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Can a father who lives in Oklahoma get visitation rights to a 5 and 4 year old if so which state does he have to get the court order?

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2009-10-11 23:08:53
2009-10-11 23:08:53

In the state of the child's residency. see links

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No. Only a court can "revoke" visitation rights.No. Only a court can "revoke" visitation rights.No. Only a court can "revoke" visitation rights.No. Only a court can "revoke" visitation rights.


As long as he has been established as the father and has not been deemed an unfit parent, the court will grant visitation rights.


No. Not if the father has visitation rights. In that case the mother would need court approval. If the father objects the court will hear the objections and issue a ruling.No. Not if the father has visitation rights. In that case the mother would need court approval. If the father objects the court will hear the objections and issue a ruling.No. Not if the father has visitation rights. In that case the mother would need court approval. If the father objects the court will hear the objections and issue a ruling.No. Not if the father has visitation rights. In that case the mother would need court approval. If the father objects the court will hear the objections and issue a ruling.




Only the court can legally suspend visitation rights.


You need to return to court and request a modification of the visitation order.


If you end a relationship with the child's mother you are not losing visitation rights, you never had visitation rights. Visitation rights are granted by a court. If you and the child's mother were married and you had a long term relationship with the child, or if there are half-siblings of that child (your children with whom you do have visitation rights) the court may award visitation rights. You need to consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues and who can review your situation and explain your options.On the other hand, you can get visitation rights by a court order if you had legally adopted the child.


No. Not if a family court has jurisdiction over the child and the father has visitation rights. If the parents were never married and there has been no court involvement or paternity established the mother can try to move. However, the father could file an action in court to establish his paternity, visitation rights and prevent the removal of the child from the state.No. Not if a family court has jurisdiction over the child and the father has visitation rights. If the parents were never married and there has been no court involvement or paternity established the mother can try to move. However, the father could file an action in court to establish his paternity, visitation rights and prevent the removal of the child from the state.No. Not if a family court has jurisdiction over the child and the father has visitation rights. If the parents were never married and there has been no court involvement or paternity established the mother can try to move. However, the father could file an action in court to establish his paternity, visitation rights and prevent the removal of the child from the state.No. Not if a family court has jurisdiction over the child and the father has visitation rights. If the parents were never married and there has been no court involvement or paternity established the mother can try to move. However, the father could file an action in court to establish his paternity, visitation rights and prevent the removal of the child from the state.


If the court issued a visitation schedule then the mother has visitation rights. She has no parental rights if the grandparents were appointed legal guardians.If the court issued a visitation schedule then the mother has visitation rights. She has no parental rights if the grandparents were appointed legal guardians.If the court issued a visitation schedule then the mother has visitation rights. She has no parental rights if the grandparents were appointed legal guardians.If the court issued a visitation schedule then the mother has visitation rights. She has no parental rights if the grandparents were appointed legal guardians.


No. A father can only lose visitation rights if those rights are terminated by the courts. He can be called into court for non-payment, but even this is not typically grounds enough for termination of rights.


No. Child support, visitation and custody are separate issues that must be addressed by court orders. The father must petition the same court for a visitation order. If the parents cannot agree on a schedule one will be set by the court.



You need to take the mother back to court to enforce the visitation order. You should act ASAP. The mother is in contempt of a court order and if she continues to ignore the court she could lose custody.


Visitation rights are set forth in a court order of the family court. You can obtain a copy by visiting the court.Visitation rights are set forth in a court order of the family court. You can obtain a copy by visiting the court.Visitation rights are set forth in a court order of the family court. You can obtain a copy by visiting the court.Visitation rights are set forth in a court order of the family court. You can obtain a copy by visiting the court.


No, court ordered visitation can only be revoked by the judge issuing the order (sometimes by an appeal to a higher court). The mother should insist her legal representative petition for a court order to enforce her visitation rights.


You can file a petition for visitation rights in the court that has jurisdiction over the case.You can file a petition for visitation rights in the court that has jurisdiction over the case.You can file a petition for visitation rights in the court that has jurisdiction over the case.You can file a petition for visitation rights in the court that has jurisdiction over the case.


You do not have the right to deny visitations but if you do, the father can and should request a court hearing to establish his paternity and get visitation rights. He can request custody or joint custody and the court will render a decision. If the child is to remain with the mother the court will set up a child support order and the father can file contempt charges if the mother withholds visitation or violates the visitation order in any other way.You do not have the right to deny visitations but if you do, the father can and should request a court hearing to establish his paternity and get visitation rights. He can request custody or joint custody and the court will render a decision. If the child is to remain with the mother the court will set up a child support order and the father can file contempt charges if the mother withholds visitation or violates the visitation order in any other way.You do not have the right to deny visitations but if you do, the father can and should request a court hearing to establish his paternity and get visitation rights. He can request custody or joint custody and the court will render a decision. If the child is to remain with the mother the court will set up a child support order and the father can file contempt charges if the mother withholds visitation or violates the visitation order in any other way.You do not have the right to deny visitations but if you do, the father can and should request a court hearing to establish his paternity and get visitation rights. He can request custody or joint custody and the court will render a decision. If the child is to remain with the mother the court will set up a child support order and the father can file contempt charges if the mother withholds visitation or violates the visitation order in any other way.


As in a single father? No, not until court ordered. see link


An unmarried father cannot "choose" to not pay child support. The laws in every state require that a father pay for the support of his child. The mother must bring an action to the appropriate court so that a child support order can be established. Visitation rights are separate and a father can have visitation rights established by the court. Visitation rights are not dependent on paying child support.


If you have a court order for visitation the order must be respected and he cannot move the child out of state without yours and the courts permission. If you don't have a court order for visitation, custody or child support and your parental rights have been terminated you don't have any legal rights to the child and he can not be stopped.Another PerspectiveIf the mother has visitation rights then she has parental rights. The father cannot move out of state without a modification of the visitation order if the move will affect the mother's visitation rights. He must seek a modification from the court. It will go easier if she consents.


No. A mother has no such power. Only a court can deny visitation rights of a father. During a marriage both parents have equal rights concerning the child. If she wants to stop visits with the father she must petition the court and provide compelling evidence that it is in the best interest of the children. The court will investigate and review the situation and render a decision.


The biological father does have parental rights but he have to petition the court for visitation rights and custody.


It could be one of many different things. Why don't you ask him? Or...if you mean you're the father of a 16-year-old and have no visitation rights, then why don't you go to court and get them?


Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.



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