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Answered 2012-10-01 21:22:19

No. You can't give up your parental rights if your paternity hasn't been legally established.

No. You can't give up your parental rights if your paternity hasn't been legally established.

No. You can't give up your parental rights if your paternity hasn't been legally established.

No. You can't give up your parental rights if your paternity hasn't been legally established.

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Answered 2012-10-01 21:22:19

No. You can't give up your parental rights if your paternity hasn't been legally established.

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No. The court demand paternity to be established before they grant child support.


No, paternity have to be established first. Otherwise a man can be forced to pay for a child that is not his. It's easily done by a DNA test.


That someone should have confirmed paternity at the time the child support was ordered.That someone should have confirmed paternity at the time the child support was ordered.That someone should have confirmed paternity at the time the child support was ordered.That someone should have confirmed paternity at the time the child support was ordered.


Absolutely nothing. You have no control whatsoever over naming the child. You have no parental rights unless you establish your paternity in court. Once established legally as the child's father you can request a visitation schedule and the mother can obtain a child support order. The child's name is the mother's choice.Absolutely nothing. You have no control whatsoever over naming the child. You have no parental rights unless you establish your paternity in court. Once established legally as the child's father you can request a visitation schedule and the mother can obtain a child support order. The child's name is the mother's choice.Absolutely nothing. You have no control whatsoever over naming the child. You have no parental rights unless you establish your paternity in court. Once established legally as the child's father you can request a visitation schedule and the mother can obtain a child support order. The child's name is the mother's choice.Absolutely nothing. You have no control whatsoever over naming the child. You have no parental rights unless you establish your paternity in court. Once established legally as the child's father you can request a visitation schedule and the mother can obtain a child support order. The child's name is the mother's choice.


Child support does not begin until the child is born and paternity is established. In Kansas, support has to begin during the pregnancy.


The law presumes your husband to be the father, unless/until paternity is established by an acknowledgment of paternity, genetic testing or testimony in open court.


A person from Wyoming is called a Wyomingite.


Courts do not grant parental rights, custody and restraining orders without evidence. They do not grant custody to a man who only "says" he's the father or to someone who is "presumed" to be the father. They establish paternity first. You should contact an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.Courts do not grant parental rights, custody and restraining orders without evidence. They do not grant custody to a man who only "says" he's the father or to someone who is "presumed" to be the father. They establish paternity first. You should contact an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.Courts do not grant parental rights, custody and restraining orders without evidence. They do not grant custody to a man who only "says" he's the father or to someone who is "presumed" to be the father. They establish paternity first. You should contact an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.Courts do not grant parental rights, custody and restraining orders without evidence. They do not grant custody to a man who only "says" he's the father or to someone who is "presumed" to be the father. They establish paternity first. You should contact an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.



If you're in the U.S., you can give up your parental rights, but that won't excuse you from financial responsibility. You will still be ordered to pay child support. Child support is not payment for rights to your child. It's court enforcement of parental responsibility. If paternity or maternity has been established, you'll be ordered to pay child support unless you find someone else to legally adopt the child. So, if you're the father and you surrender parental rights and the mother of the child's new husband or boyfriend legally adopts the child, then you could escape child support payments. But that's the only way.


Paternity must be established before an order for support is entered. This is done by: genetic testing; presumption, where the parties were married when the child was born/conceived; acknowledgment of paternity either in writing or in open court; default, where the alleged father fails to cooperate in the process.


A "father" is someone for whom paternity has been established. That done, the father would have the right to pay support and petition for visitation.


If you were not married when the child arrived the legal custody lies with the mother. The father have to prove paternity in court before he can get his parental rights.


Yes, as long as the person is at least 16 they can marry with parental consent. Anyone under sixteen must have parental consent and the approval of the court.


someone... read a book on Wyoming or something.


From what I was told by the "Courts", in order for an established parent to terminate their rights, there has to be someone on the other end to pick up where they left off, like an adoption.


There is no insurance that would cover paternity testing (because it is not a medical need). Someone can fund their own test and it runs about $1000.


It depends where you go. If you talk to someone in charge or someone who has gotten one, you should get an approximate amount.



A man can be ordered by the court to take a DNA paternity test. The court is the only entity that can force someone to take a test.


You'll have to find someone to take over the fiancial responsibility. Assuming that paternity has been established for the children, a judge will allow a parent to voluntarily relinquish parental rights for the expressed purpose of being relieved of the financial obligation. In some cases the father may have the option of appealing a support order if he requests that confirmation of paternity be establised. However, a support order that is in affect will continue to be so until such time a court rules otherwise. Generally, voluntary relinquishment of parental rights is only granted when the child or children are eligible to be adopted by a new spouse or both parents have agreed to the action for the purpose of adoption.


No, but, and this is a big BUT, if you are a couple the Child Protective Service could have a say in it since the age of consent is 17 in Wyoming. No sex allowed and if someone reports the older individual for statutory rape it will be very difficult for him to get out of that one. And the parents who allowed the minor to move in can also get into trouble with the law since they allowed it to happen.


Without parental permission it is 18.


Sometimes but is not foolproof of course. A paternity test is cheap & accurate if needed.


When the child is born the father can sign the birth certificate and take a DNA test and prove his paternity in court so he gets his parental rights and can petition for custody, visitation and pay child support.



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