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2014-06-25 17:31:04
2014-06-25 17:31:04

No a custodial parent can not kick a child out of school if the child is still a minor. If the child is 18 years old, the parent may kick them out.

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Go to the school, bringing necessary documents to prove you are the parent, and find out if the child is still attending school there. Even though you aren't the custodial parent, you do still have a right to know if your child is still enrolled at school. They should be required to tell you, unless there are extenuating circumstances which would prevent them from doing so.


Of course. Unless the non-custodial parent takes sole custody, the non-custodial parent is still responsible for paying child support to whomever the child goes to. There is no reason the death of a parent should terminate the other parent's child support obligation.


what if the noncustodial parent still reside with the custodial parent, is noncustodial parent still obligated to pay childsupport


No. The child is now eighteen and he or she can make their own decision although that may cause trouble if the child still lives with the "custodial" parent.


Not usually, but there are some cases in which you might. 1. Some states require the non-custodial parent to continue to pay child support if the child hasn't graduated high school and is still living with the custodial parent. 2. If the child is disabled, there is no cut off age for ending child support. The non-custodial parent will continue to owe child support for as long as the disabled child lives with the custodial parent.


No, it's up to the court. However, the non custodial parent would traditionally become the custodial parent. The parent should always have first right to their child!



It's not the custodial parent who can end a court ordered visitation, only the court can do that. But if the non-custodial parent gives up the parental rights or they are taken away by the court, the custodial parent will still recieve child support.


Yes. The fact that the custodial parent got married has no impact on child support.


If the support order included a provision continuing support while the child was enrolled in college it does not matter where the child is living, as the support is to reimburse the custodial parent for the non custodial parents share of the child's expenses. If the child is attending school the custodial parent is likely still paying expenses for that child regardless of where they are living


it all depends on what state the parent is? but it does not matter if he is undocumented or not he still has to pay regardless of status.


Yes. They are still the child's parent and responsible for supporting their child.


In Massachusetts: If there is a child support order (issued by the court) then the 'non-custodial' parent will have to pay child support to the 'custodial' parent until the child support order is modified by the court. Even if the kids actually live with the 'non-custodial' parent, that parent still has to follow the current court orders, no matter how unfair. If the kids are living with the non-custodial parent, though, it shouldn't be too difficult to go into court and get the child support order changed.


No, the custodial parent does not have topay anything to the other parent. The NON-custodial parent will still have to pay something as their contribution to the support of the child(ren) , but because of the difference in incomes it may be fairly small.


Yes, if the court determines the custodial parent is unfit and the child would be better off with the father. However, he will still owe the arrears to the other parent.Yes, if the court determines the custodial parent is unfit and the child would be better off with the father. However, he will still owe the arrears to the other parent.Yes, if the court determines the custodial parent is unfit and the child would be better off with the father. However, he will still owe the arrears to the other parent.Yes, if the court determines the custodial parent is unfit and the child would be better off with the father. However, he will still owe the arrears to the other parent.


In this case the other parent is no longer the custodial parent. If the child is now staying with another guardian, they are now considered the custodial guardian and child support should be paid to them.


Yes, however, you possibly have recourse if soon after the custodial parent leaves, you file a modification with the court. If the parent left with the child without the court's permission, some courts will require that they return with the child.


Of course. The child is still your child and you must continue to pay child support unless the new spouse legally adopts your child. In that case, your parental rights would end.


Yes. The marital status of the custodial parent change does not change the obligation of the noncustodial parent.


No. The child is well within his/her rights to choose not to see the non-custodial parent. However, the non-custodial parent still contributed to that child being born, and is therefore required to help provide for him/her.



If the custodial parent moves out of state from where child support is issued do you still have to make payments to that state if the custodial parent lives in another state?



Yes, unless the non-custodial parent gets custody. In that case the non-custodial parent must file a motion to terminate the child support order. The child support should be paid to whoever has custody of the child. If it's not the non-custodial parent then the child support order should be modified to reflect the party that should receive the child support payments. You have to pay for your child so you have to pay to the one who has custody while the other parent is in prison. If the state has custody you will pay the state.


Yes, it does not matter where the child lives, you still have to pay it. The child does not stop being yours just because he/she lives in another state.



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