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A person can sue for almost any reason. Whether or not it is a justifiable case is usually the question. Was there emotional and/or physical injury to the plaintiff? Was there any monetary loss? What purpose if any would litigation serve. Lawsuits are not, as a rule timely, inexpensive or even the solution to the problem(s). A counselor/mediator however, might be more helpful.

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โˆ™ 2015-07-15 18:30:02
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Q: Can you sue the custodial parent for lost visitation time if you are denied visitation?
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If a parent's normal visitation is interrupted by a holiday are they entitled to make up the lost visitation time?

Custodial issues are determined by the terms of the original or amended custodial/visitation court order. If the order does not specify the terms of such issues as holidays, it is up to the primary custodial parent (the one whom the child resides) to decide when or if visitation should occur.


Can non custodial parent be denied visitations due t child ilness?

Yes. The court would not sanction a custodial parent for keeping a sick child at home if, for example, they were suffering with the flu. The decision would be in the best interest of the child to be kept comfortable and monitored during the illness. Visitation rights are not simply territorial rights. The non-custodian parent should consider the child's comfort and the perhaps some of the lost visitation time could be made up at another time.


Can a parent receive visitation for a child that they lost parental rights to?

Only if the sole custody parent is willing.


Can visitation be lost if not the bilogical father?

depends on state law and parent/child relationship


At what age can a child opt out of visitation with the non-custodial parent?

The child cannot opt out in most jurisdictions until they reach eighteen years of age. If the non-custodial parent has court ordered visitation and the child does not go for those visits, then the custodial parent can be held in contempt of court. If there is a legitimate reason why the child does not want to go, then you need to petition the court to change the visitation order. Be aware that courts do not like to deny a parent visitation with their children and will not do so without a VERY compelling reason.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spend quality time with the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the father's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationship gradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The option of spending some private quality time with their parent should always be an option.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm.


Is there assistance for the non custodial parent who pays child support and they have lost their job?

Yes, see links


If you give up your parental rights to your child do you have rights to their children?

No you do not. If you gave them up or lost them, you legally have no right concerning anything with them, legally. Look over the paperwork the courts gave you. Make better choices next time. I do not agree with the above post. It is my understanding that if you have visitation rights as agreed upon in Court Documents you have a right to the child. The Custodial Parent may not move and or interrupt your visitation rights.


Can a 13 yr old refuse visitation with non custodial parent in Oklahoma?

Court ordered visitations are not optional. If the order isn't followed the custodial parent could be found in contempt of a court order and sanctioned by the court.Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge. A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spend quality time with the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the non-custodial's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationship gradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The opportunity of spending some private quality time with their parent should always be an option.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent if that continues. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm to both the child and the parent.


Can your 13 year old son refuse to see his non custodial parent in Ohio?

No. Visitation schedules set by a court are not optional. Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge. A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spend quality time with the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the father's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationshipgradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The option of spending some private quality time with their parent should always be an option.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm


Can a father who has joint custody with the mother stop her from moving to another state with child Before they go to court?

In most situations, a custodial parent must notify the court of an intended out of state move, as it affects the non custodial parent's visitation rights. At that time, the non custodial parent can present evidence as to why they feel that moving the child is not in the child's best interest and petition for a change of custodial rights. The judge may or may not agree, but, will make a decision and change the order for visitation and support as needed. Pending this court action, the non custodial parent can petition the court for a stay or restraining order informing the custodial parent that it is unlawful to remove the child from their state of residence until a decision can be reached. I warn you against using the child as leverage to plot some sort of revenge against your spouse. The Judge can see through these attempts and any kind of leverage that you may have had in splitting travel expenses, or extending visitation periods will be lost. On the other hand, if you can provide a stable home environment for the child and nothing else needs to be changed, such as what school they are attending and if moved the custodial parent will not have a stable home or income, then you may be able to stop it. The court does not care what is best for you, only what is best for the child. In short, yes, you can file for the court to stop the child from moving out of state until the case can be heard. ( your local state laws may differ though so contact a lawyer )


Is it okay for a custodial parent to refuse their five year old child from flying to other parent with a flight attendant as a chaperone and also tell the child to say they will be scared and get lost?

Parental Alienation


Does a sixteen year old child have to visit a parent with visitation rights in Wisconsin?

Yes. Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge. A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spend quality time with the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the father's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationship gradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The option of spending some private quality time with their parent should always be an option.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm.


Do you have to let your son go to his father's?

If there is a standing visitation order, yes.Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge. A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spend quality time with the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the father's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationship gradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The option of spending some private quality time with their parent should always be an option.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm.


Can a child refuse to go visit non-custodial parent at age 10?

No. Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge. A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spend quality time with the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the father's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationshipgradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The option of spending some private quality time with their parent should always be an option.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm.


What happens to child support when children refuse to visit in New York State?

Child support and visitation are two separate issues so nothing will happen with the child support. It must be paid as usual.And the children are minors and do not have a say in visitation. It is the parents legal responsibility to uphold the court order so they just have to make the children go. The children can choose when they are 18yo or if you go to court and have the order modified.There are many situations where children say no but that is where we need to step in so they do not make the mistake of losing the relationship with a parent. Children do not always know what's best.Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge.Generally, a child is not free to decide not to visit until they reach eighteen years of age.A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spendquality timewith the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the father's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationshipgradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The option of spending some private quality time with their parent shouldalwaysbe an option.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm.


