Microsoft Access

Can duplicate field names be used in a table -in Microsoft Access?

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2013-03-26 21:57:04
2013-03-26 21:57:04

No. Each field has to have a unique name. If they don't then it is not possible to distinguish one field from another. If there is a situation where you might want names to be the same, then use ones that are similar, making adding a number to them, like AddressLine1 and AddressLine2 etc.

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The names are: Microsoft excel, Microsoft word, Microsoft duplicate


Here are the "Object Naming Rules," as provided by the Microsoft Access Help File: --------------------------------------… Guidelines for naming fields, controls, and objects Names of fields, controls, and objects in Microsoft Access: Can be up to 64 characters long. Can include any combination of letters, numbers, spaces, and special characters except a period (.), an exclamation point (!), an accent grave (`), and brackets ([ ]). Can't begin with leading spaces. Can't include control characters (ASCII values 0 through 31). Can't include a double quotation mark (") in table, view, or stored procedure names in a Microsoft Access project. Although you can include spaces in field, control, and object names, most examples in the Microsoft Access documentation show field and control names without spaces because spaces in names can produce naming conflicts in Visual Basic for Applications in some circumstances. When you name a field, control, or object, it's a good idea to make sure the name doesn't duplicate the name of a property or other element used by Microsoft Access; otherwise, your database can produce unexpected behavior in some circumstances. For example, if you refer to the value of a field called Name in a table NameInfo using the syntax NameInfo.Name, Microsoft Access displays the value of the table's Name property rather than the value of the Name field. Another way to avoid unexpected results is to always use the ! operator instead of the . (dot) operator to refer to the value of a field, control, or object. For example, the following identifier explicitly refers to the value of the Name field rather than the Name property: [NameInfo]![Name] --------------------------------------…


Yes, these would be valid field names in Microsoft Access. We would not use first name or last name as primary index fields, but phone number would be a valid primary index field.


Microsoft Access is the database solution for the Microsoft Office Suite. It is used primarily to organize data and manipulate it in order to find names, sort contacts, etc.


field may be discribed as a column of data. The field name is the name for all the data placed in that field. In access it defaults to filed 1, Field 2, Field 3 etc. You can then change this to read for example TITLE, FIRST_NAME, LAST_NAME


You can use them, but it is not a god idea. You should look for alternate names for the fields if you get a reserved word warning.


There have been several names given for Microsoft email, such as Star Nine and Quarterdeck. However, the most current name for Microsoft email as of July 2013 is Microsoft Exchange.


yes....a GUID (globally unique identifier), a 128-bit number that ensures that no two objects have duplicate names.


