Transmissions and Drivetrains
Honda Civic LX
Winston Churchill

Can parking in gear cause long-term damage or wear to the clutch on a manual transmission?

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2005-10-08 15:55:36
2005-10-08 15:55:36

Not that I ever heard of. If fact, that is the recommended method of parking your vehicle, in gear, with emergency brake on. Now if you were to park the car for several years without moving it, the parts would probably rust together, but the clutch would still be good.

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