You adopted a child 2 years ago you are now divorced and want to sign over your rights how do you do this and will you still have to pay child support if the child is not biologically mine?

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England and Wales It is not possible to "sign over rights". If you have adopted a child, you have a duty to maintain until that child has left non-advanced education or reached 19 years old, whichever comes first. All of which would have been explained to you when you adopted him/her.
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If the mother of your child will not let you see your son and wants you to sign over your rights do you still have to pay child support?

You will still have to pay back if any owed. After you sign you won't have to pay anymore because all your legal rights to the child will be terminiated. If Mom agrees to let you voluntarily terminate your parental rights, then, no, you won't have to pay child support going forward (but will still have to pay any arrearage unless Mom agrees to forgive it). But DO NOT do this if it not what you want to do. If you want to be a father, fight for it. Get court ordered visitation, then if Mom refuses to allow you to see your child, she can be held in contempt of court.

If you sign over your parental rights to a child do you still have to pay child support?

That would be the decision of the judge and the laws in your jurisdiction. In most cases signing over physical parental rights does not relieve the parent of their financial obligation unless the other parent agrees. If however, the rights are being relinquished so the child can be adopted, the court will dismiss child support obligations. You need to consult with an attorney or legal advocate in your jurisdiction. Note that you cannot simply give up parental rights in order to avoid child support. Generally there must be another adult who is willing to take over your legal responsibilities and financial obligations as the child's parent. In general, parental rights are terminated either preparatory to an adoption, or after a trial in which it is determined that the parent is unfit. In any case, termination of parental rights does not, in itself, terminate child support. Courts are concerned with the child's welfare and nothing else. The best interest of the child will be the main concern of the court.

If you sign over your parental rights do you still have to pay child support?

Answer . \nThat would be the decision of the judge/court of jurisdiction. In most cases signing over physical parental rights does not relieve the parent of their financial obligation unless the other parent agrees. If however, the rights are being relinquished so the child can be adopted, the court will dismiss child support obligations.

In the state of Texas if a father signs over his rights does he still pay child support?

Answer . No he doesn't. If you stop paying child support, you're not allowed to see the child, but you get backed up a lot of bills, so if you sign over the rights and don't see the child, you don't have to pay child support. Also, if you receive full custody of one child, and another child lives with your ex, you terminate child support, & you still get to see your other child. So unless it's changed, or is different from county to county, or if I've witnessed special cases, that should be how it is.. Answer . If Mom agrees to let Dad voluntarily terminate his parental rights, then, no, he won't have to pay child support going forward (but will still have to pay any arrearage unless Mom agrees to forgive it). However, Dad can’t just decide on his own to sign over his rights and discontinue child support.

If you sign over your rights as a father in the state of Texas do you still have to pay child support?

Answer . \nYes, giving up parental rights does not release the parent from financial obligation to the child or children; until they reach the age of emancipation\nor the age stipulated in the child support order.. Answer . \nTexas allows the father to discontinue child support if he terminates rights. It happened to me.. Answer . If Mom agrees to let Dad voluntarily terminate his parental rights, then, no, he won't have to pay child support going forward (but will still have to pay any arrearage unless Mom agrees to forgive it). However, Dad can’t just decide on his own to sign over his rights and discontinue child support.

Do you still have to pay child support if you are the father and live in Minnesota and want to sign all your rights over?

This doesn't answer your question, but I thought you might find this website intersting: http://www.divorcenet.com/states/minnesota/mn_art23 Please note: "...the Minnesota Courts of Appeals have consistently ruled that a voluntary termination of parental rights for reasons other than to facilitate adoption works a substantial detrimental effect on a child, who will be forced to look solely to his custodial parent to meet all of his needs. The effect is that District Court Judges are extremely reluctant to terminate parent's rights voluntarily and certainly not where the termination is not agreed upon by the custodial parent."

If the father of a 2-year-old little girl signs over his rights to the mother does he still have to pay child support?

