answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2014-10-28 19:35:14
2014-10-28 19:35:14

There may be some variation in different jurisdictions but generally, a child cannot make that decision. The child can express a desire to live with a particular parent but it will be up to the judge to decide if the other parent, presumably the one with physical custody, doesn't consent. A judge is under no obligation to approve of the child's choice. The judge will decide what placement is in thebestinterest of the child.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


Generally, the parent without physical custody but the court will decide.


A child cannot determine their own custody in any state. If the parent's can't work out a custody arrangement the judge will decide in the best interest of the child.


That means they have custody of you and decide over you. Your mother also decide over you and she can end the temporary custody whenever she likes. So you can not decide anything until you are 18yo.


There may be some variation in different jurisdictions but generally, a child cannot make that decision. The child can express a desire to live with a particular parent but it will be up to the judge to decide if the other parent, presumably the one with physical custody, doesn't consent. A judge is under no obligation to approve of the child's choice. The judge will decide what placement is in the best interest of the child.


"One common arrangement is joint legal custody, and one parent to have sole physical custody, while the other has visitation rights. North Carolina family courts decide child custody issues based on what it believes to be in the best interest of the child. "http://statelaws.findlaw.com/north-carolina-law/north-carolina-child-custody-laws.html


No. If the parents cannot come to an agreement the court will decide who shall have primary physical custody.


You have to file at your local Cout House for temporary custody of a child. The court will decide if you get temporary custody or not depending on the circumstances. Temporary custody can be contested in court.


Usually the Court would decide that.


If you live in the US, no, she can't just decide that on her own. Mom either has to agree to it or you have to petition the court for a change of custody.


No, there is still a parent left with custody. And custody can never be willed. That is for the court to decide. The ones in the will can ask for custody but it is up to the court.


That is up to the court to decide.That is up to the court to decide.That is up to the court to decide.That is up to the court to decide.




No, he can't. And the father could be jailed for contempt of court if he allowed it to happen.


Custody labels change depending upon the jurisdiction in which you reside. It is important to know and understand the proper custody labels and have them applied in your child custody order. Generally there are two main categories of custody:Legal Custody: Legal custody refers to making major decisions in your child's life such as medical and health related decisions, education, and welfare.Physical Custody: Physical custody refers to which parent the children reside with on a day to day basis.Sole LegalOne parent has the right to make any decisions that affect the child.Joint LegalBoth parents have the right to be involved in decisions regarding the child.Sole PhysicalThe child resides with one parent who is said to have primary physical custody. The other parent may or may not have visitation rights pursuant to a visitation schedule either issued by the court or arranged by the parents.Joint PhysicalArrangements are designed that provide the child will spend 50% of their time with each parent. Child support is modified based on this time split and the differences between their incomes.Generally the phrase full custody is used to refer to a parent with sole legal custody. Sole legal custody means that the parent has the right to make all decisions that affect the child. That includes such things as where the child resides, attends school, medical treatment, etc. Joint legal custodymeans the parents both have an equal right to make decisions regarding the child and one must consult the other before making important decisions. Primary physical custody refers to the parent with whom the child resides the majority of the time.


Check Link BelowConsidered Factors in deciding to go for a child custody modification?


No. A minor is not allowed to decide, it's the parents or the court.


You will have to show significant change in order to change the custody agreement in North Carolina. Even if there are significant changes, it is up to the judge to decide the custody of a child.


The child can decide whatever it wants. But the parents can have the custody ruling enforced, regardless of what the child wants; to actually change the ruling, they'll have to go back to court and seek a modification. The court may (or may not) take the child's wishes into consideration.


Technically in cases where there is no order of custody possesion is 9/10ths of the law IF both parents are legally recognized to be parents (i.e. have signed the birth certificate). However if one parent has had primary physical custody of the child following a separation and has been responsible for the majority of the care for the child the court may not look kindly on the other parent hijacking custody. The best thing to do is file for temporary custody before actually keeping the child.


You have legal rights from birth. If you mean regarding custody and decide who to live with, you have to be 18 to decide by yourself.


No, you can not choose until you are 18. If your parent wants custody he/she has to go to court and modify the court order. The court will decide if your parent is fit to take care of you.


A father can gain custody by going back to court probably with an attorney. The judge will have to decide that the switch is in the best interest of the child.





Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.