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Answered 2015-02-04 16:15:16

Yes. If the non custodial parent is denied visitation as outlined in the court order than the custodial parent is in contempt. Perhaps you should also establish a neutral exchange site and request the each parent notify the other parent within 48hrs any change in address or phone number.

The custodial parent should know where the child will be when she is with the non-custodial parent. If something should happen to the non-custodial parent the custodial parent should know where to get the child. Wanting to keep that type of information secret shows a problem of non-cooperation and a parent who is not thinking of the best interests of the child.

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No, they are separate issues. If the custodial parent stops visitations they would be in violation of a court order. The custodial parent must address the child support arrears as a separate matter by filing a contempt order with the court.


If a visitation order has been granted by the court, the court would need to have been informed of the address of the non custodial parent and approved of such before the visitation order was granted. There are circumstances under which the court will allow the visiting parent to not disclose his or her address to the custodial parent, but said parent must provide other contact information, (phone numbers, grandparents address, numbers, etc.). If the custodial parent believes allowing the children to participate in visitation when the cited circumstances exist, he or she should petition the court to have the visitation order amended to a suitable arrangement for all parties. The best option is to seek guidance from the attorney who handled the custodial case.


No. The custodial parent is required to obey the court ordered visitation schedule. If they do not the non-custodial parent can file a petition for contempt of a court order and that will cause problems for the custodial parent. The custodial parent must discuss with the child the reasons why they do not want to go on visits and try to define and address the problems. If the issues are serious the custodial parent can engage professional help and file a petition to modify the visitation order. They must provide compelling evidence to the court to support their petition and it will be up to the judge.


If the non-custodial parent is not barred from seeing the child, it would be VERY strange if the custody order(s) did not address visitation. If the custodial parent is denying the non-custodial parent court allowed access, then the custodial parent is in contempt of the court's order. My suggestion would be for the non-custodial parent to return to the court with this information - DO NOT attempt to 'force' the situation as it could wind up back-firing on you.


If the NCP is obligated to pay support or has visitation rights, yes.


No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.


For safety reasons the custodial parent should know where the child will be in case something happens to the non-custodial parent or if the child is not returned. If the non-custodial parent won't cooperate the custodial parent should return to court and request a court order.


Absolutely. Just notify the courts of the address change if you have a court order for sole custody and there is no visitation order for the non-custodial parent. I dont know about joint custody.


No, it's the custodial parent's responsibility to see to that the court order is followed. If the visitation order is not followed the custodial parent will be in contempt of a court order and could eventually lose custody. It would be better to discuss the reasons why the children are uncomfortable about visiting and the try to address their complaints. The parents should try to get along and not alienate the children in any way.


No. Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge. A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spend quality time with the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's environment.


Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge if that becomes necessary. Either parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. First, the parents must discuss this problem to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. Divorce and separation from one parent is always hard on a child. It is natural for them to encounter difficulties with visitation schedules. It is important to talk with the child and comfort them. Find out if anything at the custodial parent's home is bothering them. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. On the other hand, the child may only need to be reminded that they will be with the non-custodial parent again in a few days. If the child's concerns are serious and the custodial parent will not cooperate, the non-custodial parent may need to return to court to request a modification of the custody and visitation order. Alternatively, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm. The bottom line is that parents need to work together to address this type of problem.


You should be able to ask the judge who presided over the divorce, or if there is a caseworker assigned to the family, that would be a better place to start. * A sixteen-year-old does not have that right automatically. Legally, the father still has the right to his visitation time. If a father is emotionally or physically abusive, the mother or an attorney acting on behalf of the child may petition the court for a change in the custoday order. * No, minors are not allowed to make such decisions when there is a visitation order in place. Generally the law does not address issues of alledged emotional or verbal abuse as there is such a wide definition of such behavior. The custodial parent can petition for a change in the visitation rights of the non custodial parent, but rarely will visitation be suspended under the cited circumstances, however, supervised visitation might be an option.


As long at it does not address an issue of safety of the child, no they cannot.


A form of address for a man or boy that was used to express contempt.


Yes. The non-custodial can move. However, that parent must provide the custodial parent with their new address and visitations may become a source of problems. Therefore, you should file a modification of your visitation agreement prior to the move so that the need for travel and the added expenses for long distance visitations will be addressed in a new order. This is especially important if you will be moving to another state. Generally, states will honor and enforce court ordered child support and custody orders from other states.


Of course. The non-custodial parent has a right to know where their child is living unless their parental rights have been terminated by a court order.


