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2012-02-17 03:37:24
2012-02-17 03:37:24

Speed and velocity always have the same magnitude, because

speed is the magnitude of velocity.

The difference is that velocity has a direction but speed doesn't

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velocity is a vector and speed is scalar. Velocity has magnitude and directions, with magnitude being speed. The magnitude of average velocity and average speed is the same.


The magnitude(the value). Speed is only magnitude Velocity is magnitude & direction


Instantaneous speed is the magnitude of the velocity. Velocity also states the [direction] of the speed.


No. Speed is the magnitude of velocity and acceleration is the change of velocity in time.


The magnitude of both can be the same.


Velocity being a vector, it is tricky to say that "velocity increases or decreases". Its magnitude might decrease - but its magnitude is, precisely, the speed.


Yes.Velocity is a vector so it includes the direction as well as the magnitude. Speed is a scalar, it only has a magnitude.


No, velocity is a vector quantity (i.e. magnitude & direction) while speed is a scalar quantity (i.e. magnitude only).


Angular velocity is given as radians per second; angular speed is also the same thing. Velocity is a vector with magnitude and direction and speed a scalar with magnitude only. The magnitude is identical; velocity will define the direction of rotation ( clockwise or counterclockwise).


No. The speed is the same, the velocity is not. The term "velocity" includes the indication of the direction. Two velocities are the same if they have the same magnitude (e.g., both are 40 km/hour), AND the same direction.No. The speed is the same, the velocity is not. The term "velocity" includes the indication of the direction. Two velocities are the same if they have the same magnitude (e.g., both are 40 km/hour), AND the same direction.No. The speed is the same, the velocity is not. The term "velocity" includes the indication of the direction. Two velocities are the same if they have the same magnitude (e.g., both are 40 km/hour), AND the same direction.No. The speed is the same, the velocity is not. The term "velocity" includes the indication of the direction. Two velocities are the same if they have the same magnitude (e.g., both are 40 km/hour), AND the same direction.


Velocity is a vector; to specify velocity, you indicate a speed (a magnitude), and a direction. If two objects move in different directions, their velocities will be different, even if their speeds are the same.Velocity is a vector; to specify velocity, you indicate a speed (a magnitude), and a direction. If two objects move in different directions, their velocities will be different, even if their speeds are the same.Velocity is a vector; to specify velocity, you indicate a speed (a magnitude), and a direction. If two objects move in different directions, their velocities will be different, even if their speeds are the same.Velocity is a vector; to specify velocity, you indicate a speed (a magnitude), and a direction. If two objects move in different directions, their velocities will be different, even if their speeds are the same.


Yes, the magnitude of speed is the same as the magnitude of velocity. Velocity V= s(R/r)= sR' where s is the speed and R'=(R/r) is the unit vector in the direction R, where R is a position vector and r is the magnitude of R. So "s' is the magnitude (scalar) of the velocity. In Physics, a rotating object can have constant speed and changing direction. A car can have the same speed on the speedometer and experience a force as it turns at the this constant speed. The turning creates a force as there is acceleration caused by the change in velocity, in this case the change in direction, not the change in speed..


acceleration is change in velocity over time. It is important to know that speed is not a vector quantity; it is scalar (meaning it does not have direction), -- velocity does. Therefore, speed is only the MAGNITUDE of velocity. Also, acceleration is a vector quantity meaning it has both magnitude and direction. If you change EITHER magnitude or DIRECTION, acceleration changes. Okay anyway to answer your question, You can have the same magnitude of velocity (aka same speed) and still be accelerating if YOU CHANGE DIRECTION. --- gh


Velocity is a vector quantity. That means it has direction and magnitude. Speed is a scalar quantity, it only has magnitude. It is possible to have constant speed and constant velocity but it is also possible to have constant speed but changing velocity if the object is changing direction.


A "radar gun" is used by police to know the speed of fast moving vehicles. Velocity is a vector. That means it has magnitude and direction. Its magnitude is same as speed.


Velocity is a vector, meaning it has a direction, like east, north, up. Speed isa magnitude without direction, 60 miles per hour is a speed; 60 miles per hour north is a velocity. When a care is going 60 mph in a circle the speed is constant but the velocity changes as the direction changes. The magnitude of the velocity is the same but the direction changes thus the velocity changes. Velocity changes if either the speed/magnitude or the direction change.


No. Speed is the magnitude of the velocity vector. If velocities are the same, their magnitudes are the same, which is another way of saying that the speeds are the same.It can work the other way around, however ... same speed but different velocities, meaning same speed in different directions.


No, they don't. Velocity is a vector - made up of both a magnitude (number), and a direction. If any of the two changes, the velocity is not the same. If you are interested only in the magnitude, you talk about "speed", not "velocity".


Yes, if you want to get technical about it. 'Velocity' is a quantity that has both magnitude (size) and direction. The magnitude of the velocity is what we call the speed. Strictly speaking, you can change the 'velocity' by changing only its direction. When that happens, the velocity has changed, but the speed hasn't. A perfect example is a race car doing a steady 150 mph on a circular track. The velocity is changing CONSTANTLY, but the speed NEVER changes.


No. Speed is the magnitude of the velocity vector. In order for two velocities to be equal, they must have equal magnitudes and equal (parallel) directions.


It's speed (the magnitude of its velocity) increases.


Speed and velocity are the same in magnitude; but speed is a scalar and velocity a vector; a vector has magnitude and direction. For example if an object is moving with a speed of 100 mph in a certain direction its velocity is 100 mph in that direction. If it changes direction ate same speed and you want to compute distance traveled, etc., you would need to use vector addition. We sometimes use speed and velocity interchangeably which is fine for talking purposes.


Velocity is a vector and its magnitude depends on the direction. If it is positive in one direction, going in the opposite direction it is negative. But speed is a scalar and does not depend on the direction. It has the same value, whatever the direction. That is how the absolute value of velocity is speed.



=== === Since momentum is a vector and not a scalar quantity, to have the same momentum, they must have the same direction. Remember, vectors have magnitude and direction. Speed is the magnitude part of velocity. Since momentum is the product of mass (a scalar) and velocity (a vector) if two objects are moving in different directions, even if they have the same mass and speed, their momentums are different.



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