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Answered 2013-02-23 17:33:32

Yes, there is no bar in the insured person being beneficiary on another insurance policy.

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The beneficiary benefits financially from the life insurance policy by receiving the proceeds of the policy. The beneficiary is the person(s) or entity who is designated by the insured person to receive the proceeds from the life insurance policy upon the death of the insured person. The insured person also benefits from knowing (peac eof mind) they have secured financial protection for the beneficiary in case the insured person dies.


Only the owner of the life insurance policy can change the beneficiary designations. In many case the owner is the insured. Check your policy for the definitions or call your agent.


Only the POLICY OWNER can change the beneficiary on a life insurance policy. In most cases, the insured is also the policy owner, but it's not a general rule. The policy owner can be another person who is paying the premium (for example, a parent or guardian, spouse or other family member), or a bank, or a business. If the policy owner is not the same person as the insured, then the insured has no control over who the beneficiary is on the policy.


A Contingent or Secondary Beneficiary will receive the proceeds from a life insurance policy after the Insured's deaths, if the Primary Beneficiary does not survive the Insured Person. This means, if the primary beneficiary is not alive at the time of death of the insured person, then the contingent beneficiary will receive the proceeds from the life insurance policy. Examples of situations which may give rise to the contingent beneficiary receiving the proceeds from a life insurance policy. 1. The insured and primary beneficiary die in an accident together, for example, a car accident. 2. The primary beneciairy dies, and the insured forgets to update the beneficiaries for his/her life insurance policy.


The Insured can change the beneficiary on a life insurance contract.


Yes, the policy owner can change the beneficiary. Sometimes, the person insured and the policy owner are not the same person, if someone else pays the premium for the insurance policy. For example, a parent or guardian taking an insurance policy on spouse or children. Some insurance policies are assigned to cover bank loans, and even if the insured may pay the premium, the bank can be assigned as the owner of the policy; in that case the bank decides who the beneficiary is going to be (usually in this scenario, the bank will also be the beneficiary).


The question does not really involve "should". The direct answer is "no". Using life insurance as an example, the owner of the policy is often the person who pays the premium. The insurance contract gives the owner various rights, such as to initially designate the beneficiary, change the beneficiary, pledge the policy as security for a loan, and other acts. The insured is the person whose life is, well, insured. Stated otherwise, this means that when the insured dies, the insurance company generally pays the death benefit to the beneficiary.


No. The contingency that triggers payment of a life insurance is the death of the named insured. That person could have changed the beneficiary designation prior to his/her death. Even if the policy had given the power to change the beneficiary to another person, the change would have had to be exercised before the named insured dies.


No. You do not own the policy. You will only receive the policy proceeds after the insured person dies.


If an insured has a policy where there is no named beneficiary, or the named beneficiary is deceased, then the benefit will be paid to the insured's estate.


The insured can never amend his insurance policy without the consent of his irrevocable beneficiary because this act would lessen or diminish what is due to the irrevocable beneficiary and thus considering that this is a diminution...consent of the IR beneficiary is necessary.


Generally, if the beneficiary is deceased, the proceeds go to the contingent beneficiary, or if none, to the estate of the insured. An attorney must be consulted to direct you on how to handle this in your state. It depends on whether the beneficiary predeceased the insured. If the beneficiary died before the insured then the proceeds go the the contingent beneficiary. If there is not a contingent, check the contract, it probably is paid to the Owner of the Estate of the Insured. If the Beneficiary died after the Insured, the proceeds go to the Beneficiary's Estate. It is important to have a contingent beneficiary specified in your life insurance policy. This way, if the beneficiary passes away, the contingent beneficiary will benefit. If there is no contingent beneficiary, and the beneficiary has deceased, the proceeds of the life insurance policy, go to the estate and is distributed according to the Will.


