried his best to do so..

Who killed more Jews Hitler or Stalin?

The Nazis - easily. There was some persecution of Jews in the Soviet Union towards the end of Stalin's rule, but no holocaust.

Why did Adolf Hitler kill all of the Jews?

Answer 1 There are three problems with that question: He did not kill all of the Jews because he did not try to kill allof the Jews. The only Jews that were targeted were those underGerman control. Even though Jews were killed from other Axiscountries, most of them were sent voluntarily, or even paid theGermans to take them. Next you have to disassemble whether the murder of the Jews was atthe behest of Hitler, or whether it was done under the impressionthat it was what Hitler would have wanted, or whether it was doneout of some kind of necessity. Whereas it is clear what happened,making assumptions about why it happened is a mistake. The question makes two incorrect assumptions, as such the best answer is: He didn't. Answer 2 It was because he felt that they where inferior. He also killledmentally challenged ppl. Answer 3 The only person qualified to answer that question fully andaccurately, without speculation, killed himelf on April 30, 1945. Answer 4 The question assumes that Hitler and the Nazis killed the entireJewish people; this is not correct. The Nazis killed roughly 30-40%of the world's Jewish community and roughly 60-70% of the EuropeanJewish community. European Jewry was around 9 million in 1933, ofwhom Hitler killed just over 6 million during the Holocaust. Thereason that he did not kill all of the Jews was because he didn'tconquer the entire world and because he lost the war. As for why hestrove to kill the Jews, that question implicitly has two parts.The first is a question as to the rationales that Hitler believedin to justify Anti-Semitic beliefs and the second is a question asto why Hitler felt the need to kill the Jews as a way to solvethese Anti-Semitic concerns. The Reasons for Anti-Semitism in Germany duringthat period are numerous, but some of the more important reasonswere the following: 1) Decay of the German State: During the 1800s,Jews began to become more integrated in German National Life. Theyserved in its government, its military divisions, and its industry.As was typical of Western Europe, the Jews had more of a hand inthe higher echelons of government than their population percentagewould account for. The Nazis saw this increasing Jewish percentagein the government as a slow takeover of German policy and acorruption of the German people. They contrasted the greatvictories under Bismarck with the depressing failure of World War Iand noted how a much larger percentage of soldiers in the latterwar were Jewish. There was also the sentiment than in the early20th century, values were beginning to ebb (this is similar tocurrent politics in the United States) and the Jewish integrationin the German apparatus (becoming teachers, lawyers, doctors, etc.)was to blame for this recession of values as opposed to modernityas a process. 2) Nationalism: Germany was brought together underthe Nationalist conception that all peoples with German culture,history, and language should be united regardless of whichprincipality currently held control. The German self-conceptionalso had an ethnic component, holding that the perfect German wasblond and blue eyed. Regardless of the fact that the majority ofGermans were dark haired, Jews stuck out like a sore thumb becausethey overwhelmingly had darker hair. In addition, the idea of aGerman Jew was still rather new and both Jews and non-Jews tendedto see the Jews in Germany as being part of a vast Jewish networkand that these Jews just happened to be in Germany. The Naziscapitalized on this cosmopolitan sensibility by claiming that Jews'allegiances were not to the German State, but to secret JewishCouncils organizing world events. 3) Economy: Whether it was true or not, there wasperception among Germans and the Nazis in particular that Jews werewealthy individuals and had a higher per-capita income than theGermans. In many ways (because of the above two reasons) Germansfelt that the Jews were "stealing" their money while they were poorand suffering. 4) Pseudo-Science: The late 19th and early 20thcentury was filled with radical new ideas concerning SocialDarwinism. It was believed by the Pseudo-Scientific community(which was rather in vogue) that different groups of people orraces exhibited different emotional traits that were linked tophysical differences. This led to the belief that Jews were corruptand thieving by their irreversible nature and that they could notbe "cured" and brought up as proper Europeans. This formalizedRacial Anti-Semitism in Germany and made the situation much moredire for German Jews. 5) Heresy: Although not as much an issue in WorldWar II as it may have been 500 years prior, Jews were stillconsidered the heretics who murdered the LORD and Savior. Thishelped to justify Anti-Semitism as the Jewish comeuppance for theiraccepting of the Christ Bloodguilt. Why was killing the Jews necessary? The answer to the second part, while cold, is brutally honest. TheNazis encouraged the German population to believe that this myriadof Anti-Semitic issues was ingrained in German Society by making itpart of the national curriculum and teaching it to millions ofGerman children. The Nazis proposed that the only way to improveGermany was to remove the Jews entirely. There were two options forsuch a removal: exile or genocide. Since no country was willing totake the Jewish population en masse (and this includes the UnitedStates and United Kingdom due to prevailing stereotypes there) theNazis made the executive decision to commit genocide to "saveGermany".