View products that this article applies to. Article ID : 197894 Last Review : November 16, 2004 Revision : 5.0 This article was previously published under Q197894For a Microsoft Access 97 version of this article, see 176201 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/176201/). On This Page SUMMARYSaving the Works Database FileImporting the Works Database into AccessThis article describes how to import a Works database file into a Microsoft Access 2000 database. This is a two-step process. First you must save the Works database file in a format compatible with Microsoft Access. Then you can import the Works database into Microsoft Access.Back to the top Save the Works database file in a format compatible with Microsoft Access. To do so, follow these steps: 1. Open the database in Works. 2. Make sure the field widths in Form view are large enough to display all the information in the field. 3. Check the format of each field that contains text to ensure that it is General or Text formatting. If the format of a Text field is set to a numeric format, such as Currency or Date, the field will be blank when you open the database in Access. 4. When you save in dBASE format (as you will do in step 8), field names will be truncated at 10 characters, so ensure the first 10 characters of each field name are unique. For example, two fields named "Address 1" and "Address 2" would be OK, but "Address Line 1" and "Address Line 2" would not be.NOTE: If the first 10 characters in two or more fields are the same, these field names will be imported into Access with a default field name, such as Field_1, Field_2, and so on. 5. On the File menu, click Save As. 6. Select a folder to which to save the database. To make the database easy to locate, select the Access folder. 7. Enter a new name, without an extension, in the File Name field.NOTE: When you import a dBASE file that does not follow the MS-DOS 8.3 file name convention (that is, an 8-character name followed by a period (.) and a 3-character extension), you may encounter problems when you try to import the dBASE file into Microsoft Access. Therefore, be sure to create a new file name that does not use more than 8 characters.For more information, see: 209685 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/209685/EN-US/) Could Not Find Object... Error When Importing dBASE, FoxPro, or Paradox File 8. In the Save File As Type list, select dBASE III or dBASE IV, and click Save.NOTE: If you receive the error message, "Some Field Text Was Truncated," return to step 2 and increase the field width. 9. Quit Works. NOTE: If Works does not add the .dbf extension, resave the file with this extension.Back to the top To import the database into Access, follow these steps: 1. Start Microsoft Access. 2. In the Microsoft Access dialog box, under "Create a new database using," click to select Blank Access Database, and then click OK. 3. Name the database, and then click Create. 4. In the Database window, under Objects, click Tables, and then click New. 5. In the New Table dialog box, select Import Table from the list, and then click OK. 6. In the Import dialog box, click the arrow in the Look In box, and select the folder that contains the dBASE file that you created in Microsoft Works. Click the arrow in the Files Of Type box, and select either dBASE III or dBASE IV, depending on the format you chose in step 8 of the "Saving the Works Database File" section earlier in this article. 7. Click the database that you want to use, and then click Import. You should receive a message that the file has been successfully imported. Click OK. Then close the Import dialog box.The Works file has been imported into Access. If you want to view the imported data, select the new table in the Database Window, and click Open. If you want to discard the Works file used to transfer your data into Microsoft Access, delete the file.For information about importing Works Spreadsheets into Microsoft Access, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 209726 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/209726/EN-US/) HOW TO: Import Spreadsheets from MS Works for Windows in Access 2000Back to the top ---- APPLIES TO • Microsoft Access 2000 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 2.0 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 2.0a • Microsoft Works 3.0 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 3.0a • Microsoft Works 3.0b • Microsoft Works 4.5 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 4.5a • Microsoft Works 4.0 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 4.0a Back to the top Keywords: kbimport kbhowtomaster kbinterop KB197894 View products that this article applies to. Article ID : 197894 Last Review : November 16, 2004 Revision : 5.0 This article was previously published under Q197894For a Microsoft Access 97 version of this article, see 176201 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/176201/). On This Page SUMMARYSaving the Works Database FileImporting the Works Database into AccessThis article describes how to import a Works database file into a Microsoft Access 2000 database. This is a two-step process. First you must save the Works database file in a format compatible with Microsoft Access. Then you can import the Works database into Microsoft Access.Back to the top Save the Works database file in a format compatible with Microsoft Access. To do so, follow these steps: 1. Open the database in Works. 2. Make sure the field widths in Form view are large enough to display all the information in the field. 3. Check the format of each field that contains text to ensure that it is General or Text formatting. If the format of a Text field is set to a numeric format, such as Currency or Date, the field will be blank when you open the database in Access. 4. When you save in dBASE format (as you will do in step 8), field names will be truncated at 10 characters, so ensure the first 10 characters of each field name are unique. For example, two fields named "Address 1" and "Address 2" would be OK, but "Address Line 1" and "Address Line 2" would not be.NOTE: If the first 10 characters in two or more fields are the same, these field names will be imported into Access with a default field name, such as Field_1, Field_2, and so on. 5. On the File menu, click Save As. 6. Select a folder to which to save the database. To make the database easy to locate, select the Access folder. 7. Enter a new name, without an extension, in the File Name field.NOTE: When you import a dBASE file that does not follow the MS-DOS 8.3 file name convention (that is, an 8-character name followed by a period (.) and a 3-character extension), you may encounter problems when you try to import the dBASE file into Microsoft Access. Therefore, be sure to create a new file name that does not use more than 8 characters.For more information, see: 209685 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/209685/EN-US/) Could Not Find Object... Error When Importing dBASE, FoxPro, or Paradox File 8. In the Save File As Type list, select dBASE III or dBASE IV, and click Save.NOTE: If you receive the error message, "Some Field Text Was Truncated," return to step 2 and increase the field width. 9. Quit Works. NOTE: If Works does not add the .dbf extension, resave the file with this extension.Back to the top To import the database into Access, follow these steps: 1. Start Microsoft Access. 2. In the Microsoft Access dialog box, under "Create a new database using," click to select Blank Access Database, and then click OK. 3. Name the database, and then click Create. 4. In the Database window, under Objects, click Tables, and then click New. 5. In the New Table dialog box, select Import Table from the list, and then click OK. 6. In the Import dialog box, click the arrow in the Look In box, and select the folder that contains the dBASE file that you created in Microsoft Works. Click the arrow in the Files Of Type box, and select either dBASE III or dBASE IV, depending on the format you chose in step 8 of the "Saving the Works Database File" section earlier in this article. 7. Click the database that you want to use, and then click Import. You should receive a message that the file has been successfully imported. Click OK. Then close the Import dialog box.The Works file has been imported into Access. If you want to view the imported data, select the new table in the Database Window, and click Open. If you want to discard the Works file used to transfer your data into Microsoft Access, delete the file.For information about importing Works Spreadsheets into Microsoft Access, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 209726 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/209726/EN-US/) HOW TO: Import Spreadsheets from MS Works for Windows in Access 2000Back to the top ---- APPLIES TO • Microsoft Access 2000 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 2.0 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 2.0a • Microsoft Works 3.0 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 3.0a • Microsoft Works 3.0b • Microsoft Works 4.5 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 4.5a • Microsoft Works 4.0 Standard Edition • Microsoft Works 4.0a Back to the top Keywords: kbimport kbhowtomaster kbinterop KB197894


