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Answered 2012-05-29 00:47:13

No, momentum can not have a negative velocity.

Velocity is the rate of motion of a body from one position to another position in a particular direction. Bodies traveling in opposite directions may appear to have a negative velocity in relationship to each other but any amount of velocity is positive.

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Momentum is mass x velocity; velocity has a direction, therefore momentum has a direction.Momentum is mass x velocity; velocity has a direction, therefore momentum has a direction.Momentum is mass x velocity; velocity has a direction, therefore momentum has a direction.Momentum is mass x velocity; velocity has a direction, therefore momentum has a direction.


Quite simply, this means that momentum is a vector quantity; the direction is relevant. This is useful, for example, for calculations involving the conservation of momentum. Actually momentum is the product of velocity and mass, and velocity is also a vector quantity - thus, in this example, one object will have a positive velocity (more precisely: a positive component of the velocity along the x-axis, for example), the other, negative. Multiplying this velocity by the mass will also give a quantity which may be positive or negative (or rather, have positive or negative components).


Momentum is the product of velocity and mass.Momentum is the product of velocity and mass.Momentum is the product of velocity and mass.Momentum is the product of velocity and mass.


Momentum and velocity are directly proportional. Momentum = mass x velocity


When something increases in velocity, its momentum would increase because momentum is equal to its mass * velocity. This means that the momentum and velocity are proportional, so twice the velocity is twice the momentum, and so on.


Momentum is mass multiplied by velocity - so it is proportional to the velocity. If the velocity triples then so does the momentum


if velocity increases, so does momentum. and vice versa momentum = mass x velocity increasing mass or velocity or both will increase momentum


if velocity increases, so does momentum. and vice versa momentum = mass x velocity increasing mass or velocity or both will increase momentum


Momentum = (mass) times (velocity)mass = (Momentum) divided by (velocity)


In physics, momentum = mass x velocityhigher the mass or higher the velocity, higher is the momentum. Note, momentum is a vector quantity i.e it has both magnitude and direction. For instance, when two bodies A of velocity 3m/s and B of velocity 6m/s both of equal masses collide, A moves in the direction of B. Mathematically, the momentum of A is given a negative sign(-) meaning that the momentum of A is in the direction of B


no as momentum=mass x velocity if velocity = 0 then momentum=0


Momentum before = momentum after. Since there was no movement before, momentum before = 0 If you think of the bullet as forward/positive momentum and the gun as backward/negative momentum then the momentum of the bullet plus the momentum of the gun =0 and therefore the momentum of the bullet = the momentum if the gun. momentum = mass x velocity P=m/v 20gx150m/s = 2000g (2kg) x velocity 3000 = 2000v 3000 / 2000 = v v = 1.5m/s


The momentum depends both on the velocity, and on the mass.The momentum depends both on the velocity, and on the mass.The momentum depends both on the velocity, and on the mass.The momentum depends both on the velocity, and on the mass.


Momentum is the product of velocity and mass; and since velocity is the only vector in this product, momentum has the same direction as the velocity.


Momentum = (mass) x (velocity)Divide each side of the equation by (velocity) :(mass) = Momentum/(velocity)


Momentum = mass x velocity. If you divide out the velocity you get mass.


The momentum of a body is defined as the product of is mas and velocity. Momentum = Mass x Velocity. If a body is at rest then obviously its velocity is zero. Therefore, its momentum also becomes zero.


Momentum is proportional to velocity. More precisely:momentum = velocity x mass


Momentum does not affect an object's velocity.


Momentum is the product of mass and velocity.



Momentum is directly proportional to the velocity. Thrice the velocity means thrice the momentum.


Momentum is the product of mass times velocity. With less velocity, there will be less momentum. (An object's mass will usually not change.)


Momentum is defined as a vector quantity; this means that the direction matters. Only if it is defined as a vector quantity do you have something called "conservation of momentum", which makes it very interesting for physics.


No, momentum is the product of mass and velocity, so if the velocity is zero, so is the momentum.



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