What is the climax of the story the visitation of gods?

the necklace was lost


What should you do when a child is refusing to visit the other parent for court ordered visitations?

Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge.Generally, a child is not free to decide not to visit until they reach eighteen years of age.A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spend quality time with the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the father's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationship gradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The option of spending some private quality time with their parent should always be an option.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm.


Has Britney Spears completely lost custody and visitation rights of her kids?

No, Britney Spears currently has visitation rights for her boys.


When does the non-custodial parent's medical insurance coverage stop for a child of divorced parents?

It would depend on why it stopped. If the non-custodial parent lost his or her job and their medical insurance along with it, the courts may not expect the unemployed parent to maintain medical insurance if doing so would be financially impossible. However, child support would continue as all states allow unemployment benefits to be garnished for that purpose. If the non-custodial parent is unemployed, it's doubtful the remaining unemployment benefits would be enough to purchase medical insurance for the child, but if the custodial parent wanted to push it, he or she could file an action against the non-custodial parent for enforcement, but you can't get blood from a turnip. All that may result is the non-custodial parent going to jail making it impossible for them to seek work and harder to find a job with an arrest record after they get out. It would be easier to see if the child qualified for Medicaid and used that until the custodial parent found another job and could put the child on the new insurance plan.If the insurance was dropped "just because", in that case, the custodial parent should file notification of violation or a motion for enforcement in the court with jurisdiction over the child.AnswerIt would depend on the laws in effect at the time (regarding to what age a child can be covered on a parents medical insurance), the separation agreement if any and any child support orders in effect. You should review all the court orders in your file and speak with an advocate at the court or an attorney if you still have questions.


Would a Court force an 8 year old to go to her dad's when she hates going there because he's always working never there and her step mother and his other kids take care of her?

Yes but maybe after a short break and therapy. Not going means no bonds created with her dad and siblings and step mom. It's important she gets to know the whole family not just her dad. It's a new situation but the court will not deny her this rights even though she might not see how good it is now. Children don't always see ever side of things so we have to intervene. for their own goodAnother PerspectiveThis type of problem needs to be addressed by all the parties involved.Court orders must be followed until they can be modified by returning to court and placing the issue before the judge. A custodial parent who doesn't honor the standing visitation order is in contempt of a court order and the court can order a modification of the custody order if the contempt continues. A child cannot refuse to visit the other parent until they reach eighteen years of age in virtually every state in the United States.When a child refuses to visit the other parent the primary custodial parent must first take steps to determine the cause of the refusal. A professional may be of help at this time. The child may have legitimate reasons and once identified both parents must work together to address the problem. The non-custodial parent may need some advice on how to spendquality timewith the child so the child feels both welcome and comfortable in the non-custodial parent's new environment.This is a common mistake made by non-custodial parents. The child misses them and looks forward to spending time with them but that time comes and there is a stranger present. The child's comfort level plunges. Being forced to spend visitations with people other than the parent is not a good idea until the child has had a chance to adjust to the new family dynamics between the child and the parents. The dynamics of coping with the father's new partner should come much later.Uncomfortable sleeping arrangements can make a child reluctant to go for visits. If there are other children in the picture (belonging to the non-custodial parent's new partner) they should be allowed to develop a relationshipgradually. A common problem arises for the child whose non-custodial parent makes no special notice of the child during visits and expects the child to spend their time with those other children as part of a new "family unit". In those situations the child has lost a special parent-child connection with the non-custodial parent. The option of spending some private quality time with their parent shouldalwaysbe an option. Remember, the object of the visitation order is to provide the child and parent time together.If the child's concerns are serious and the non-custodial parent will not cooperate, the custodial parent may need to return to court for a modification of the visitation order. On the other hand, when the situation is evaluated by the court it may find that parent alienation is at the root of the difficulties and if serious, the custodial parent may well lose physical custody to the other parent. Alienating a child against the other parent causes irreparable and long lasting harm.


Can a parent who has lost parental rights stop the other parent from leaving the state?

No.No.No.No.


Write a letter to a parent informing them that their child has lost a book?

Dear Parent/Guardian, I am writing to inform you that your child has lost or misplaced a book.


Will you be extradited for leaving Ohio to another state with your kid that you just lost custody of?

custodial interference and abduction


Does a person under the age of 18 who has lost a parent qualify as an orphan?

No if the other parent is still alive, legally the other parent has to take care of you


Are there other fathers who lost their children to a narcissistic spouse after divorce?

A one word answer would be Yes. Narcissistic disorder is sometimes not the easiest one to identify and it is quite possible that a person may get away with it and retain custody - assuming she choses to retain custody for any reason. In the majority of US states parents must file a parenting plan with the court when custodial rights are in dispute. Custodial issues are decided on what is in the best interest of the child, and it's up to the other parent and his or her attorney to prove the opposing parent is narcissistic. But even if they do prove it, that doesn't necessarily mean the judge will definitely rule one way or the other. It varies from case to case, judge to judge, and parent to parent.