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Can you use number 12 wire to run lights?

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2015-07-15 18:46:17
2015-07-15 18:46:17

Yes, lighting and wall receptacles use 12/2 wiring. Put no more than 10 lights, or outlets, or a combination of both on one circuit. Outlets for the refrigerator, microwave, washing machine, whirlpool bath, dishwasher, and garbage disposal, should each be on a dedicated circuit all their own. Kitchens require two dedicated circuits for wall receptacles. Check you local area for any variations of these codes.

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Provided you use wire that is rated for 20 amps.

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At the lights there is a black, white and bare wire from the supply. With power off you would break the black (Hot) connection at wirenut. Then you just need to run a wire to and from the switch. Assume you use standard Romex with black, white and bare wires. Connect the black wire to the black wire from supply. Connect the white wire going to the switch to the black wire going to lights. Wrap black electric tape around each end of white wire to show it is HOT. At the switch end connect the white wire to one lug on switch and black to the other. Connect the bare wire to ground on switch and at light to other bare wires.


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