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Can a landlord raise the rent 115 dollars in one month?

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2006-09-22 12:02:02
2006-09-22 12:02:02

It's possible, but he would need to give written notice, probably 30 days in advance. It could be that he's been asking a very low rent, that the land values have sharply risen, or he's a greedy person. But it's his perogative. However, if he raises rent on one apartment, he has to raise it on the whole building.

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Under Florida law, a landlord is permitted to raise your rent as long as its stated in your lease. This law does not specify how much the landlord can raise the rent, only that he is permitted to if your lease says he can.

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Your landlord cannot raise the rent within the time periods that a lease is in effect. This means, that if there is a lease in effect for one year, then the landlord may not raise the rent while that lease is in effect.

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Your landlord can do what he wants when your lease runs out.

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Our landlord is going to raise the rent again. I complained to the landlord about the leaky pipes.

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How much and how often can a landlord raise the rent?

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More than likely yes. It all depend on the contract / renter agreement you signed. If the contract reads that the landlord can raise the rent at any given time then yes.If the contract reads the landlord can raise rent at the end of a lease term (for example 6 months.) then also yes.Unless the agreement states the landlord cannot raise rent 1. during a lease period, or 2. at all then he can raise it regardless of your income situation.You may try and talk to your landlord and explain the situation and they might have some compassion for your situation.

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Yes, subject to any local rent control laws.

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I don't believe any state has a limit.

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