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Answered 2006-07-11 12:22:07

No. All transfers, sale, purchase of property or any major financial transaction must have the consent of the trustee in charge of the chapter 13 bankruptcy. The state of residency is not relevant, nor whether it is a federal or state bankruptcy.

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Yes, with bankruptcy court approval.


The chapter 13 petitioner/participant must receive the approval of the bankruptcy trustee for all major financial transactions.


The answer to this question depends on whether you are filing Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, if the rental property has equity, meaning that the value of the property exceeds what is owed on the property, the trustee would almost definitely seize property and sell it to satisfy some or all of your unsecured debts.


Typically a Chapter 13 bankruptcy will require you to enter into a payment plan with the IRS, and interest will be frozen as of the date that you file your bankruptcy petition.


No, any activity that increases your debt, or invoves your property, would require court approval. You would be able to if the court approves.


Yes and no. No you cannot file for two types of bankruptcy at the SAME time. But yes you can file for chapter 7 bankruptcy if you were unable to complete chapter 13, which is very common. This can be done once for any reason, without court approval. However, to switch back, approval of the bankruptcy court is required, and they will rarely allow a debtor to make multiple switches. Note that in switching from Chapter 13 to Chapter 7, much of the debtor's property is now up for grabs to be sold off to pay his or her debts. However, if the debtor cannot make the payments under a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, switching to Chapter 7 may be his or her only option.


Chapter 7 is called Liquidation Under the Bankruptcy Code and is the chapter of the Bankruptcy Code providing for "liquidation,", the sale of a debtor's nonexempt property and the distribution of the proceeds to creditors.


Yes, and this happens often. A debtor who cannot meet the obligations of the payment plan imposed by Chapter 13 Bankruptcy may wish to switch to Chapter 7. This can be done once for any reason, without court approval. However, to switch back, approval of the bankruptcy court is required, and they will rarely allow a debtor to make multiple switches. Note that in switching from Chapter 13 to Chapter 7, much of the debtor's property is now up for grabs to be sold off to pay his or her debts. However, if the debtor cannot make the payments under a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, switching to Chapter 7 may be his or her only option.


In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you ask the bankruptcy court to discharge most of the debts you owe. In exchange for this discharge, the bankruptcy trustee can take any property you own that is not exempt from collection.


I think chapter 7 bankruptcy at least take 5 to 6 years to clear the bankruptcy so its automatically remain on your name for those years.You will get your property only after this case is complete.


No, unless you get relief from stay from the bankruptcy court.


Sometimes, a debtor who cannot meet the obligations of the payment plan imposed by Chapter 13 Bankruptcy may wish to switch to Chapter 7. This can be done once for any reason, without court approval. However, to switch back, approval of the bankruptcy court is required, and they will rarely allow a debtor to make multiple switches. Note that in switching from Chapter 13 to Chapter 7, much of your property is now up for grabs to be sold off to pay your debts. However, if you cannot make the payments under a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, switching to Chapter 7 may be your only option.


The exemptions for Chapter 7 bankruptcy are that exemptions help to determine which property one gets to keep. There are some exemption schemes one can use to stay out of bankruptcy.


Parking tickets cannot be discharged under Chapter 7 bankruptcy. They can, however, be discharged under Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Chapter 7 bankruptcy is known as "liquidation" bankruptcy. This generally means that all of a debtor's non-exempt property may be sold by a bankruptcy trustee, though the laws for property exemption are different in each state. For example, in New York, most debtors are able to keep all of their property. Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a 'reorganization of debts', and allows the individual to keep their property and income while paying off all or part of their debt over a three to five year period. In the case of a Chapter 13 bankruptcy filing, the parking tickets can be considered "unsecured" debts (similar to credit cards and medical bills), and can thus be treated as such for repayment.



When filing chapter 7 bankruptcy there are statutory limits on inherited property. If the value of your property falls below those limits you may keep it. If it is over the limit you will likely lose the property to the trustees. Another option is to file Chapter 13 and you will be able to keep the property.


Although most debtors keep all their property after filing a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, debtors must file exemptions when applying for this type of bankruptcy just like they do when they file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Filing exemptions in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy is for the benefit of creditors rather than the debtor himself. The exemptions inform the creditor of how much she is entitled to and allows her to compare the settlement of the case with the settlement the creditor would receive if the debtor filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy instead.Best Interest of Creditors TestU.S. bankruptcy law requires Chapter 13 bankruptcy applications to pass the "best interest of creditors test." Creditors involved in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy must receive at least as much from the bankruptcy as they would if the debtor filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy instead. The bankruptcy trustee performs this test by deducting the debtor's exemptions from the full value of the estate to determine how much the estate would be worth if the debtor filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Creditors may receive more from Chapter 13 than they would from Chapter 7, but they may not receive less from Chapter 13.Determining Payment AmountChapter 13 exemptions, or more specifically, the best interest of creditors test, are also used to determine how much the debtor must pay over the lifetime of the plan. To make this determination, the bankruptcy trustee compares three numbers. The best interest of creditors test, or the non-exempt value of the estate minus administrative costs, is one of these three numbers. The total amount of priority claims, such as alimony, child support and back taxes owed, is another number the bankruptcy trustee looks at, as is the debtor's disposable income, or income after payroll taxes each pay period. The bankruptcy trustee takes the biggest of these numbers and divides it by the life of the plan to determine how much the debtor must pay each month.ConsiderationsChapter 13 bankruptcy may be attractive to some debtors because debtors are at low risk of losing their property through this arrangement and there are no income limitations on this type of bankruptcy. However, debtors cant file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy if they have such large exemptions that the bankruptcy will fail the best interest of creditors test. In addition, Chapter 13 bankruptcy negatively affects the debtor's credit for seven years and requires debtors to pay the bankruptcy trustee on a monthly basis.


In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the bankruptcy trustee cancels many (or all) of your debts. At the same time it might also sell (liquidate) some of your property to pay your creditors. Chapter 7 bankruptcy, also called "straight" or "liquidation" bankruptcy, is so named because the law is contained in Chapter 7 of the federal Bankruptcy Code.


No. If it is not covered by the allowed bankruptcy exemptions then it is subject to seizure and sale or liquidation. The filer always has the option to have the bankruptcy dismissed,


In the event of chapter 7 bankruptcy, you may retain possession of secured property only in the event you reaffirm with the lender. In the event no reaffirmation is signed for each piece of property, the property that has not been reaffirmed must be returned to the lender. If non-reaffirmed property is not returned to the lien holder (lender), that party may seek or continue with repossession of that property and any unpaid balance that is not forgiven by the chapter 7 once the bankruptcy is dismissed or discharged and the stay is lifted.


In a chapter 7, no post petition income constitutes property of the bankruptcy estate. So to answer, no. In a chapter 13 or 11, all post petition income constitutes property of the estate.


If you are in a Chapter 13, then you must get approval from the trustee if you wish to incur more debt.


Yes, this is actually a common thing for people to do when they cannot maintain the strict payment schedule of a chapter 13 bankruptcy. This can be done once for any reason, without court approval. However, to switch back, approval of the bankruptcy court is required, and they will rarely allow a debtor to make multiple switches. Keep in mind that these are different types of bankruptcy so some items that may not have been up for grabs to creditors with a chapter 13 are available to be sold in a chapter 7.



The Chapter 13 bankruptcy law allows a debtor to keep their property and pay their debt over time, usually over a period of between three to five years.



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