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Answered 2011-09-19 22:59:51

Generally the custodial parent has the right to claim the child. You need to speak with an attorney or tax consultant.

Generally the custodial parent has the right to claim the child. You need to speak with an attorney or tax consultant.

Generally the custodial parent has the right to claim the child. You need to speak with an attorney or tax consultant.

Generally the custodial parent has the right to claim the child. You need to speak with an attorney or tax consultant.

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Answered 2011-09-19 22:59:51

Generally the custodial parent has the right to claim the child. You need to speak with an attorney or tax consultant.

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No, the IRS clearly states that only the person who has physical custody of the child for over 50% of the year can claim that child as a dependent. If the child did not live with you for at least 183 out of 365 days, you cannot claim the child on your taxes.


Yes. They aren't an adult until they are 18 and if they still live in your home and you support them you can claim them on your taxes.


Child support arrears live on until they are paid. The custodial parent should pursue any arrears in court, obtain a court order that establishes the amount of the arrears and request any help possible from the state child support enforcement agency.


Not on taxes no. The parent the child lives with has the main right to claim the child. But if that parent can't or doesn't want to then the other parent can


The child that the child actually lives with for most of the year can claim the EIC on the child. If the divorce agreement specifies that a non-custodial parent can claim the child on his or her taxes, it does not mean that he or she can claim the EIC on the child. EIC is not granted in court orders. To claim EIC, you must pass the age, relationship, and residency requirements. If the child does not actually live with the non-custodial parent for most of the year than the non-custodial parent may NOT claim the child.



At 18 you are an adult and if you no longer live with them or have them pay for your expenses they shouldn't claim you on the taxes.



If you have paid for more than half of their support and they do not claim themselves on their taxes, I believe you can claim them as long as you have documentation to prove it.


fed tax 1/3 of your check with out a dependent ... the other half (state) would depend on what state you live in ...


No, only the parent who has physical custody of the child for more than 50% of the tax year can claim the child.


If he has the child more than 50% of the time, which need to be documented.


Can you claim him on your taxes? If you live in the US, yes, you can, if he's a full-time student and would be considered your dependant.


Only one person can claim a person. Once a person is claimed as a dependent, no one lese can claim him. Does your divorce agreement state who is allowed to claim your son for income tax purposes? If not, the custodial parent has a higher right to claim the child than the non-custodial parent. him paying child support does not grant him any rights to claim your son either.


The employer pays its unemployment taxes to the state the employer is located in. You might file your claim with the state you live in, but your state would then process the claim through the "liable state".


Yes but you must be able to claim them even though you gave up the dependency. The child must live with you all year.


I'm trying and failing to conceive of a scenario in which a person might even for a second think this could possibly be legal. So, you're not the child's parent, and the child doesn't live with you, and yet, somehow, you think there's a chance you might be able to claim them on your taxes?In an attempt to take this seriously: there's a worksheet in the tax instructions designed to help you figure out if you can claim someone as a dependent. Fill that out, and it will answer your question.


If the child lived with you for over 50% of the year (183 out of 365 days) then yes, you can claim the child as a dependent on your tax return, even if they don't live with you now.



You claim your residency generally where you live, however, if you own property like a house in another state, you may claimThe state your home is located is where you pay your taxes as that is where you have a vested interest.


You have to go back to court and try to negotiate a plan to pay your arrears. However, if the situation has gone as far as you losing your license then you haven't been paying for a long time. Child enforcement doesn't take driving privileges for first time arrears. That means you must have had a job and weren't paying. You still owe the arrears.



The State where the judgment was entered, the State where the child[ren] live and the State where the obligor lives all have jurisdiction to enforce such a judgment.




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