The software that is used to check for duplicate domain names is either called Duplicate of Name or Domain Name. They search for files that have been duplicated and sent to a person.


names of people who contribute in the field of management


Field names can be a maximum of _____ characters in length


Student_id is the field in the tables


It is always better to have them as separate fields. It is very common to sort on last names and if there was a field which held the first name and last name in one field instead of two separate fields, it would not be possible to do that. If you take a phone book, the entries are always sorted by the last name. So in a properly designed database the first name and last name should always be separate fields.


Access is a computer program that is used to store, manage, view and publish information or data. One of the key advantages of Access over other Microsoft problems is its search capabilities. For example, after storing your friends' names, addresses, phone numbers, ages and birthdays in Access, you can search just for the ones living on Main Street and birthdays on August 14. Once you know the names of your August 14 friends you can then print them as a telephone book or email the list to each of them. Another advantage of Access is that it can send your data to Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and to MapPoint to create maps showing where all of your friends live or work. Unlike other Microsoft programs, Access requires that you learn a few things about computer programming. Out of the box, you cannot enter your information like you can with Word, Excel or PowerPoint. A great way to get started with Access is to download a sample database from the Microsoft website. The Northwind database does a lot but some of the simple Access templates may be where to start. Have fun!


Prior to releasing it's products, Microsoft chooses to name them arbitrary names and does not decide on an official name until the product is made publicly available. Some of these names include: Snowball, Detroit, Millennium, Jupiter, and Juneau.


can table and field names be up to 64 characters in length?


Say you have two fields - Hours, for the number of hours worked and Rate, for the rate per hour and you want to add a calculated field called Charge to a query so that you could calculate how much to charge for a particular job. The following expression would name the field and also calculate the fee to be charged. Charge: IIf([Hours]>0,[Hours]*[Rate],0) Note that the calculated field name is followed by a colon and that the names of existing fields are enclosed in square brackets.


NFL, Facebook, Netfix, and Microsoft



They are both official names of products so they should be written that way.


pictures- jpeg, jpg, gif(animation file), avi(movie/video file)text files(I'm not so sure on these) - txt(for notepad), docx(for Microsoft word),File names that I don't know(someone who does know these, please switch this phrase with the file name):PowerPoint filesMicrosoft accessMicrosoft excelPhotostory


Named access lists can be identified by alphanumeric names while standard access lists cannot


Because there are so many Microsoft programs, I'm afraid you need to be a litltle more specific. Sorry!


Joan Schneider has written: 'Field names of four Bedfordshire parishes' -- subject(s): Field names



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