Electronics Engineering

Active region in transistor?

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2012-06-01 21:59:01
2012-06-01 21:59:01

The active region of a transistor is when the transistor has sufficient base current to turn the transistor on and for a larger current to flow from emitter to collector. This is the region where the transistor is on and fully operating.

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Active region = Where transistor is waiting to amplify the signal . Saturation region = Where the transistor is unable to amplify even though it is fully switched On.


a transistor in active region when emitter junction is forward biased nd collector junction is reverse biased


a transistor can only work in active region cox in active region collector base junction is in reverse bias and emitter base junction is in forward bias.


For a transistor to be in active region : Base Emitter junction should be forward biased and Emitter collector junction should be reverse biased.


linear in active region....


we will operate transistor mainly in 4 regions..namely active ,cutoff,saturation and pinch off region depending on the type of biasing. if it is under active region then transistor is a linear device.. linearity in the sense if the output is proportional to input then it is said to be linear.


yes transistor is an active element.


a transistor that is not active


A bipolar junction transistor (BJT) can act in three different regions. They areCut off regionActive regionSaturation region


Transistor=Transfer+Resistor. When Transistor operates in active region its input resistance is high and output resistance is low. So,We can consider transistor as a device which transfers its resistance from high to low. And by this property transistor amplifies input signal.


Transistor is an active element because it can amplify the signal applied.


it is called as quiscient point. it is used to fix the transistor in the required region. it is plotted in the dc load line of transfer characteristics of a transistor. if the q point is in the middle of the load line the transistor amplifies the input signal since it is in active region and if the q point is in the bottom of the load line the transistor becomes off and it is said to be in cut-off region and if the q point is placed at the top of the load line the transistor is said to be in saturation region and more current flows through it.




operating region of the transistor is the area of the voltage and an electronic configuration in which a transistor can work with its full efficiency. In that operating region transistor can be used easily what above said by harsh is correct...the following may help u further... Based on application the transistor is decided where to lie. for example transistors are made to lie in active region to make it as amplifier. when transistors are used as switch it is made to lie in saturation region(when switch is made as ON) and cut-off region(when switch is made as OFF).....


There are three operating regions in transistor...(Transfer-Resistor)1)cutoff region2)Active region3)Saturation regionActive region:It is the central region where there are curves and where slope is taken.it is the region where emitter-base is forward biased and collector-base is reversed bias.Cutoff region:It is the region which lies below the curves. it is the region where the transistor is in OFF state.in this region both emitter-base and collector-base is reversed bias(i.e no sufficient voltage is applied so that the voltage does not break the DEPLETION region).Saturation region:It is the region situated to near the active region near Y-axis.It is the region in which the both emitter-base and collector-base is forward biased.Based on application the transistor is decided where to lie.for example transistors are made to lie in active region to make it as amplifier.when transistors are used as switch it is made to lie in saturation region(when switch is made as ON) and cut-off region(when switch is made as OFF).....Thanks guys for reading this. please forgive me if there are any mistakes....ANSWER: In actuality there is only one REGION The other regions are not operating regions but rather states. An operating region on a transistor is set up during design of an amplifier to transfer maximum undirstorted power to the load. This design is called BIAS


The cutoff region is when the transistor doesn't have sufficient base current to drive a larger current from emitter to collector. Therefore, the transistor does not turn on and stays shut off.


depletion layer depletion zone juntion region space charge region bipolar transistor field effect transistor variable capacitance diode


The transistor have three regions namely cut off,active,and saturation.When the switch is in saturation region then it is called the transition on or we can say the switch is closed


Emitter, Collector and Base cutoff region, saturation region, and liner region


The collector region of a transistor is made larger than the base and the emitter region because the collector region of the transistor disipates heat..


The breakdown region of a transistor is the region where the supply voltage, Vcc, becomes so large that the collector-emitter junction of the transistor breaks down and conducts, even though there is no base current.


For a transistor to work as an amplifier it must be connected in active region of operation. ie. input (Base-Emitter) must be forward biased and output (Collector-Emitter) must be reverse biased.


it is not a passive device .y because it is used to amplify the voltage and current .so as according to the definition of active device is the device which is used to amplify the current r voltage .hence transistor is a active device.


It depends on the type of the transistor. For a BJT, the transistor must be biased at the center of the linear region, you can know the center by plotting the load line. Be careful for the DC and the AC load lines. For a EMOSFET transistor, it must be biased in the saturation region.



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