Can father get custody if mother is unfit?

Yes. The biological father would be the next logical choice unless he has had problems in the past and has been declared an unfit parent himself. He can petition for sole custody and must provide compelling evidence to the court to prove the mother is unfit. The court will appoint a guardian ad litem to investigate and report back to the court. The judge will make a decision that is in the best interest of the child.

The factors used to determine that a parent is unfit are generally governed by state laws with child endangerment being the determining factor. The following include some of the reasons a parent may be declared unfit:

  • physical, emotional and sexual abuse
  • excessive discipline
  • failure to protect the child from abuse by others
  • failure to report abuse of the child
  • neglect- failure to provide food, clothing, proper hygiene, necessary medical treatment, schooling
  • failure to provide proper medical care
  • failure to provide day to day parental care
  • serious illness or disability
  • mental illness
  • substance abuse or addiction
  • alcoholism
  • criminal activity and/or associations
  • incarceration
  • conduct or conditions that are seriously detrimental to the child
  • abandonment
  • child endangerment
  • leaving the child unattended or in the care and supervision of a child or otherwise incompetent person
  • a failure to provide adequate supervision
  • unsafe living conditions
  • a medical condition that makes it impossible for the parent to adequately care for the child
Yes. The biological father would be the next logical choice unless he has had problems in the past and has been declared an unfit parent himself. He can petition for sole custody and must provide compelling evidence to the court to prove the mother is unfit. The court will appoint a guardian ad litem to investigate and report back to the court. The judge will make a decision that is in the best interest of the child.

The factors used to determine that a parent is unfit are generally governed by state laws with child endangerment being the determining factor. The following include some of the reasons a parent may be declared unfit:

  • physical, emotional and sexual abuse
  • excessive discipline
  • failure to protect the child from abuse by others
  • failure to report abuse of the child
  • neglect- failure to provide food, clothing, proper hygiene, necessary medical treatment, schooling
  • failure to provide proper medical care
  • failure to provide day to day parental care
  • serious illness or disability
  • mental illness
  • substance abuse or addiction
  • alcoholism
  • criminal activity and/or associations
  • incarceration
  • conduct or conditions that are seriously detrimental to the child
  • abandonment
  • child endangerment
  • leaving the child unattended or in the care and supervision of a child or otherwise incompetent person
  • a failure to provide adequate supervision
  • unsafe living conditions
  • a medical condition that makes it impossible for the parent to adequately care for the child
Yes. The biological father would be the next logical choice unless he has had problems in the past and has been declared an unfit parent himself. He can petition for sole custody and must provide compelling evidence to the court to prove the mother is unfit. The court will appoint a guardian ad litem to investigate and report back to the court. The judge will make a decision that is in the best interest of the child.

The factors used to determine that a parent is unfit are generally governed by state laws with child endangerment being the determining factor. The following include some of the reasons a parent may be declared unfit:

  • physical, emotional and sexual abuse
  • excessive discipline
  • failure to protect the child from abuse by others
  • failure to report abuse of the child
  • neglect- failure to provide food, clothing, proper hygiene, necessary medical treatment, schooling
  • failure to provide proper medical care
  • failure to provide day to day parental care
  • serious illness or disability
  • mental illness
  • substance abuse or addiction
  • alcoholism
  • criminal activity and/or associations
  • incarceration
  • conduct or conditions that are seriously detrimental to the child
  • abandonment
  • child endangerment
  • leaving the child unattended or in the care and supervision of a child or otherwise incompetent person
  • a failure to provide adequate supervision
  • unsafe living conditions
  • a medical condition that makes it impossible for the parent to adequately care for the child


Yes. The biological father would be the next logical choice unless he has had problems in the past and has been declared an unfit parent himself. He can petition for sole custody and must provide compelling evidence to the court to prove the mother is unfit. The court will appoint a guardian ad litem to investigate and report back to the court. The judge will make a decision that is in the best interest of the child.

The factors used to determine that a parent is unfit are generally governed by state laws with child endangerment being the determining factor. The following include some of the reasons a parent may be declared unfit:

  • physical, emotional and sexual abuse
  • excessive discipline
  • failure to protect the child from abuse by others
  • failure to report abuse of the child
  • neglect- failure to provide food, clothing, proper hygiene, necessary medical treatment, schooling
  • failure to provide proper medical care
  • failure to provide day to day parental care
  • serious illness or disability
  • mental illness
  • substance abuse or addiction
  • alcoholism
  • criminal activity and/or associations
  • incarceration
  • conduct or conditions that are seriously detrimental to the child
  • abandonment
  • child endangerment
  • leaving the child unattended or in the care and supervision of a child or otherwise incompetent person
  • a failure to provide adequate supervision
  • unsafe living conditions
  • a medical condition that makes it impossible for the parent to adequately care for the child


Yes. The biological father would be the next logical choice unless he has had problems in the past and has been declared an unfit parent himself. He can petition for sole custody and must provide compelling evidence to the court to prove the mother is unfit. The court will appoint a guardian ad litem to investigate and report back to the court. The judge will make a decision that is in the best interest of the child.

