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Answered 2013-12-06 20:37:55

Yes, it can. A typical example if when you through something up; after a while it will reverse its direction and fall back down again. Acceleration is downward all the time.

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Can the velocity of object reverse direction when its acceleration is constant?

yes, if the acceleration is in the opposite direction of the velocity.


Can an object with constant acceleration reverse its direction of travel can it reverse its direction twice?

Sure. Anything you toss with your hand has constant acceleration after you toss it ... the acceleration of gravity, directed downward. If you toss it upward, it starts out with upward velocity, which reverses and eventually becomes downward velocity.


Can an object's velocity reverse direction when its acceleration is constant?

Yes, it can, if the initial velocity vector of an object was in opposite direction to its constant acceleration. Example: Anything you toss with your hand has constant acceleration after you toss it ... the acceleration of gravity, directed downward. If you toss it upward, it starts out with upward velocity, which reverses and eventually becomes downward velocity.


Can a direction of velocity of an object reverse at constant acceleration?

Sure. A pendulum and a park swing both have constant acceleration due to gravity, and the direction of their velocity changes over and over again until they're stopped.


Can a velocity be reversed if acceleration is constant?

Sure. A pendulum, a child's playground swing, and a bullet shot straight up all have constant acceleration, and all reverse direction.


Can an object with a constant acceleration reverse it direction of travel?

Of course. Anything you toss with your hand has constant acceleration after you toss it ... the acceleration of gravity, directed downward. If you toss it upward, it starts out with upward velocity, which reverses and eventually becomes downward velocity.


Can the velocity reverse the direction when acceleration is constant?

Yes. A typical example is that you throw something up, and after a while it falls back down again. Assuming air resistance is negligible, acceleration is constant in this case.




Can an object with a constant acceleration reverse its direction of travel?

Sure. A common example is when you throw a stone up. The acceleration is basically constant (air resistance tends to be negligible, if the stone is large enough); after a while, it will reverse the direction, and fall back down.


An object that reverses direction while its acceleration remains constant?

An object can reverse direction anytime its velocity is in the opposite direction of its acceleration.A good example is throwing a ball straight up into the air. As soon as the ball leaves your hand, the acceleration due to gravity begins to slow it down. Even though the initial velocity is going straight up, once the ball leaves your hand the acceleration is constantly pulling the ball back towards earth. The ball eventually reaches its peak height, and reverses direction, falling back to earth. This all happens while the acceleration remains constant.


What characterizes constant velocity motion on a position time graph?

A straight line with a constant slope. But the reverse is not true. A straight line with a constant slope only means constant speed in the radial direction. The velocity may have components at right angles to the radial direction that are changing.


When an object's initial velocity is less than its final velocity what does that indicate?

AccelerationWhen the velocity of an object increases or decreases, that means it has accelerated. Acceleration is defined as the rate of change of velocity.If an object's final velocity is greater than its initial velocity, that indicates positive acceleration. If an object's final velocity is less than its initial velocity -- if, say, it slows down and comes to a stop -- then that indicates negative acceleration. Deceleration is another way of saying negative acceleration. But . . .It is good idea to avoid using the term deceleration, because an object that is experiencing negative acceleration may slow down, come to a stop momentarily, and then reverse direction and speed up -- IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION!You can think of it this way: When an object is slowing down, its acceleration is in the direction opposite to its motion. We think of that as negative acceleration.


Can an object reverse its direction while maintaining a constant acceleration?

I'm pretty sure a cheetah can do that. Newton's first law of motion states that an object at rest will remain at rest and an object in motion at a constant speed will remain in motion in the same direction at the same speed unless acted upon by another external force. This force creates an additional acceleration on the object. I'm thinking of a ball in free fall being stopped by the ground and "bouncing" it is under constant acceleration and until it makes contact with the ground to apply a external force thus an external or additional acceleration. I would say no it can't unless it's mass changes during the reversal of direction. But then that wouldn't be constant acceleration either ========================================= Everybody is overthinking this. A ball tossed straight up has constant downward acceleration, due to gravity. As soon as the downward acceleration eats up the initial upward velocity, the ball peaks, the velocity becomes downward, and the ball starts to drop. Acceleration is constant from the instant the ball leaves the hand.



Will the acceleration be zero if velocity is constant in velocity time graph?

Yes, by definition, Acceleration is the derivative of velocity. From Calculus, we know, the derivative of any constant function is simply 0. Therefore, any velocity time graph containing a constant velocity function will have an acceleration function = 0. c'=0 or c d/dx=0 also, there is a very simple, and nice progression to things in the field of Kinematics. where given a function, whether it be position, velocity, or acceleration, you can find the other through calculus. the progression for integration goes as follows, jolt (the feeling you get when acceleration changes), acceleration, velocity, position. And the reverse for derivatives. Having a velocity function of something like 55mph, think of it as driving on the freeway, absent of outside forces of friction, air resistance and hills, you never have to accelerate (positively, or negatively) to maintain speed, and the math backs that up. 55 is constant, and the derivative is 0. now if you had a velocity function such as 2x^2 + 5, also known as a parabolic function, you would take the derivative and get an acceleration of 4x, and a jolt of 4, and if you integrate to get position, you would have 2/3x^3+5x. Its all about the math.


How are velocity acceleration and deceleration related?

velocity is the rate of change of displacement with time, or v = dx/dt Acceleration is the rate of change of velocity with time, a = dv/dt deceleration in the true sense doesn't exist, for it is just a term for negative acceleration. You wouldn't say that you are develociting if you are in reverse.


Can an object with constant acceleration reverse its direcrion?

Yes. For instance, if you throw an object up, then (ignoring air friction) it will have a constant downward acceleration of about 9.8 meters/second squared. After a while, this acceleration will make it go downwards again.


Can an object have zero velocity and non-zero acceleration?

Yes, an object can have have zero velocity and non-zero acceleration. This happens when an object is at rest and when a force is applied on it such as gravity. But this isn't always true. A good example of another situation is when you throw an object vertically up into the air. Such an object will be acted upon by the constant acceleration of gravity. Due to this acceleration, it will slow down, then it will reverse direction, and finally it will fall back to the ground. At the exact point at the top of its path before falling back down, the object will have zero velocity. Yet it will still be accelerating towards the ground the whole time. The object is being accelerated by the force of gravity throughout its entire journey.


Give an example where both velocity and acceleration are negative?

you backing out of your driveway and slowing down to check for traffic (assuming forward is positive velocity and reverse is negative)



What procedure you used for checking the condition and serviceability of a constant velocity joint?

If you have the CV ( constant velocity joint ) in front of you it will be without any play in the bearings, the bearings will not be cracked or loose. the splines on each end will be without burs. If still in the vehicle you will notice a grind or clunk (both in forward and reverse), from the front of the car, more so under acceleration



Is it possible for velocity to have a negative value?

Yes velocity is a vector that has both speed and direction. So if you are going 30 mph in one direction that may be positive, but if you are going in reverse that may be negative.


Can an object reverse its direction of travel while maintaining a costant acceleration?

I Don't Believe so, i think once direction of travel is reversed it contradicts the definition of acceleration. technically i suppose this could be true, If a body was moving due east with an acceleration of 2m/s^2 , and if it could stop literally instantly without deceleration and immediately set off again due west with an acceleration of 2m/s^2 technically it would hav maintained constant acceleration but i think there is a moment there as it changes direction where it can not be constant. tbh , thinking about it unless the change was absolutely instantaneous which I'm relatively sure is impossible, it would be necessary for there to be some flux in the acceleration. so in conclusion, NO


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