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Answered 2005-08-22 18:06:06

They can come onto your property because you gave them permission when you signed the loan.If it someone elses property that is trespass but after they have the vehicle the point is moot as long as they didn't damage the property.

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While there are some limitations (e.g., "peaceful repossession", can't enter a locked building or cross a locked gate), yes, they can.


First question: Yes, they can come on private property, with some limitations. They may not enter an enclosed building or cross a locked gate. Second question: Unless they gain consent of the owner of that vehicle, they cannot enter or move any other vehicle in order to get to the vehicle they're repossessing.


A car that is actually YOURS cannot be repossessed, as it's paid off. If you have a vehicle being repossessed, they're able to do this because it's actually the finance company which owns that vehicle and possesses their title. A recovery agent can, on behalf of the lienholder, go onto private property in order to recover the lienholder's property - with limitations. They cannot cross a locked gate, and they cannot enter a locked building.


YES. The repo company can take the car from anywhere they want with the exception of a boot on the vehicle and/or the vehicle is in a locked property such as behind a locked fence surrounding the property or locked inside of a garage. If you do not let the person onto your property with a locked fence surrounding this is a voilation of the law and ofcourse YOU can have them arrested on the spot.



Repossession laws vary from state to state. Typically, if the vehicle is behind (or in) a locked enclosure, they cannot enter and take it.


I guess he would need to use a helicopter since he cannot breach the peace. Breaking the lock or fence would be disturbing the peace, I think.



In general, yes, provided that there is no "breach of the peace", which means that you cannot break into a locked garage or cause any damage to property.


Legally probably not,that assumes you do not own the propery or the property(like a private road) to get to your property so that would be trespass.But someone has to call the police to enforce the trespass violation.After the repo guy has the car there is not much you can do except to sue the lender or repo guy. Gated,YES.Gated and locked no.


AnswerYes, as long as it is not inside a garage or building that is either locked or unlocked. The other exception is the repossession agency may not commit a breach of peace as defined by state law while recovering a vehicle.. Also the repossession agency is not allowed to cause property damage in order to take possession of the vehicle,such as if the vehicle has a chain/cable wrapped around the rear axle secured to a pole with a padlock..They can not cut the chain/cable or the padlock because doing so is malicious destruction of property....


NO THIS IS ILLEGAL! They cannot go inside your house, garage, or locked private property


can my car be repossesed from my locked back yard



NO! It would require a court order. The garage is private property and the owner has the right to keep it secured. If an attempt is made to remove the car from the garage (locked or not) the repo. agency has committed a Breach of Peace. Which may result in fines and the loss of the lender's right to any deficiency judgment.


Yes, as long as it does not constitute a breach of peace, such as attempting to remove a vehicle from a locked or unlocked garage. Unless the property is legally posted.


Yes, if it was not locked. They cannot breach the peace to repossess a vehicle but they can come on your property to get their property, namely the car you do not own. It is their car until you pay for it. So legally they have only recovered their property.


It depends on local laws. In most cities, universities, etc. it is illegal to chain a bike to a handrail, tree, signpost, lamppost, telephone pole, fence, etc. that is on public property. In such a case, a bicycle is required to be locked to a bicycle rack. On private property, where bikes can and cannot be locked up is up to the property owner.


No one has the right to enter your property to repo a vehicle. I your vehicle is out in the street, then its fair game. If you see the repo man coming but has not hooked up to your vehicle, you legally still have possession of the vehicle. Once the vehicle has made contact with the truck the vehicle belongs to him.


A public network is one that is not locked and can be accessed by different people. A private network is usually locked and can only be accessed by the owner.


Yes. Since the vehicle is no longer the property of the former owner, the lending institution is allowed to have their agent (repo man) recover their property for them. Their agent is allowed to go anywhere that is not fenced, locked or otherwise restricted. If you deliberatel hide the vehicle or prevent the lending institution from gaining acces, it can be considered a form of theft, since the vehicle is no longer yours. * In addition, if the lender has obtained a replevin order the vehicle must be surrendered. When a court order has been issued the agent may enter a locked area or posted area or do whatever necessary short of physical violence or property damage to seize the vehicle, cutting a chain and/or a lock is not considered property damage. Be advised, in most states attempting to hide or prevent repossession of a vehicle where a replevin order is in place can create serious legal consequences for the borrower.


They can go where they have open access to reacquire the lienholder's property. They cannot force their way through a locked door, cross a locked gate, or enter a vehicle other than the one up for repossession.


In some places it is not permitted for a repo man to enter a closed garage. In California, for example, a repo person can come on to private property to locate and take a vehicle, but cannot enter a locked placed, can't go inside the house, can't threaten or bully. This is not universal. In some areas the repo man can break open locks, etc.


Yes they can. The only exception to this - Is if your yard has a locked or closed fence. If your yard is secured by a fence the "repo" men/women cannot legally enter your yard.




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