answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2010-11-24 00:06:42

No. The non-custodial parent needs to have the visitation rights enforced by the court if necessary.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


Unless visitation rights for the non-custodial parent were allowed in the divorce paperwork, the custodial parent is completely within their rights to deny the non-custodial parent visitation....however, the non-custodial parent may sue for visitation rights.


If the court has awarded you visitation rights, then you have those rights legally and they cannot be denied by the custodial parent.


The custodial parent cannot deny visitation of the non-custodial parent if there is a court order in place. Only the court can rescind visitation privileges or terminate parental rights. If there is no court ordered visitation the custodial parent has the right to use their discretion. If however, the non-custodial parent decides to file for visitation rights; the refusal for visitation will not be looked upon favorably by the court unless there are acceptable reasons for it having been done.



Yes. The non-custodial parent must return to court and request a visitation schedule.Yes. The non-custodial parent must return to court and request a visitation schedule.Yes. The non-custodial parent must return to court and request a visitation schedule.Yes. The non-custodial parent must return to court and request a visitation schedule.



Unless there is a court order which prevents the non-custodial parent from having access to the child, then you should not deny the visitation unless you have absolute proof that allowing visitation is a danger to your child. It's best to speak to a lawyer and find out about modifying any current custodial order that may already be in place if necessary.


Yes they can. The court can deny all visitation if the situation needs it.


Whether or not a parent is paying child support is irrelevant when the issue is visitation rights. If there is a court order for visitation the primary custodial parent must allow it or be found in contempt of court. If there is not a court order in place the custodial parent can make the decision to when, where or if visitation is allowed. Visitation guidelines are usually established during the custodial proceedings.


No. The child is now eighteen and he or she can make their own decision although that may cause trouble if the child still lives with the "custodial" parent.


If there is no court mandated agreement that ensures the noncustodial parent visitation rights, then yes they can.


If you're in the US, the age is 18. Until then, if the parent has court-ordered visitation, it has to be followed. If there is a legitimate reason the child does not want to visit the parent, the custodial parent can petition the court to revise the visitation order. Be aware the court will not deny a parent the right to visitation without a very good reason.


18. Until then, if the parent has court-ordered visitation, it has to be followed. If there is a legitimate reason the child does not want to visit the parent, the custodial parent can petition the court to revise the visitation order. Be aware the court will not deny a parent the right to visitation without a very goodreason.


Legally the custodial parent can deny visitation outside the court ordered terms. But if custodial issues come before the court again the incident might not look favorable for the custodial parent. To refuse an activity such as noted in the question would appear to be mean spirited unless the request for visitation interferred with the child's/children's school, medical care, extracurricular activity or something similar.


If the parent has court-ordered visitation, yes. If there is a legitimate reason the child does not want to visit the parent, the custodial parent can petition the court to revise the visitation order. Be aware the court will not deny a parent the right to visitation without a very good reason, nor will they look kindly on a custodial parent who request it without a very good reason.


Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent can file a suit for child support but cannot deny the non custodial parent custodial or vistation rights is said parent wants those rights. That being said, the non custodial parent can file for custody or visitation regardless of whether the child support issue is addressed or not. Such matters are decided by the court if the parents cannot find an equitable solution.


If you're in the US, the age is 18. Until then, if the parent has court-ordered visitation, it has to be followed. If there is a legitimate reason the child does not want to visit the parent, the custodial parent can petition the court to revise the visitation order. Be aware the court will not deny a parent the right to visitation without a very good reason.


If the parent has court-ordered visitation, yes. If there is a legitimate reason the child does not want to visit the parent, the custodial parent can petition the court to revise the visitation order. Be aware the court will not deny a parent the right to visitation without a very good reason, nor will they look kindly on a custodial parent who request it without a very good reason.


Assuming the parent has court-ordered visitation, no she can't. If there is a legitimate reason the child does not want to visit the parent, the custodial parent can petition the court to revise the visitation order. Be aware the court will not deny a parent the right to visitation without a very good reason, nor will they look kindly on a custodial parent who request it without a very good reason.


(in the US) Yes, that would be justifiable grounds for denying the non-custodial their visitation, even if the visitation was court ordered. HOWEVER - if you know the whereabouts of the wanted non-custodial you cannot keep this information a secret from law enforcement in order to use it as continual justification to deny the visitation. To do so places you in the position of aiding and abetting the fugitive.


No. You can petition the court to modify the visitation order because of those things, but until the court does so, you do not have any right to deny visitation.


Spouse? Don't you mean your ex? She can not deny visitation unless the child would be in danger of some kind. If the visitation order needs to be changed it can only be done in court and she would have to have good reasons why she denied it. Not liking the ex's new girlfrind is not a reason to deny visitation. This will happen to her too and it's called moving on with life. Ex:) If the dad has visitation rights and a new girlfriend and the custodial parent, the mother, does not approve of the child meeting the new girlfriend, she has no right to dictate to the father who the child sees during visitation. That is entirely up to the father. Unless the girlfriend is unfit to be around the child. That is something the mother would have to prove in court if she wants to prevent them from meeting. This of course also works the other way. The non-custodial parent can not dictate to the custodial parent who the child meets when with her.


YOU cannot deny any custody or visitation. Only the court can make an enforceable decision regarding these matters. State laws vary. If physical abuse is the case, the custodial parent will need a record of the abuse and should call the police, take pictures to record the effects, and try to have dis-interested witnesses present at the time of any contact between the parents. If there is no abuse to the children, or no abuse in the presence of the children, it is unlikely to make any change in the court decision for joint custody. It may compel the court to make some order for supervised exchange of the children for visitation. Only the court can make any decision, especially regarding custody. If the non-custodial parent is abusive to the children it may be very good grounds for a sole custody arrangement. It may also encourage the court to provide for supervised visitation. Visitation is a different issue than custody. Visitation is the means for the non-custodial parent to have a relationship with the children and build that relationship. A court generally regards this as semi-sacred. A custodial parent should NOT deny visitation. If it is necessary to curtail visitation for the real safety of the children, the custodial parent should immediately file a request for a change of visitation. Otherwise, a court may frown on a parent who denies visitation. In some states, continual denial of visitation can be grounds for a change of custody.


I'm assuming that you have a teen who has a child and you wish to deny the father access. This is no a choice the grandparent legally has.


The child should not be placed in the middle of such an adversarial situation. The father should visit the family court as soon as possible and file a motion for contempt of a court order. If the custodial parent continues to deny visitation they could lose custody.If the father does not have a court order for visitation then he should petition the family court for a visitation schedule.The child should not be placed in the middle of such an adversarial situation. The father should visit the family court as soon as possible and file a motion for contempt of a court order. If the custodial parent continues to deny visitation they could lose custody.If the father does not have a court order for visitation then he should petition the family court for a visitation schedule.The child should not be placed in the middle of such an adversarial situation. The father should visit the family court as soon as possible and file a motion for contempt of a court order. If the custodial parent continues to deny visitation they could lose custody.If the father does not have a court order for visitation then he should petition the family court for a visitation schedule.The child should not be placed in the middle of such an adversarial situation. The father should visit the family court as soon as possible and file a motion for contempt of a court order. If the custodial parent continues to deny visitation they could lose custody.If the father does not have a court order for visitation then he should petition the family court for a visitation schedule.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.