Did Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler ever have a fistfight?

No, they never met face to face, not even when the Non-Aggression Pact between Germany and the Soviet Union was signed. However, there was an unsubstantiated report that when Hitler launched Operation Barbarossa invading Russia with over 4 million troops, there was a telephone conversation in which Stalin and Hitler called each other names.

What made Adolf Hitler want to kill all the Jews?

It depends on how you read the question. If the question is asking: What was Hitler's motivation for wanting to kill the Jews? , the answer is: Some would say, that when Hitler got rejected from the Art School he wanted to join, he got mad, and some other people say that the person who rejected him at the school was Jewish. The real deal, is that Hitler wrote Mein Kampf during his time in jail, supposedly he blamed the Jews for everything, including the loss of WW1. I think it is a political way for him to be in control and rally more people he support his idea of taking the Jews out and blaming him. Since people, after WW1 were very depressed and wrecked, he would then need to rise and take over Germany, and plan revenge on the Allies and what they did to Germany, also known as WW2. Another common belief is that Hitler's dad was very abusive and life threatening, his mother couldn't do anything, and he would get abused a lot. He might've gotten his bad habits and easy temper from his dad. If the question is asking: What compelled Hitler to kill Jews? , the answer is: Nobody made Hitler do anything. Hitler was very aware and cognizant of everything he said and everything he did. He was an incredible orator, able to motivate tens of thousands of people with his passionate beliefs about the greatness of the German people. He was well aware of how effective he was in galvanizing support for his atrocities and planned elaborate systems for maintaining the bureaucracy that drove it. He also spent a lot of time and effort in developing the ideology that would drive this hatred. Hitler was not a machine, but a man and a very passionate one who freely chose to commit one of the greatest atrocities in history.

Is there any grave memorial to Adolf Hitler or Joseph Stalin?

Adolf Hitler After committing suicide on 30 April, 1945, Hitler's and Eva Braun's bodies were hurriedly burned in the grounds of the Reichs Chancery but not totally destroyed. On 2 May, 1945, ther Red Army overran the Chancery and members of SMERSH (Russian counter-intelligence) discovered the remains of Hitler, Braun and two dogs in a shell crater. His body was innitially buried in Berlin and then later in Magdeburg, on 21 February 1946, along with those of Eva Braun, Joseph Goebbels, his wife and six children. His body was then secretly exhumed for the final time on 4 April 1970, one of "10 or 11 bodies...in an advanced state of decay", crushed and burned and the ashes scattered in the Biederitz River, to prevent his final resting place becoming a shrine to neo-nazis Joseph Stalin Following his death on 5 March 1953, Stalin"s body was embalmed and put on public display in the Lenin Mausoleum in Red Square until 31 October 1961, when he was buried next to the Kremlin wall (see related link below).

An issue on which Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler did not agree on?

The issue on which Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler did not agree on was property ownership

What does Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin and Benito Mussolini have in common?

what they have in common is is that they were all dictators in one place or another Hitler was responsible of the deaths of 6 million Jews Stalin in my case was the good guy and Mussolini he was just a dictator !

Did Joseph Stalin meet Adolf Hitler?

During WW2 Stalin had an allience during the start of the war. Stalin greatly admired Hitler before Hitler betrayed him. I don't know if they met personally.

Why did Adolf Hitler hate Joseph Stalin?

The easiest way to put it is - Fascists didn't like communists and vice versa, but not just "because they were enemies".