The following is general since you didn't include any details.First, you should make certain the school is notified that you are the custodial parent and you should provide the school with a certified copy of the decree that awarded sole legal custody to you. If you have sole legal custody you should inform the school that the non-custodial parent is not allowed to take the child during the school day or pick the child up when school is dismissed. If the non-custodial parent persists in trying to take the child from school then you will need to address the situation in court.If the non-custodial parent is allowed to pick the child up after school pursuant to your visitation order then you must obey the order.The following is general since you didn't include any details.First, you should make certain the school is notified that you are the custodial parent and you should provide the school with a certified copy of the decree that awarded sole legal custody to you. If you have sole legal custody you should inform the school that the non-custodial parent is not allowed to take the child during the school day or pick the child up when school is dismissed. If the non-custodial parent persists in trying to take the child from school then you will need to address the situation in court.If the non-custodial parent is allowed to pick the child up after school pursuant to your visitation order then you must obey the order.The following is general since you didn't include any details.First, you should make certain the school is notified that you are the custodial parent and you should provide the school with a certified copy of the decree that awarded sole legal custody to you. If you have sole legal custody you should inform the school that the non-custodial parent is not allowed to take the child during the school day or pick the child up when school is dismissed. If the non-custodial parent persists in trying to take the child from school then you will need to address the situation in court.If the non-custodial parent is allowed to pick the child up after school pursuant to your visitation order then you must obey the order.The following is general since you didn't include any details.First, you should make certain the school is notified that you are the custodial parent and you should provide the school with a certified copy of the decree that awarded sole legal custody to you. If you have sole legal custody you should inform the school that the non-custodial parent is not allowed to take the child during the school day or pick the child up when school is dismissed. If the non-custodial parent persists in trying to take the child from school then you will need to address the situation in court.If the non-custodial parent is allowed to pick the child up after school pursuant to your visitation order then you must obey the order.


Of course. The custodial parent should know where the child will be when she is with the non-custodial parent. If something should happen to the non-custodial parent the custodial parent should know where to get the child. Wanting to keep that type of information secret shows a problem of non-cooperation and a parent who is not thinking of the best interests of the child.


Generally the noncustodial parent may move anywhere - within or outside the state where the children live. The court grants the noncustodial parent the right to visit the children but does not force the noncustodial parent to take advantage of that right. However, a court may require the noncustodial parent to provide the custodial parent with contact information and, where issues develop about the care or safety of the children, the court may require supervised visitation or at least that the noncustodial parent advise the custodial parent where the children will be.


they only have to inform the custodial parent of the change of address if they still wish to contact the childAnswerIf they want to stay in contact with that person or the child or if you are having to pay a certain amount for the child then yes of course otherwise it is up to your own discretion


No. There is no law that says a parent must have contact with children. And that is justly so. It would seem a parent who was forced to have visitation would not be able to meet the emotional needs of the children.


No. The situation would need to be serious enough for the court to address the issue and render a new order. The custodial parent would need to bring the child's concerns to the attention of the court and allow the court to investigate.


This is definitely a matter that needs to be discussed with an attorney. If there is already a child support and visitation order in place the custodial parent will need to file a motion to get the court's permission to move the child out of state. The court will make a determination that is in the best interest of the child. It will consider how visitations will be arranged and how they will be paid for so as not to cause financial hardship for the non-custodial parent. If there is no prior court order and the non-custodial parent has not been paying child support nor spending time with the child the custodial parent can try relocating. However, there is always the chance the non-custodial parent will seek rights and it may be more expensive later on to address this issue. You should seek the advice of an attorney who specializes in family law in your state who can review your situation and explain your options.


Go to the court of jurisdiction and file an emergency injunction temporarily stopping visitation rights based on the same. It is your right to know exactly where your child will be staying during visitation and if the location is unsuitable, it is also your right to request visitation modification based on the same including termination of visitation or supervised visitation.


I can answer questions about child support and related issues, as I am a retired State Child Support Enforcement Director. However, the question being asked is not clear enough for me to address. In general the issue of child support and visitation orders are two separate and independent issues. The law requires a non custodial parent to pay child support. If the non custodial parent is working in most cases the law requires the employer to withhold the child support from the non custodial parents pay check. All custodial parents can have their State's child support case, or a search for a missing non custodial parent be administered by their State's Child Support Enforcement Office (every State has one). Their may be a small fee charged depending on the State. Once you are living separately from an absent parent, married or not he/she is required to pay child support. Custody and visitation orders are in most States.handled through Family Court and an individual parent must file legal documents through the court for custody and visitation orders to be resolved In most cases an attorney is needed.



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