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2010-03-30 18:15:05
2010-03-30 18:15:05

You do not have to have a motorcycle endorsement but you do have to have a valid drivers license.

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You need a motorcycle license for a moped over 50ccs. You need a moped license for under 50cc.


If you live in California and your scooter is 50ccs or less, no license is required. If your scooter is more than 50cc's you need a motorcycle license. Check with your local DMV for more details on how to obtain your scooter license. stonemkr reverse painting on glass.


Yes, anything over 50CCs you need a motorcycle licence.


where I live, you have to have a learner's permit and take a special course to ride a scooter or pocket bike under 50ccs, but you could ride it off-road anytime as long as you don't go on anyone else's property without asking them first. google your local DOT office if you need any more help.


You need a motorcycle license to drive a moped over 50ccs. You must be at least sixteen years old to get a motorcycle license.


49 Anything 50ccs and over requires a motorcycle endorsement.


I spent the day trying to find the answer to this question myself. So, here's the answer: NO. As long as the scooter has an engine of 50CCs or less and does not go more than 30mph on a flat/level road. If your scooter fits the criteria above, you do not need a license, insurance or tags on the bike. But, you also cannot drive the scooter on any road with a speed limit of more than 45mph, or Interstates, of course. So, any road under 45mph, you're golden. Hope this helps! =) I have a DUI in vrginia and I want to know if I can drive a moped in North Carolina


Its depends on the state. If its under 50CC, it may be classified as a moped. If its over 50CCs, it must be registered and a motorcycle license is required


it depends on what on you have cause if u have a road one then yeah if you have a of road one then no ============================================================ For most states, if the scooter's engine is less than 50ccs, and it is limited to no more than 30 (or, in some cases, 35) mph, then you usually are not required to be licensed. There are exceptions: Texas, for one. You need to check your state's DOT requirements to find out for sure.


well 1 tsp is 5 cc's, so 50 cc's would be 10 teaspoons


I'm assuming you mean US tablespoons 50ccs = 3.38 tablespoons = 10.14 teaspoons


Depends on what you're looking for. There are 55cc and under models that many places allow you to drive without a license, motorcycle endorsement, or underage. Clear up to 650 and 750cc "cruisers" that you can drive cross-country and cost upwards of $10k. The "big name" Japanese brands are arguably "best" (Yamaha, Honda, etc.) I have a Yamaha "Zuma" 49cc. It's reliable, as quick as a sub-50ccs get, and looks more like a dirt/sport bike than a girly Euro-style scooter, which I think is good. Of course if you like the "girly Euro-style"you can get a genuine Italian Vespa or one of the look alikes (Honda Metropolitan). There are a bunch of small motor Chinese scoots (Kymco, Eton, and "who the heck knows") that are half the price of the things I've mentioned. But they're unreliable slow junk, and when they break.... good luck finding exact parts. They're the "Bic lighter" of scooters... disposable. But I think $1000 is way too much to gamble on a "disposable" item.


Where I live, that would be a negative. You cannot ride any motorized vehicle of more than 50ccs on the street without having your learner's permit and taking a moped class. If you are 16 and have your full licence, you still have to have a motorcycle licence and the bike has to meet certain standards. (has to have headlights, turn signals, etc.) So unless you can find somewhere to ride it where you have enough space and don't have to trespass, I'd recommend finding a new hobby.



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