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12 Words to Permanently Erase from Your Vocabulary

Literally

Literally

"Literally" is both incredibly overused and rampantly misunderstood, largely due to Rob Lowe's character on "Parks and Recreation." You should only use it to describe something that actually happened. You shouldn't say, "I literally just died laughing." Unless you've somehow managed to say this beyond the grave, then this statement isn't accurate. Regardless, you should forget it ever existed.

Just

Just

The word "just" describes something that recently happened. People have various ideas of how long "recently" is. This causes miscommunications. More accurate and precise time statements, such as "10 minutes ago," avoid the miscommunications of "just" statements.

Irregardless

Irregardless

Saying "irregardless" doesn't make you sound smart. It's not even a word. Just stick with regardless -- it's what you mean to say anyway.

Should

Should

"Should" creates a vicious cycle of obligation and regret. People use "should" to reflect on regrets or declare an obligation. Reflecting on "should" scenarios wastes time and increases depression. Completing tasks out of obligation rather than actual want causes regret in the future.

This

This

Using simply "This," along with a photo that demonstrates your point, is an incredibly lazy way to make a statement. Relying on gifs only shows your ability to copy and paste, rather than make a well-reasoned argument.

Never

Never

People often find themselves declaring "never" statements about an uncontrollable future. They go out of their ways to avoid doing a task. However, they ultimately accept defeat and discontinue avoiding the task. The time and energy spent avoiding the task is a waste of resources.

But

But

The word "but" encourages pessimistic thoughts and actions to flourish. People use the word to introduce objections, contrasting statements, and exceptions. Uses of "but" like "I lost two pounds, but I still look fat" discourage positivity and focuses on the negative.

Actually

Actually

The word "actually" is unnecessary and leads to miscommunications. The word "actually" often emphasizes surprise. People misinterpret "actually" phrases as condescending when they come before a positive statement, such as "he actually passed his test." The character Oscar from the show "The Office" gained a reputation as a snob for his constant use of "actually" phrases.

Maybe

Maybe

Responding "Maybe" when you should be making a decision only tells others that you are indecisive and show uncertainty when deciding on a course of action. Although this is a hard word to let go of, try to decrease its use and instead use "I will" or "I will not." This will show confidence and help reduce indecisiveness.

Always

Always

Words like "always" allow people to keep a closed mind when it comes to the idea of change. A person lacks the ability to control that something will "always" happen. This fact makes words like "always" incorrect and useless. Basing actions on "always" statements leads to inefficiently managing resources, such as time or money.

Really

Really

The word "really" makes you sound like you're trying to emphasize the validity or effectiveness of something. Using this word over and over again can create a sense of mistrust from the people you're talking to!

Uh, um, ah, etc.Getty Images

Uh, um, ah, etc.

These kind of words always diminish the impact of what you're trying to say. You should especially eliminate them from your important speeches and presentations. If you don't, that's all people will hear as you're speaking. They may even start keeping track of how many "um's" you're dropping.

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