Why did adolf Hitler and the Nazis kill the Jews?

This question implicitly has two parts. The first is a question asto the rationales that the Hitler and the Nazis believed in tojustify Anti-Semitic beliefs and the second is a question as to whyHitler and the Nazis felt the need to kill the Jews as a way tosolve these Anti-Semitic concerns. The Reasons for Anti-Semitism in Germany duringthat period are numerous, but some of the more important reasonswere the following: 1) Decay of the German State: During the 1800s,Jews began to become more integrated in German National Life. Theyserved in its government, its military divisions, and its industry.As was typical of Western Europe, the Jews had more of a hand inthe higher echelons of government than their population percentagewould account for. Hitler and the Nazis saw this increasing Jewishpercentage in the government as a slow takeover of German policyand a corruption of the German people. They contrasted the greatvictories under Bismarck with the depressing failure of World War Iand noted how a much larger percentage of soldiers in the latterwar were Jewish. There was also the sentiment than in the early20th century, values were beginning to ebb (this is similar tocurrent politics in the United States) and the Jewish integrationin the German apparatus (becoming teachers, lawyers, doctors, etc.)was to blame for this recession of values as opposed to modernityas a process. 2) Nationalism: Germany was brought together underthe Nationalist conception that all peoples with German culture,history, and language should be united regardless of whichprincipality currently held control. The German self-conceptionalso had an ethnic component, holding that the perfect German wasblond and blue eyed. Regardless of the fact that the majority ofGermans were dark haired, Jews stuck out like a sore thumb becausethey overwhelmingly had darker hair. In addition, the idea of aGerman Jew was still rather new and both Jews and non-Jews tendedto see the Jews in Germany as being part of a vast Jewish networkand that these Jews just happened to be in Germany. Hitler and theNazis capitalized on this cosmopolitan sensibility by claiming thatJews' allegiances were not to the German State, but to secretJewish Councils organizing world events. 3) Economy: Whether it was true or not, there wasperception among Germans and Hitler and the Nazis, in particular,that Jews were wealthy individuals and had a higher per-capitaincome than the Germans. In many ways (because of the above tworeasons) Germans felt that the Jews were "stealing" their moneywhile they were poor and suffering. 4) Pseudo-Science: The late 19th and early 20thcentury was filled with radical new ideas concerning SocialDarwinism. It was believed by the Pseudo-Scientific community(which was rather in vogue) that different groups of people orraces exhibited different emotional traits that were linked tophysical differences. This led to the belief that Jews were corruptand thieving by their irreversible nature and that they could notbe "cured" and brought up as proper Europeans. This formalizedRacial Anti-Semitism in Germany and made the situation much moredire for German Jews. 5) Heresy: Although not as much an issue in WorldWar II as it may have been 500 years prior, Jews were stillconsidered the heretics who murdered the LORD and Savior. Thishelped to justify Anti-Semitism as the Jewish comeuppance for theiraccepting of the Christ Bloodguilt. 6) Hatred: (written by someone else) Because pplhated them . . . . .not such a good reason, right? Its so sad . . .. . . Why was killing the Jews necessary? The answer to the second part, while cold, is brutally honest.Hitler and the Nazis encouraged the German population to believethat this myriad of Anti-Semitic issues was ingrained in GermanSociety by making it part of the national curriculum and teachingit to millions of German children. Hitler and the Nazis proposedthat the only way to improve Germany was to remove the Jewsentirely. There were two options for such a removal: exile orgenocide. Since no country was willing to take the Jewishpopulation en masse (and this includes the United States and UnitedKingdom due to prevailing stereotypes there) the Nazis made theexecutive decision to commit genocide to "save Germany".

How many black Jews did Adolf Hitler kill?

None. There were no Black Jewish communities in Europe for Hitlerto have killed. However, if Nazis had encountered Black Jews, theywould certainly have been deported and murdered just like everyother Jewish community that Hitler took apart.

Why did Adolf hitler kill the european jews?