Answer . Relinquishment of custodial rights and voluntary termination of parental rights are different issues. A parent who wishes to be relieved of the legal and financial responsibility of a child must file a petition in the circuit court in the county of residence requesting parental rights be terminated. Usually a parent will only be released from parental obligation in order to allow the child(ren) to be eligible for adoption. In rare cases a biological parent will be allowed to voluntarily give up rights to their child and be released from all financial responsibility. Such decisions depend upon the laws of the state and at the discretion of the presiding judge.

If you signed over your parental rights do you have to still pay child support?

\n Answer \n. \n. \nIt depends on what state you live in. In most states you still will have to pay support, unless you and the other parent make it part of the agreement, ie: "I will sign away my rights, if you don't intend to seek child support payments".\n. \n . \n Whether or not a TPR petition is accepted and if so what terms it is accepted under is entirely up to the descretion of the presiding judge.\n. \nEven though the custodial parent agrees to having child support terminated, the court has to make the final ruling, it is not an act that can be done arbitrarily.

How can you protect your child from their biological father if he signed away his rights years ago but now will not leave the child alone?

\n. \n Answer \n. \n. \nTo the best of my knowledge, since I am not a lawyer, once you give up rights as a parent or legal guardian, you have no rights toward the child. You need to get a restraining order against him. This will make him not be allowed to call your residence or allow him to come within one-hundred feet of you or your child, and if he does he will go to jail. Call the cops if he comes around.

In Indiana if you sign over your parental rights do you still have to pay child support?

Under Indiana law, IC 31-35-1-12 (2)(a) once parental rights are terminated, all obligations of support are terminated at that time as well. You will ONLY have your rights terminated, however, where a court determinest that it is in the best interests of the child. You will however be required to pay the child support that was ordered before the termination. It only stops after parental rights are terminated, but does not mean you do not owe the back support.

If a father signs his rights away and allows another man to adopt his child does the biological father still have to pay the back child support?

That depends, on a couple of things. First is any money owed to the state, if you received state assistance the state will require to be paid back some of the funds. Second, if there is no court order in effect that states the back support could be nulled then he still owes. This answer above is correct, but to make it a little more understandable I wanted to add that my husband just legally adopted my daughter from my first marriage. My ex had not contacted her for more than 6 months and had nothing to do with her, so he couldn't contest the adoption. He is no longer liable for current child support, but still owes all the back child support. They will still collect his tax returns or any other moneys he is due like paycheck with holding.

If the biological father just got the order to pay for the child support and now the custodial perant's spouse wants to adopt the 2 year old till what moment does the father has to pay child support?

I want to stop paying child support . In most jurisdictions world-wide, adoption terminates the responsibility of the biological parent(s) to pay support. This is effective from the start of the adoption. Technically, it is effective at the instant the court order for the adoption is signed. While the adoption process is underway, but not finalized, the biological parent(s) is still obliged to maintain the child.

If father signs over his rights to the mothers husband will he still have to pay child support?

There must be a court order terminating parental rights. A person cannot sign over their rights to another -- the law does not recognize such a procedure. Until the court issues an order, the father has retained their parental rights, and child support payments will need to continue according to the court order. If parental rights are terminated, there are no child support payments required

If you sign over your rights to a child in California will you still have to pay child support and insurance for the child?

California family law doesn't permit you to "sign away" financial obligation to a child, even if you have given the other parent physical and legal custody. Assuming you are trying to cut your costs by not paying the other parent, I strongly suggest you hire a competent Family Law attorney. . Child Support in California is generally based on quality of life at both parents' house, divided equally. The intent of the law is to maintain a fair quality of life for the child, no matter where or who they live with. Financial "fairness" to the parents is not considered, unless one or both are unable to earn a fair wage. Also, quitting your job doesn't equate to reduced expenses, because the other parent or the court can determine your ability to earn a wage and has the ability to "impute" an income on your behalf, making you potentially owe more than you can make. . Best of luck.

If a mother signs over her rights to her children does she still have to pay child support?

