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Can you use marsala wine in chestnut soup?

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2011-04-25 09:39:36
2011-04-25 09:39:36

Haven't really heard of using Marsala Wine in Chestnut soup. if you are looking for what ingredients they mainly use in Chestnut Soup, then here is a short and simple list.

Ingredients are :

2 tablespoons of butter

1/2 pounds of chestnuts

2 cups of chicken stock

1 teaspoon of ground coriander

1/4 cup sherry

1 tsp of lemon juice

salt as per taste

2 tbsp of flour and

2 cups of milk

Here's how you can prepare it:

1. Get a cooking pot and place inside 1/2 pound of chestnuts and cover with water. Give it a medium cooking heat and boil for 10 minutes. When its little hot, start removing the chestnuts and peel them. This will make it easier for removing the inside skin.

2. Next to the pot, add 2 cups of chicken stock and add blanched chestnuts to it.

3. For Mashing the Chestnuts, get a sleeve.

4. Next, get a nice clean bowl and mix 2 cups of milk, 2 tablespoon of flour and 2 tablespoon of butter thoroughly and add to it, chestnuts and chicken stock. As per your taste, season the dish with salt ,1/4 cup of sherry, 1 teaspoon of lemon juice and 1 teaspoon of ground coriander.

That's all, the chestnuts soup is prepared. Hope this helps.

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I like to use a soup spoon.

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