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Answered 2009-12-01 17:40:17

Let's see. The atomic mass is the total number of protons and neutrons. The atomic number is the total number of protons. That means that when we subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass we will get the number of neutrons. We can get the equation: Atomic mass - Atomic number = Neutrons. It can be expressed: 11 - 5 = ?. Whoops, I forgot how to do arithmetic.

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5 protons and 5.81 Neutrons. 10.81 is the Atomic Mass Unit and 5 is the Atomic Number of Boron.


It has an atomic number of 5 and hence it has 6 neutrons.


The number of protons in an element is its atomic number. Boron's atomic number is 5 - ergo, there are 5 protons. The number of neutrons in an element is the difference between the atomic mass and the atomic number of an element. boron's atomic mass is 11. Therefore, 11 - 5 = 6. There are 6 neutrons in boron. In conclusion, there are 6 neutrons and 5 protons in boron.


Boron is atomic number 5, so Boron 11 will have 11-5 = 6 neutrons.


Five. The Atomic Number of Boron is 5 so it has five protons and 5 electrons. The Mass number of Boron is 11. Mass minus atomic number = number of neutrons = 6. BORON:Electrons = 5 Protons = 5 Neutrons = 6


Five proton and electrons, 6 neutrons. This because this is the atomic number of boron, which states how many protons and electron in the element. For neutrons you must subtract the atomic number (5 in this case) from the rounded. average atomic mass.


Since Boron's atomic number is 5, it has 5 protons and 5 electrons. The standard boron atom has 6 neutrons in it.


Boron has an atomic number of 4, so that each neutral atom contains 4 electrons and an ion with a charge of -1 would have 5 electrons. There is insufficient information to determine the number of neutrons, because boron has more than one stable isotope. If the atomic mass number is specified, the number of neutrons is the mass number minus the atomic number.


5 Protons, 6 Neutrons. For future reference, the protons is the atomic number (right above the element symbol) To get the neutrons you subtract the atomic mass (underneath the symbol) by the number of protons. You have to round this number.


There is only one atomic number for any element. For boron, it is 5.


All isotopes of the same element will have the same number of protons. Two particles with different numbers of protons will inevitably be different elements. The atomic number of boron is 5, meaning there are 5 protons in all isotopes of boron. The "11" in "Boron-11" is the mass number, which is the sum of the number of protons and neutrons. So if we add the number of protons (5) with the number of neutrons (unknown), we get 11. The unknown number therefore has to be 6, meaning there are 6 neutronsin Boron-11.


Boron has 5 electrons and protons; the number of neutrons is specific for each isotope. Number of neutrons in a boron isotope = Mass number - 5


8 neutrons. It's atomic mass is 9 hence the boron-9 or 9B. It must have 5 protons to be a boron atom (if it had 4 it would be berillium and if it had 6 it would be carbon) an atom always has an equal number of protons and electrons ( unless it's an ion, eg Na+ ). Anyway to find the number of neutrons an isotope has simply subtract the number of protons (the atomic number) from its atomic mass, which in this case is 9. This gives you the number of neutrons present in the nucleus then obviously you just double it.


The number of protons in an atom will always be the same as the atomic number, by which the periodic table is organized. So figuring out how many protons an atom has just becomes an exercise at reading the table. In this case, boron has an atomic number of five. If the particle is specifically an atom, then it will be neutral and the number of electrons will balance the number of protons exactly. The number of neutrons will differ depending on the isotope - atoms of the same element with different numbers of neutrons. Boron has two isotopes, the most commonly found being 11B with six neutrons.


Number of Neutrons = Atomic mass minus Atomic Number. Neutrons = 18[Atomic Mass] - 8[Atomic Number] Neutrons = 10


Number of neutrons = Atomic mass of an isotope - atomic number of the element The atomic number of berkelium is 97.Number of neutrons = Atomic mass of an isotope - atomic number of the element The atomic number of berkelium is 97.


boron-10 the most common isotope of boron, has 5 protons and 5 neutrons. The less common boron-11 has the same number of protons and 6 neutrons.


To find the number of neutrons simply subtract the atomic number from the atomic mass. In this case there are two neutrons.


Atomic Mass - Atomic number = number of neutrons the number of protons bad neutrons make up the atomic mass.


Number of neutrons = Atomic mass of the isotope - Atomic number (for Am is 95)


Number of neutrons = Atomic mass of an isotope - atomic number of the element The atomic number of californium is 98. Number of neutrons = Atomic mass of an isotope - atomic number of the element The atomic number of californium is 98.


Atomic number does not directly relate to # of neutrons, Atomic # is the number of protons in the atom of an element. You need to know the atomic mass of the element too-Not just the atomic # to find out how many neutrons it has. If you know the atomic mass, then you can subtract the element's atomic # from that and voila! you get the # of neutrons. If ur confused: atomic mass - atomic # = # of neutrons ^_^


Number of neutrons = Atomic mass of an isotope - atomic number of the element The atomic number of berkelium is 97.


5- the atomic number of boron is 5. Atomic number is the number of protons and this is the same as the number of electrons in the neutral atom.


Number of neutrons = Atomic mass of an isotope - Atomic number of the element; the atomic number of Lr is 103. Lawrencium has many isotopes and each isotope has a different number of neutrons.