Concerning European Jews: Hitler did not just killEuropean Jews. During the Occupation of Tunisia, he also begankilling Tunisian Jews. He would have tried to kill Moroccan Jews aswell, but King Mohammed V resisted. However, he was only able tokill those Jews who lived in countries that Nazi Germany was ableto conquer, which were mostly in Europe. Concerning Jew-Killing: As for why Hitler killedJews at all, please see the Related Question below.

Why did Adolf Hitler promise to kill the jews?

well, he promissed that if the Jews started another war, then it would lead to the destruction of the Jewish people. Which is implicitly saying that he will kill the Jews, there were many reasons given for wanting to kill the Jews. But the truth is often much more simple, attached is a long list giving reasons as to why the Nazis (and Hitler) hated/wanted to kill the Jews, but most of them are irrelevent: antisemitsm started before the Nazis and continued after the Nazis, if there was a global Jewish conspiracy, then they would have done something to help the Jews of Europe. Hitler knew that the Jews were defenceless and harmless, they were killed for political reasons, they were killed because that is what made the people happy and kept the Nazis in power.

Which tyrant in history was worse Adolf Hitler or Joseph Stalin?

It depends on your own opinion,really.They were both brutal murdering tyrants who slaughtered their own people and their political enemies.They both also Killed several million people.Stalin also imprisoned people in brutal soviet labor camps(like Vorkuta or Magadan) who opposed "Stalinism".He also imprisoned German POW`s from WW2,as the Germans did to Russian prisoners at concentration camps during WW2.So i sai they were both horrible,evil people. No you are wrong adolf hitler was 10 times worse, i say he was worse than osama bin laden. he was like a devil. josep stalin ended up helping the allies retard. get you facts right.

Did adolf Hitler kill people besides Jews?

Yes. Many people. Any people who displeased him. Then at the consentration camps there weren't only Jews, and at consentration camps they gassed people.

Why did Adolf Hitler take these actions to kill the Jews?