The factors used to determine that a parent is unfit are generally governed by state laws with child endangerment being the determining factor. The following include some of the reasons a parent may be declared unfit:

  • physical, emotional and sexual abuse
  • excessive discipline
  • failure to protect the child from abuse by others
  • failure to report abuse of the child
  • neglect- failure to provide food, clothing, proper hygiene, necessary medical treatment, schooling
  • failure to provide proper medical care
  • failure to provide day to day parental care
  • serious illness or disability
  • mental illness
  • substance abuse or addiction
  • alcoholism
  • criminal activity and/or associations
  • incarceration
  • conduct or conditions that are seriously detrimental to the child
  • abandonment
  • child endangerment
  • leaving the child unattended or in the care and supervision of a child or otherwise incompetent person
  • a failure to provide adequate supervision
  • unsafe living conditions
  • a medical condition that makes it impossible for the parent to adequately care for the child


Yes. The biological father would be the next logical choice unless he has had problems in the past and has been declared an unfit parent himself. He can petition for sole custody and must provide compelling evidence to the court to prove the mother is unfit. The court will appoint a guardian ad litem to investigate and report back to the court. The judge will make a decision that is in the best interest of the child.

The factors used to determine that a parent is unfit are generally governed by state laws with child endangerment being the determining factor. The following include some of the reasons a parent may be declared unfit:

  • physical, emotional and sexual abuse
  • excessive discipline
  • failure to protect the child from abuse by others
  • failure to report abuse of the child
  • neglect- failure to provide food, clothing, proper hygiene, necessary medical treatment, schooling
  • failure to provide proper medical care
  • failure to provide day to day parental care
  • serious illness or disability
  • mental illness
  • substance abuse or addiction
  • alcoholism
  • criminal activity and/or associations
  • incarceration
  • conduct or conditions that are seriously detrimental to the child
  • abandonment
  • child endangerment
  • leaving the child unattended or in the care and supervision of a child or otherwise incompetent person
  • a failure to provide adequate supervision
  • unsafe living conditions
  • a medical condition that makes it impossible for the parent to adequately care for the child
Yes. The biological father would be the next logical choice unless he has had problems in the past and has been declared an unfit parent himself. He can petition for sole custody and must provide compelling evidence to the court to prove the mother is unfit. The court will appoint a guardian ad litem to investigate and report back to the court. The judge will make a decision that is in the best interest of the child.

The factors used to determine that a parent is unfit are generally governed by state laws with child endangerment being the determining factor. The following include some of the reasons a parent may be declared unfit:

  • physical, emotional and sexual abuse
  • excessive discipline
  • failure to protect the child from abuse by others
  • failure to report abuse of the child
  • neglect- failure to provide food, clothing, proper hygiene, necessary medical treatment, schooling
  • failure to provide proper medical care
  • failure to provide day to day parental care
  • serious illness or disability
  • mental illness
  • substance abuse or addiction
  • alcoholism
  • criminal activity and/or associations
  • incarceration
  • conduct or conditions that are seriously detrimental to the child
  • abandonment
  • child endangerment
  • leaving the child unattended or in the care and supervision of a child or otherwise incompetent person
  • a failure to provide adequate supervision
  • unsafe living conditions
  • a medical condition that makes it impossible for the parent to adequately care for the child
Yes. The biological father would be the next logical choice unless he has had problems in the past and has been declared an unfit parent himself. He can petition for sole custody and must provide compelling evidence to the court to prove the mother is unfit. The court will appoint a guardian ad litem to investigate and report back to the court. The judge will make a decision that is in the best interest of the child.

The factors used to determine that a parent is unfit are generally governed by state laws with child endangerment being the determining factor. The following include some of the reasons a parent may be declared unfit:

  • physical, emotional and sexual abuse
  • excessive discipline
  • failure to protect the child from abuse by others
  • failure to report abuse of the child
  • neglect- failure to provide food, clothing, proper hygiene, necessary medical treatment, schooling
  • failure to provide proper medical care
  • failure to provide day to day parental care
  • serious illness or disability
  • mental illness
  • substance abuse or addiction
  • alcoholism
  • criminal activity and/or associations
  • incarceration
  • conduct or conditions that are seriously detrimental to the child
  • abandonment
  • child endangerment
  • leaving the child unattended or in the care and supervision of a child or otherwise incompetent person
  • a failure to provide adequate supervision
  • unsafe living conditions
  • a medical condition that makes it impossible for the parent to adequately care for the child