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Answered 2012-05-07 21:59:25

The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.

The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.

The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.

The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.

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Answered 2012-05-07 21:59:25

The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.

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No. They would need to request a court order. A non-custodial parent has no right to force anything on the custodial parent.No. They would need to request a court order. A non-custodial parent has no right to force anything on the custodial parent.No. They would need to request a court order. A non-custodial parent has no right to force anything on the custodial parent.No. They would need to request a court order. A non-custodial parent has no right to force anything on the custodial parent.


the custodial parent is the parent the child lives with the non custodial parent is the parent the child does NOT live with the non custodial parent assuming he / she knows he is a parent... is usually the patitioning parent. if he /she chooses not to seek visitation rights the court cannot force him/ her to see the child.... but they can enforce child support. research the laws for your state.


No, the court can bar a custodial parent from taking the child out of state away from the non-custodial parent, but cannot force the custodial parent to relocate to be closer to the NCP after they move.


Courts make decisions for the best interest of the child. If a child does not want to be in a certain environment the court will not force that child into it.


If the non-custodial parent is not barred from seeing the child, it would be VERY strange if the custody order(s) did not address visitation. If the custodial parent is denying the non-custodial parent court allowed access, then the custodial parent is in contempt of the court's order. My suggestion would be for the non-custodial parent to return to the court with this information - DO NOT attempt to 'force' the situation as it could wind up back-firing on you.


Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.


No, the court can force the non custodial parent to financially support his or her minor children but it cannot force a parent to be involved in the child's life.


The courts cannot force an absent parent to visit the child[ren].


Yes. If there is a court ordered set vistation schedule the non custodial parent can request the court to "force" the custodial parent and the minor child into adhering to the terms of the order. The custodial parent can contest the forced visitation for the minor child if there is a valid reason. Valid reasons would be, the child is being adversely affected emotionally, is being physically abused, is being placed in unsuitable or unsafe situations and so forth.


In some cases, visitation would be dangerous to the child. Also, as a matter of public policy there seems to be little point to the government attempting to force a parent into a relationship.


Debatable and dependent on the wording of the custody order as regards medical procedures, which these are considered.


AnswerChild support does not depend on visitation. They are addressed in separate orders and the orders remain in effect until they are modified by the court. If the child has a good reason to end visits with the non-custodial parent the custodial should file a motion with the court to modify the visitation order. The child should be old enough to offer testimony to the judge if he/she wishes. The parent and child should be prepared to offer specific evidence for curtailing the visits. Perhaps the non-custodial parent and child could instead meet for dinner each week away from the negative environment. Provide the court with enough evidence to make a fair determination.This matter should be addressed as soon as possible through the court system before the non-custodial parent has the time to file a motion for contempt against the custodial parent. That would change the nature of the dispute.File a motion for modification ASAP.


No. The court cannot make a parent spend time with their children. Visitation orders are only enforced on the custodial parent. If the non-custodial parent doesn't follow the visitation order the courts cannot force them to.


Courts can write orders that create and define the conditions of visitation, such as frequency, duration, holidays, etc. But, courts cannot force the non-custodial parent to participate in visitation or to be a parent. The custodial parent should keep track of dates and the facts that occurred on dates when the non-custodial parent failed to show up for visitation. That information will be useful if you choose to ask the court to modify the visitation order. NOTE: Child support and visitation are two separate issues. Child Support must be paid even if the non-custodial parent never takes responsibility for parenting.


No. There is no law that says a parent must have contact with children. And that is justly so. It would seem a parent who was forced to have visitation would not be able to meet the emotional needs of the children.


Such issues are not the jurisdiction of the state's Attorney General. The custodial parent will need to file suit in the appropriate court in the city or county where they reside against the non custodial parent.


Yes. The visitation order remains in effect until it has been modified by the court. Generally, a child cannot make the decision to end visitations until the age of eighteen. The parents should try to remedy the situation that makes the child want to stop the visits. If there is a good reason to stop the visits the custodial parent must return to court and request a modification. Until the visitation order is modified the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt of a court order against the custodial parent.


No. There is no way to force visitations on an unwilling, absent parent.No. There is no way to force visitations on an unwilling, absent parent.No. There is no way to force visitations on an unwilling, absent parent.No. There is no way to force visitations on an unwilling, absent parent.


* If the custodial parent agreed to let the child stay for a certain time and this is in writing, that parent should not be able to force the child's return home without a good reason. * If the permission was just word-of-mouth, it is shaky ground; the courts would likely favour the custodial parent and require the child to return. * If the child petitions the court themselves, it is not likely that they will be listened to, especially if the current custodial parent fights that choice. * You may be able to argue that the child obviously has reasons for wanting to now live with the other parent - knowing those reasons would help a lot - and the current custodial is fighting to repress their freedom of choice. * If you are lucky enough to find a good lawyer and get a compassionate judge, they may find in favour of changing the custody to the other parent, or at least giving them more visitation.


It depends on the state, but most states have a certain age set where the child can decide which parent they want to live with. Usually, it is around 13 or 14, but it can be different. If your child hasn't reached that set age, then they must continue to live with the custodial parent.


Child support is not based upon the reluctance of a parent(s) to refuse to be gainfully employed, the non custodial obligated parent is required to pay support for the child regardless of the circumstances . In joint custody one parent is the primary custodian, meaning the one with whom the child resides the majority of time (such as school terms). The court cannot force the primary custodial parent to seek employment simply because the obligated parent wishes to be relieved of his or her financial responsibility to the child.


In the legal sense, no. The law cannot force a parent to take a part in a child's life. The court only has jurisdiction in custodial and support matters.


I have consulted an attorney in regards to this issue in Texas, and have been told that while the Courts no longer use the age of 12 as a guideline. The Courts have determined that if there is a visitation schedule in place the non-custodial parent has the right to visits. However, the attoney told me that for children who are 12 and older, if they refuse to go to a visit, or refuse to see the parent when they came to pick them up, the custodial Parent is not breaking any law as long as the child was made available for the visit. If the child refuses to go and is a teenager, the Courts are not going to force them, and the custodial parent is not in violation or contempt. He also advised that you get it on videotape and/or have witnesses to attest to the fact that you made the children available for the visit, but the child refused.


You have to file a motion for contempt in the court that issued the visitation order to have a judge review the situation and modify the visitation order if appropriate. The court cannot force a parent to visit with their child. However, if the non-custodial parent is trying to pick the child up during non-visitation hours or bringing the child back late, the court will impose further orders and likely modify the visitation order if the problem persists. If the child is prepared for visits and the parent fails to show up that is also extremely stressful for both child and custodial parent. If the parent continues to violate the order they can eventually lose their visitation rights.


No one can "force" you to visit your child, although refusing visitation would likely have negative consequences like the loss of visitation rights in the future and the loss of parental rights as far as decision-making (also the loss of the love of your child!!!). Refusing visitation will not reduce or eliminate your child support obligations; in fact, the custodial parent would have a much stronger case if they requested an increase in support and could show the judge that you are not contributing in other ways to the child's well-being.



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