Many of the 'theories' about Hitler's hatred of the Jews, especially those claiming to be based on a single experience early in his life, are no more than fanciful guesswork. . The reasons given by Hitler in 'Mein Kampf' should be treated with caution. The book is not a reliable source. . In the last 30 years or so historians have generally distinguished between the ordinary prejudices of his background and time (Roman Catholic, Upper Austria, lower middle class, around 1880-1910) and the obsessive hatred that later became one of his hallmarks. . It appears that, contrary to what he says in 'Mein Kampf', Hitler's extreme antisemitism only arose towards the end of World War 1 or even later. (See Volume 1 of Ian Kershaw's two volume biography, Hubris, Penguin Books 1998). . There had been anti-Jewish prejudice of varying degrees of intensity in many parts of Europe and elsewhere for a long time. A distinctive feature of Hitler's antisemitism was that it was formulated as conspiracy theory . For many, especially in Bavaria, this went hand in hand with the 'stab-in-the-back' theory, that is, with the view that Germany had not been defeated on the battlefield but had been brought down by liberal, socialist and Communist subversives on the home front. In other words it was claimed that 'the Jews had caused Germany's defeat in World War 1'. Potentially, this made antisemitism explosive in Germany. . In much of Europe it was assumed that Jews were Communists. In many hardline right wing circles there was talk about a supposed 'Judeo-Bolshevist conspiracy' . This was highly inflammatory. Despite his ranting against Jewish businessmen Hitler saw the Jews as the 'biological root' of Bolshevism. (See the link below on the influence of emigres from Russia). . In Bavaria but not in other most parts of Germany a number of Marxists of Jewish origin had been prominent in the upheavals of 1918-1919. Most, like Ernst Toller and Erich Mühsam, for example, were idealistic utopians. They were not conspirators or traitors or anything of that sort. However, their origins were shamelessly exploited for propaganda purposes. . Many extreme German Nationalists (not only the Nazis) called the new German republic a 'Jewish republic' (though almost none of its leaders were Jews). There was a widespread tendency, not only in Germany, to equate the Jews with subversion and Communism. In many of his speeches Hitler often used the words Jews and Bolshevists almost interchangeably. He merged rabid anti-communism with equally fanatical antisemitism. To this he later added the claim that Jews were homosexuals, allegedly undermining the manliness and and fighting spirit of the German people. This combination was potentially a 'witches' brew'. Against this background there are also many contributing factors and possible theories. Here is some further input: . Jealousy. Some Jews were successful and held "visible" positions in Austria and Germany in the 1920s and 1930s. In the Great Depression. Germany was hit the hardest by the worldwide economic depression, and successful Jews were envied. . Some Germans believed that "Jewish bankers" were responsible for the Treaty of Versailles. . Jews became a scapegoat for Germany's economic problems. (According to this racist sentiment, "international Jewish financiers had plunged the world into a war and the Depression for their business profit.") . Hitler and many Nazis were influenced by the notorious anti-Semitic book called "Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion." . Hitler lived in Vienna from 1907 to 1913 and those were the most difficult years of his life. Hitler was trying to become an artist or to make himself a name in field of arts. He was twice rejected from the Vienna Academy of Fine Art. He claimed that the professors that rejected him were Jewish ... [However, none of the members of the selection panel was Jewish]. . The Nazis had a vision of an Aryan German race that specifically excluded Jews and many other groups of people. . Here is an example of Hitler's anti-Semitic racism from a speech given in Munich in July 1922: "His is no master people; he is an exploiter: the Jews are a people of robbers. He has never founded any civilization, though he has destroyed civilizations by the hundred...everything he has stolen. Foreign people, foreign workmen build him his temples, it is foreigners who create and work for him, it is foreigners who shed their blood for him." . Some say Hitler and the Nazis were opportunistic demagogues. Inciting hatred of the Jews was the means to an end. The Nazis used hatred of the Jews to unify the German people and create a new German empire. Nothing unites a people more than when they believe they are constantly under attack and fighting a common enemy. The Jews