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At what temperature is the density of water the greatest?

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2017-08-13 08:56:20
2017-08-13 08:56:20
Density of water

The density of water is greatest at about four degrees C (39.2ยฐ F or 277degrees Kelvin) which is a density of 1.000 kg per liter (62.4 pounds per cubic foot). Liquids expand slightly as their temperature is raised, but liquid water is denser than solid water (ice). That is why ice floats: it is less dense than liquid water. That is due to the crystal structure of ice. When water freezes, its volume increases about nine percent.

277 K.
Density rho = mass m / Volume V.

Water has a density of 1,000 kg/m3 = 1,000 g/L = 1.000 kg/dm3 = 1.000 kg/L = 1.000 g/cm3 = 1.000 g/mL at the temperature of 3.98 degrees Celsius.

Temperature in degrees Celsius

and the density of water:

1 ................. 999,90

2 ................. 999,94

3 ................. 999,96

4 ................. 999,97

5 ................. 999,96

6 ................. 999,94

7 ................. 999,90

The highest density is only at around 4 degreesCelsius.

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Allow me to answer:

FOR PENN FOSTER USERS

it is 277 K

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