Perhaps, even if the court grants a Termination of Parental Rights petition it does not mean the requesting parent will be relieved of his or her financial obligation, that decision is made by the judge.. A TPR is not a venue to allow a parent to escape their financial obligation to a minor child, if that is the sole purpose of the petition it will not be granted. Generally a TPR is only granted to allow a minor child to be eligible for legal adoption by a new spouse or party.

If a child is adopted by stepfather does biological father still pay child support?

The biological father may only stop paying child support under oneof the following four circumstances: Death of the child; the childturns 18 and decides not to pursue higher education; the childquits or graduates higher education; or the biological father isfound not to be the "true" father. So, if a stepfather adopts them,more than likely, the biological will still be responsible forchild support.

If you sign over your parental rights to a child do you still have to pay child support in tn?

Generally speaking, once parental rights (which is a different thing than custodial rights) are terminated a person is no longer responsible for child support. However, you cannot just "sign over" your parental rights. Parental rights can only be terminated by a judge, and unless it's a case of adoption (where someone else is willing to assume your parental responsibilities), the judge generally says "no, I won't allow it"

If you sign over your rights as a father in the state of Minnesota do you still have to pay child support?

Actually, that person is wrong. If you sign over your parental rights, you are giving up any and all reposibilities for this child to their mother. It is that same as if you were going to give the child up for adoption, you wouldn't pay the adoptive parents for taking it would you? No. You basically are adopting the child onto the mother and so you have no more rights to say how the child is raised and whatnot, and would no longer have to pay child support seeing how legally, the child is no longer yours at all. All physical and financial reposibilities would be gone. But the mother does have to agree to this and also sign the paperwork saying she wants this, and also, if you have any back child support you have not paid you will still have to pay it unless the mother signs the paperwork saying she will "forgive" that and doesn't care to get it.

If a man wants to sign over his rights can he in Kentucky without paying child support?

First, it should be understood that until court ordered, single fathers have no parental rights. Financial responsibility and parental rights are not linked until he has applied to the court for permission to see his child(ren). What the father is doing is motioning the court to be released from current and future financial obligations, along giving up the right to "petition" the court for parental rights. see related links

In North Carolina can a biological father sign over all rights to a child and still be required to pay child support?

GIVING UP PARENTAL RIGHTS First, it should be understood that until court ordered, single fathers have NO ASSUMED PARENTAL RIGHTS. Financial responsibility and parental rights are not linked until he has applied to the court for permission to see his child(ren). What the father is doing is motioning the court to be released from current and future financial obligations, along with giving up the right to "PETITION" the court for Parental Rights. This said, since they are the ones who actually carry the child to term and give birth to it, ONLY MOTHERS have the universal right to voluntarily give their parental rights AND financial responsibilities for her child(ren). The Safe Haven Laws were enacted to help prevent prom night dumpster babies. Rather than throw the child in the trash or drown it in the toilet, she can give up her child, giving up all rights and responsibilities for said child (NO QUESTIONS ASKED) at any Hospital ER. Women and girls who give up their babies under the Safe Haven Laws almost invariably do so because neither her family nor the baby's father want the child and will not help her care for it. While the father can run off, never to be seen again, the woman cannot do the same since the child is growing inside her body. That is why Safe Haven Laws exist for women, but similar laws do not exist for men. It is practically unheard of for a mother to give up her child under Safe Haven when the father is present and willing to care for the child. So, the male must seek the permission of the Court, AND the Mother, to give up his own financial responsibility. Petitioning the courts to be absolved of financial responsibility can be time consuming, and expensive in terms of legal fees and court costs. Further, he could be obligated to pay for the mother's legal counsel. Further, if the mother is receiving Aid For Dependent Children (AFDC) or other State Aid for the children, not even the court has the authority to grant a motion to absolve the father of responsibility. If the issue involves dealing with a "Gatekeeper Mother", there are means and methods to deal with this. The father need only learn what they are. See links.

Do you still pay child support if you sign yo rights over?

In most states and in most cases, yes. Voluntarily signing over rights does not end child support obligations unless the child is being adopted by another person who is, by virtue of adoption, assuming financial responsibility for the child.