were convenient enemies. Christianity had traditionally blamed the death of Christ on the Jews. One can see in the Bible the statement that the Jews demanded the death of Jesus, and said, "let it be upon our heads and that of our children." This became an excuse to abuse the Jews for more than a thousand years. It was not until the 1960s that the Catholic Church stated that the Jews were NOT to blame for the death of Jesus. Antisemitism was deeply embedded in European and American culture. . In the 1930s there was a lot of anti-Jewish feeling and resentment in the Western world. Many Jews who tried to escape the persecution in Germany were refused entry into the US and other European countries and also many countries further afield. . Antisemitism has been rife throughout European history, largely because the Jews were a distinct, identifiable group, who did not integrate. (Those who really wanted to integrate converted.) Of course, many now see pluralism as a virtue, and a variety of ethnicities and religions as a positive thing. However, in the inter war period diversity was often regarded as divisive and "disloyal". . Another key element of a dictatorship is fear, and a visible scapegoat experiencing the wrath of the state is a good way to keep people from stepping out of line. . Hitler stated: "The war is to be a war of annihilation". His henchman Heinrich Himmler declared: "All Poles will disappear from the world. . . . It is essential that the great German people should consider it as a major task to destroy all Poles." . The Jews did absolutely nothing to deserve the treatment they got. Like the Africans and the Indians the Jews were just picked for hatred and unjust things but again they did absolutely nothing! . Since the 1870s the Jews had been the object of a new wave of demonization and conspiracy theories. On the whole this wasn't taken too seriously in Germany, but in Austria anti-Jewish conspiracy theories were spread by extreme right-wing politicians and also by the Roman Catholic Church, which knew perfectly well that these theories were rubbish. Young Adolf was a server (altar-boy) and may have been influenced by this. . Well, there were more "sub-humans", as Hitler called those poor people, than he could handle. He had to find ways to kill them without making it too obvious. That's when the real Holocaust started [1941]! He built extermination camps, where he could kill many thousands of people at a time. . Hitler blamed Germany's defeat in WWI on the Jews, and he hated them. When he took power he started rounding them up. He did the same when he started taking over other countries. He used the Jews, Poles, gays, gypsies, Russians and mentally challenged people as slave labor and then started to annihilate them in gas chambers. His reason - hatred. He classed the above mentioned people as sub human and basically in his Nazi world there was no place for the "sub human", only the 'Aryans'. . To understand the Holocaust you have to understand the Darwinian biology of the time. There was a growing sense, particularly since Ernst Haeckel, that there were those in society who were 'biologically' inferior and that for a 'fit' world to survive and thrive, those who were 'unfit' should be done away with. Instead of letting nature take its course, there was a unspoken sense that humans could take matters into their own hands. I am obviously not supporting this twisted logic, but that is a key to understanding how a number of things converged to create the nightmare of the century. [However, 'biological inferiority' is subjective. In Britain, for example, many Social Darwinists, especially those active in education, were most impressed by the achievements of Jews in schools and universities and concluded that they were a 'superior breed' ... This view was to some extent echoed in Nazi conspiracy theories, which painted a picture of diabolically cunning Jews]. . Hitler blamed the Jews for Germany's defeat in World War I . . Not only did Hitler thank the Jewish doctor who treated his mother, apparently he allowed the doctor to escape Nazi Germany without repercussions. (Doesn't sound like he was too angry at the man). . He didn't only kill Jews. He killed Communists, liberals, homosexuals, gypsies and many other groups, including millions of victims of warfare. Why he did is up for debate, but I'd guess a mixture of antisemitism and stereotypes of the as Jews as Communists, subsersives and all kinds of other things - as a means to an end. A common way to gain power is to spread fear and panic about an enemy (real or imaginary), stir up hatred and present yourself as the only person able to 'save' the country. Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_did_Hitler_and_the_Nazis_hate_the_Jews#ixzz1IjhMwXg9

