Debt Collection
Debt Responsibility
Medical Billing and Coding

Can medical bills of a deceased parent get in the way of the estate heir?

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2012-02-25 17:04:20
2012-02-25 17:04:20

Yes, they will get in the way. Debts are the responsibility of the estate. Before anything in the estate can be distributed, the debts have to be cleared.

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Related Questions


In Georgia the estate is responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.


For Pennsylvania the estate has the responsibility to settle the medical bills, not the children. Once that is done, the remainder can be distributed.


Probably not. The estate may be used to pay bills but the children should have no personal liabilities.


In Oregon the estate will be responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.


In Indiana the estate will be responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.


In California the estate will be responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.


Medical bills are the responsibility of the estate. If the estate cannot do so, they distribute as best they can. If the court approves the distribution, the debts are ended.


In Arizona the estate is responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed any remainder distributed.


In Ohio the estate will be responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.


No, the executor of the estate will be responsible. If there is no estate then the bills will not be paid.


Children are not responsible for the debts of their parents. The estate must settle the debts. The exception would be if a child signed any paperwork gaurenteeing the medical costs.


In Arizona the estate is responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed any remainder distributed. So the wife cannot inherit anything until the bills are resolved.


In Montana the estate will be responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.


The estate is responsible. This may mean the spouse will get much less from the estate.


The estate is responsible. If there isn't one, an estate should be opened.


The estate is responsible for all the bills of the deceased. The spouse will be required to pay them from the estate funds.


In Virginia, as in all states, the estate is responsible for all the debts of the deceased. That means before the estate can be settled, all medical bills have to be cleared. If there is not enough in the estate to cover them, the husband may not get anything.


In Oklahoma the estate will be responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed.


Indirectly, the estate is responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed and any remainder distributed to the spouse.


It is not the parents, but the estate that is responsible for any remaining debts. That will include medical bills. If there is not enough in the estate to cover them, someone will not get paid.


Her estate has to pay the bills. And since he will be inheriting the estate, he will be paying the bills either directly or indirectly.


Technically the estate is responsible for all the debts of the deceased. The spouse, through the estate, has to pay off the debts.


No, the estate is responsible for the medical bills of the deceased. Only after they are resolved can the estate be closed any remainder distributed.


Yes, it will be the responsibility of the estate. No will is necessary to open an estate. North Carolina law will designate the beneficiaries, if the estate value exceeds the debts.


Bills are paid from the estate of the deceased.



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