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What is the Greek god Hades' symbol?

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ive found that the sceptra and the cornucopia are symbols for him which is odd cuz the cornucopia is like a thanks giving thing His symbols were a helmet made of dogskin (called the Helmet of Darkness, that made the wearer invisible), and his 3 headed doggy Cerberus. In Roman times He is also associated with money and silver and being rich.
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Hades Greek God Symbol?

In Greek mythology, Hades is the ruler of the Underworld. His  symbols include the cypress, the scepter, and Cerberus the  three-headed dog.

What are the symbols of the Greek god Hades?

Well there are many symbols for the Lord of the Dead, the main one would have to be his Helm of Darkness made by the Cyclops. It's power is as great as or greater then Poseido

Goals of Hades the Greek God?

He wanted to get revenge on the Titans who came before the Greek gods. He was Zeus and Poseidon brother but he was jealous that he was not the king of the gods and sky

What is the greek god Hades' generation?

Gaia (Earth) alone bore Ouranus (Sky) and from their union was Cronus and Rhea who then had Hades, the usual thought is that Hades had no children, but the Furies are said to

What journeys did the Greek god Hades have?

Hades does not venture very often from the Underworld where he rules, he had kidnapped Persephone as his wife but was not often interested in the affairs of mortals or events

What are the powers of the greek god hades?

The powers of Hades are as follows: he rules over the dead with absolute power, he has control of the furies, he has a helmet that can make him invisible, he can get the god o

What is an allusion about the Greek God Hades?

M. H. Abrams defined allusion as "a brief reference, explicit or indirect, to a person, place or event, or to another literary work or passage"; it is left to the reader to de