What did Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin establish?

They established a non-aggresion pact, meaning the USSR and Germany would not attack each other.

How many Jews were killed under Stalin?

This is very hard to even estimate. Numbers indicate it was probably over 1 Million though, possibly much higher (or, also possible, barely above at all).

What did the Jews do to Adolf Hitler to make him hate them and kill them?

Answer 1 Nothing. The ethnic resentment of many Germans toward the Jewsenabled Hitler to make them a "straw man" enemy that he coulddenounce. His vision of an Aryan master race excluded what hecharacterized as inferior races, including Jews and Romani(gypsies). Adolf Hitler and many people around the world at the time had an unfounded belief that the Jews were an evil groupthat controlled the financial wealth of the world. This led to theprejudice called Antisemitism. The real point is that the Jews atthe time were an identifiable race as they wore clothing andbehaved in a way that identified them as a religious group. Theimage and unreasoning racism that went with it is still aroundtoday, just not as common. Hitler hated the Jews and used this and the racism that was rampantat the time for his own ends. What he accomplished was a focusingof energy and hatred into a single goal, the persecution of theJews, to solidify his position as chancellor and ultimate dictatorof Nazi Germany. This power led to the Holocaust and to World WarII. Answer 2 Problem of Non-Culpability Nothing forced Hitler to hate the Jews; he chose to do so. Hitlerwas very aware and cognizant of everything he said and everythinghe did. He was an incredible orator, able to motivate tens ofthousands of people with his passionate beliefs about the greatnessof the German people. He was well aware of how effective he was ingalvanizing support for his atrocities and planned elaboratesystems for maintaining the bureaucracy that drove it. He alsospent a lot of time and effort in developing the ideology thatwould drive this hatred. Hitler was not a machine, but a man and avery passionate one who freely chose to commit one of the greatestatrocities in history. Additionally, the phrasing of this question would offend numerouspeople because it assumes that the Jews were guilty of committingsome sort of offense and were therefore rightfully castigated.While it is not true to say that Jews were innocent lambs, the Jewsdid not do half of the negative nonsense that is attributed to themin order to "justify" Anti-Semitism and violence against them. Jewshave been punished for being different, unique, and misunderstoodand never did anything worth punishing them for in the same waythat Africans never did anything to merit enslavement. Theseactions were taken on account of bigotry and self-supremacy, notbased on any system of equitable justice. Not Just Killing Jews received every type of maltreatment possible over the courseof time. They have been enslaved*, tortured*, evicted*, overtaxed,denied the right to movement*, had their religion suppressed*, hadtheir families ripped from them*, were attacked in their ownhomes*, were summarily executed*, were executed by genocide*,denied the right to self-protection*, restricted in their choice ofoccupation, denied voting or land acquisition rights*, forced tostand trials and kangaroo courts specifically because of theirfaith, and they have been forcibly converted. That list is notexhaustive, but should hit the main points. While Nazis did not do all of these, they did the majority of them.The ones that the Nazis did have received asterisks in the previousparagraph. Issues Asserted by Nazis The Nazis' primary issues with Jews were the unfounded anderroneous assertions of which the following is a general list: 1) Decay of the German State: During the 1800s,Jews and other minorities began to become more integrated in GermanNational Life. They served in its government, its militarydivisions, and its industry. As was typical of Western Europe, theJews had more of a hand in the higher echelons of government thantheir population percentage would account for. Hitler saw thisincreasing Jewish percentage in the government as a slow takeoverof German policy and a corruption of the German people. Theycontrasted the great victories under Bismarck with the depressingfailure of World War I and noted how a much larger percentage ofsoldiers in the latter war were Jewish. There was also thesentiment than in the early 20th century, values were beginning toebb (this is similar to current politics in the United States) andthe Jewish integration in the German apparatus (becoming teachers,lawyers, doctors, etc.) was to blame for this recession of valuesas opposed to modernity as a process. 2) Nationalism: Germany was brought together underthe Nationalist conception that all peoples with German culture,history, and language should be united regardless of whichprincipality currently held control. The German self-conceptionalso had an ethnic component, holding that the perfect German wasblond and blue eyed. Regardless of the fact that the majority ofGermans were dark haired, Jews and Gypsies stuck out like sorethumbs because they overwhelmingly had darker hair. In addition,the idea of a German Jew was still rather new and both Jews andnon-Jews tended to see the Jews in Germany as being part of a vastJewish network and that these Jews just happened to be in Germany.The same perception existed for Gypsies, Jehovah's Witnesses, andCommunists. Hitler capitalized on this cosmopolitan sensibility byclaiming that these people's allegiances were not to the GermanState, but to secret councils made up of these minorities thatconspired against the German people. 3) Economy: Whether it was true or not, there wasperception among Germans and Hitler in particular that Jews werewealthy individuals and had a higher per-capita income than theGermans. In many ways (because of the above two reasons) Germansfelt that the Jews were "stealing" their money while they were poorand suffering. 4) Pseudo-Science: The late 19th and early 20thcentury was filled with radical new ideas concerning SocialDarwinism, a movement that Hitler was a part of. It was believed bythe Pseudo-Scientific community (which was rather in vogue) thatdifferent groups of people or races exhibited different emotionaltraits that were linked to physical differences. This led to thebelief that Jews and Gypsies were corrupt and thieving by theirirreversible nature and that they could not be "cured" and broughtup as proper Europeans. This formalized Racism in Germany and madethe situation much more dire for German minorities. 5) Heresy: Although not as much an issue in WorldWar II as it may have been 500 years prior, Jews were stillconsidered the heretics who murdered the LORD and Savior. Thishelped to justify Anti-Semitism as the Jewish comeuppance for theiraccepting of the Christ Bloodguilt.

How was Joseph Stalin a different leader then Adolf Hitler?

he didn't kill people that were useful like Hitler kill everyone that was not useful to him like babies,elder,women

Were Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler both communists?

\n. \n. No - though they were very similar. \n. \n. Stalin was a Communist. \n. \n. Hitler was a so-called National Socialist ('Nazi'), and strongly anti-communist.

What is reason why adolf hitler kill all jews?

He did not kill all of the Jews, he did not even want to kill allof the Jews. He wanted to kill all of the Jews within his lands because he sawthem as parasitic and morally corrupt and as such a danger to hissociety.

Did adolf Hitler have a house when he was killing Jews?

He had private dwellings within houses that were attached to his office. Much like the President has the White House.

What does Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler have in common?

Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler were both dictators and mass murderers who played a central role in WW II; they were probably the two most feared and most destructive men of the 20th century, if not of all human history.