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Can a married couple get a mortgage in only one of their names?

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2005-10-01 21:18:16
2005-10-01 21:18:16

No. I went through this very same situation. I kept my maiden name and after marrying we wanted to buy a house. In every application they required both names on all the papers. Most cases when I asked why they would say it was to protect the rights of both spouses. I think its more to protect there investment. Which I learned later was actually a good thing. In major investments its always wise to have both parties on all forms The only reason I can imagine one not wanting both names is if one name will hurt there chances of approval. Best advice I can tell you is contact your lawyer and ask them the what the law requires in your state. YES! We just got a home loan in my husbands name only. His credit score was better than mine and our lender said it would be better to only have him on the loan. Eventually we are going to have my name added to the title to the house and that will require an attorney. Good luck to you!

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