Child Support
Repossession
Liens

Can child support in Massachusetts seize or put a lien on a house even if the house has two owners?

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2010-01-22 16:23:06
2010-01-22 16:23:06

Yes they can.

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Yes they can put a lien on the house. Just had to do it about three years ago because I had not gotten support in years.

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The State child support agency can file a lien on the house.

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No. Child support is owed to the parent or other caretaker with whom the child lives.

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Children are not "emancipated" from child support. They are "entitled" to financial support by the non-custodial parent. In general, children become emancipated by leaving their parent(s)' house and becoming self-supporting. Child support is usually not due for an emancipated child.

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Yes, major assets such as a car or a house can be seized in order to pay child support.

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Only if the married couple reside in a community property state and the property was bought during the marriage.

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Hopefully your credit history will carry the day so that you can finance the house. Otherwise, wait until the child support is paid up.

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Go to your local court house and talk to the secretary or clerk and ask for forms to fill out to ask for an increase in child support. Petition the judge to increase child support.

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Your ex is paying CHILD SUPPORT so you can SUPPORT your KIDS. Your ex would be paying for the clothing no matter what.

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The State can place a lien on the house if the father is on the title.

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I assume you're talking about online courses, and yes, if your state law or court order, requires child support through college. Dads House

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Massachusetts State House was created in 1798.

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No. Sad but true. The parent receiving the support does not have to provide proof of how it is being spent. Child support is in place to help house, feed, clothe and educate the child. If it pays an electric bill, then that is what it pays.

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"lieu" ... only with the court's approval

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Yes, unless the child is emancipated. Look at your child support order. It typically includes something to the effect of "support shall continue until the child reaches the age of 18, dies, marries, or becomes emancipated."

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You should have gone to file for immediate custody as well as child support to be stopped after not hearing from the mother after a week. Your best chance would have been to inform the child support agency and the family law office at the court house what has happened and they can help you.

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You are obligated to pay child support until the court notifies you otherwise. Petition the court to have this rectified.

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Not unless the child is age of majority (usually 18) in your state. Moving out does not emancipate them and until then you are obligated to support them. A minor can also not move out without your consent and you are still responsible for what they do.

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With the court's permission, which strikes me as unlikely because it will not result in any income for the child.

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You HAVE to go through the court system. Go online to the court house where your support papers were drawn up (This is were you have to file paperwork). You need to file for a modification in child support. Also, check your originals to make sure there are no clauses about continuing support after 18 if the child goes into secondary education.

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Answer: If the survivorship was set forth in the deed, a joint tenancy, the passing of title to the other joint owners is not an inheritance. In Massachusetts is would be a non-probate asset.

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yes, but you have to go to court and prove it.

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Contact the court house. If not, do it yourself. see links


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