I assume you are talking about life insurance. As the policy owner, you have no right to benefits so there is nothing for you to do. Benefits are only payable to the beneficiary unless all beneficiaries are deceased prior to the insured then it would be paid to the estate of the beneficiary. The owner of the policy basically has control of the policy before the insured dies. They are the only one who can change address, payment method, beneficiary, etc. If the owner is not the insured then the owner is the only person who can make policy changes. The insured person has no control over the policy if a different person is the owner but after death the owner has no more rights. Also, all life insurance is tax free as long as you never deducted the premiums for tax purposes.


When a life insurance policy is purchased, the purchaser (usually the insured) designates a primary beneficiary and a contingent beneficiary. The contingent beneficiary gets the proceeds if the primary beneficiary predeceases the insured. The insured can name a new primary beneficiary by contacting the insurance company or the insurance agent. THIS IS ONLY TRUE FOR PURCHASED LIFE POLICIES___ NOT POLICIES THROUGH AN EMPLOYER UNDER ERISA.


Perhaps this question could be rephrased. The answer to the question as posed is: after the death of the insured, the policy becomes void, and the benefits payable. The simple answer is no, you as the owner can not change the beneficiary after the death of the insured (subject of insurance).


Yes. The policy is controlled by the "owner"of the policy. If the insured person is the owner, then the beneficiary should be written as "irrevocable." An "irrevocable" beneficiary can only be changed with the consent of that beneficiary, regardless of who the policy "owner" is. Hope this helps.


A secondary beneficiary is a person who would receive the benefits of a life insurance policy or retirement plan in the event that the insured person dies and the primary beneficiary has also passed away. Then, the secondary beneficiary would receive the benefits.


If the beneficiary of a life insurance policy predeceases the insured, the insured should make arrangements to name a new beneficiary. If they do not, the policy proceeds will become part of their estate if they die without naming a new beneficiary. You should consult with the insurance company.


You cannot purchase insurance on someone without their knowledge and participation. The insured has to answer the underwriting questions in person and sign the application in the presence of the insurance agent. The insured does not have to be the policy owner or payer. The owner is the only person that can make changes to the policy including changing beneficiary, address, payment method, etc.


I don't really understand the question. I assume you mean can you take out a life insurance policy on your husband? The person who is being insured must answer the underwriting questions on the application in person and must sign the application and be witnessed by a third unrelated person. Normally the agent is the witness. An important fact is the owner of the policy. The owner is the person who has complete control of the policy after it is issued. Only the owner can change the address, change the beneficiary, etc. Most of the time the owner is the insured but not always. The beneficiary must have an "insurable interest" at the time the policy is taken out. For instance if a husband is insured and the owner of a life insurance policy. He can make his wife the beneficiary but if they divorce he and only he can change the beneficiary and no notice has to be sent to the former beneficiary.


If no beneficiary is listed on a life insurance policy then the benefits are payable to the insured's estate. The beneficiary can be changed at any time prior to the death of the insured if this is the person's desire.


In regards to life insurance, contingent usually means secondary. For example a contingent beneficiary is a secondary beneficiary, not the primary beneficiary. The contingent beneficiary would receive the proceeds from a life insurance policy if the primary beneficiary were not alive when the insured person dies.


The owner of the policy can change the beneficiary of the policy. If the original beneficiary has died before the insured, the owner of the policy can designate a new beneficiary at any time.


You are very entitled. But they do not have to tell any information about the policy, without consent of the insured. Yes, if the insured person has passed and you are the beneficiary, you should call the insurance company and go through their steps to claim the benefit. It is the responsibility of someone that knows the Insured has passed to inform the Insurance Company. If no one tells them, they will assume that the insured no longer wants the policy and they will cancel it. It will require you to show a signed sealed death certificate and possibly other documents. It is sometimes different for each company. They then will issue a check to the person(s) listed on the policy as the beneficiary.


An insurance policy is a contract between an insurance company and the person purchasing the policy (or the insured). The policy costs a specified amount and if all premiums are paid in a timely manner, once the insured has died, their beneficiary (who whomever they name) will be paid a sum of money.



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