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Answered 2012-06-27 20:31:47

It's not the custodial parent who can end a court ordered visitation, only the court can do that. But if the non-custodial parent gives up the parental rights or they are taken away by the court, the custodial parent will still recieve child support.

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The custodial parent cannot deny visitation of the non-custodial parent if there is a court order in place. Only the court can rescind visitation privileges or terminate parental rights. If there is no court ordered visitation the custodial parent has the right to use their discretion. If however, the non-custodial parent decides to file for visitation rights; the refusal for visitation will not be looked upon favorably by the court unless there are acceptable reasons for it having been done.


A child who enters the military will likely be considered "emancipated" and, in such a case, the courts would terminate support.


The custodial parent is the parent in which the child resides with. My son lives with me and I am the custodial parent, his dad has visitation rights and pays child support.



No, child support is calculated based on physical custody, which is different than visitation time. If you are not receiving your court-ordered visitation, contact your local Department of Human Services and let them know. However, you must still pay your court-ordered child support.


Yes, but keep in mind that relinquishing parental rights does not terminate support.


First thing..in Indiana...most courts view support and visitation as two separate issues. If the support is required through the courts the judge will ask what the visitation is at that time. However, if the non-custodial parent wants to get visitation without the custodial parents agreement, the non-custodial parent will have to file a request with the court and have a judge issue visitation. If there is no visitation order in place by a judge/court, the custodial parent has no legal requirement to permit visitation. I have dealt with this issue personally as well as my sibling, me being a custodial parent my sibling being a non-custodial parent. So I have seen what happens from both sides. Basically if it something isn't ordered by a judge/court, there is no legal requirement to do visitation or support.


Whether or not a parent is paying child support is irrelevant when the issue is visitation rights. If there is a court order for visitation the primary custodial parent must allow it or be found in contempt of court. If there is not a court order in place the custodial parent can make the decision to when, where or if visitation is allowed. Visitation guidelines are usually established during the custodial proceedings.


In most cases the parent who has the child doesn't have to pay child support. The parent who does not have the child pays child support if they want visitation rights. In most jurisdictions, the non custodial parent must pay child support even without visitation rights.


It's not the parent who decide whether there will be visitation rights or not, that is the court and a parent is not obligated to petition for one. A parent can not be forced to have a relationship with their child. Apart from paying child support.


Child support and custody/visitation are separate issues. You should contact your local courts to file for visitation/custody if the custodial parent is denying visitation.


No. Child support and visitation rights are two separate issues/ The parent being denied visitation must continue to pay the support order. The non custodial parent may find it necessary to file a petition (lawsuit) against the custodial parent to asssure his or her visitation rights are enforced.



No. That authority is not given to a custodial parent. Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent must pursue contempt of court charges in order to collect arrears. She cannot refuse to follow the visitation order.No. That authority is not given to a custodial parent. Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent must pursue contempt of court charges in order to collect arrears. She cannot refuse to follow the visitation order.No. That authority is not given to a custodial parent. Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent must pursue contempt of court charges in order to collect arrears. She cannot refuse to follow the visitation order.No. That authority is not given to a custodial parent. Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent must pursue contempt of court charges in order to collect arrears. She cannot refuse to follow the visitation order.



If there is a court order for visitation privileges it must be obeyed. Visitation and child support are treated as two entirely different issues. Just as an obligated parent is in contempt of a court order when they do not pay the mandated child support a custodial parent could be in contempt for not adhering to the visitation terms.


Petition the court to terminate the visitation with th guardian until the jailed parent is released from jail.



Once paternity is established, the non-custodial parent has the right to request visitation, just as the custodial parent has the right to request support.


No. Visitation and child support are 2 separate issues and changing any of the court orders you have to go back to the court that issued them. There might be good reasons why a parent can not pay all of a sudden and denying the child a parent because of it is not in the best interest of the child. Visitation is not an award for paying child support.


In general, the parent or guardian with the most parenting time is eligible to receive child support from the non-custodial parent. You do not need to be the child's biological parent to receive child support.


In every state a parent is required to pay to support their child, and they cannot dodge that by saying they don't want to see the kid. I would file for custody and get it in writing that the other parent is not requesting visitation, then file for support.


In general, no. Child Support and Custody/Visitation are separate issues and addressed in separate court orders. A parent who is under a child support order must petition the court for a visitation schedule. For more accurate information please specify your jurisdiction.


Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent can file a suit for child support but cannot deny the non custodial parent custodial or vistation rights is said parent wants those rights. That being said, the non custodial parent can file for custody or visitation regardless of whether the child support issue is addressed or not. Such matters are decided by the court if the parents cannot find an equitable solution.