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Answered 2009-10-09 08:46:20

Can an illegal alien who was deported and barred for ten years come back sooner by marrying an us citizen?

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Yes. It is illegal to marry ANYONE for citizenship purposes only. That person could be deported and barred from life from this country and the citizen that married him/her could face hefty fines or prison time.


A foreign national who is convicted of a felony will be deported after they serve their imposed sentence and in most cases permanently barred for applying for reentry into the US. Marriage to a US citizen, if allowed will not alter the penalty, the person will still be deported and barred from the US.


The same thing that would happen to a citizen, the person will be taken into custody by authorities and jailed in a local and/or state and/or federal facility. The difference between the citizen and the immigrant obviously would be that after the unlawfully present immigrant has served the imposed sentence(s) he or she will be deported and permanently barred from entering the U.S.


If the illegal filed a petition, or was listed in a petition (I-130) before April 2001, and living inside the U.S., then there should be no problem and the illegal can adjust status based on marriage. If the illegal entered LEGALLY, but overstayed, then there should be no problem and the illegal can adjust status based on marriage. If the illegal entered ILLEGALLY, then the illegal is absolutely screwed and CANNOT become legal based on marriage to citizen. The only hope would be a hardship waiver (I-601, which is EXTREMELY hard to get) that is done in the illegal's home country. If that fails, then the illegal is barred for 10 years from entry into the U.S. (based on the overstay of years). Or the illegal can surrender to ICE and try to do a cancellation of removal (deportation). But this is also hard to win. And if the illegal loses, they WILL be deported.


Many people do this, but the illegal alien is taking advantage by asking either a man or woman to marry them so they can stay in that particular country. Yes, you could get into trouble, and if you don't get into trouble with your government, the person who is an illegal alien can cause you trouble. Marriage is marriage and you may have a tough time getting out of it. Don't do it! Let this person get into the U.S. the right way ... through immigration! * Marrying in an attempt to attain permanent residency or ciritzenship status is in violation of federal law. If convicted of fraudulent marriage either or both participants can be incarcerated in a federal facility for a maximum of 5 years with a maximum $200,00 fine. The marriage will be declared invalid and the foreign national will be deported after serving the imposed sentence and permanently barred from applying for reentry. The US citizen will have a permanent criminal record of having committed a federal felony. In addition, marrying a US citizen no longer guarantees the foreign national will be granted US citizenship.


AnswerThe INS is now the Immigration and Custom Enforcement (I.C.E)You need to be careful! The INS is out and looking for illegal aliens! If they find you, you will be deported to the country that you are originally from. I am from a small town that has alot of illegal aliens and they all thought that they would be safe there, and that INS would not find them because it is such a small town. Well guess what?! They found them and 70 some illegal aliens were sent back to where they were from. Even if you are illegal and you get married to a US citizen, you are still illegal. Getting married does not make you a legal citizen of the US. I know because I married a legal alien and he still had to go to the INS to become a US citizen. Marriage to a US citizen does not confer permanent residence status or citizenship.The US citizen spouse can no longer apply for any status for a spouse who is unlawfully present in the US.Because of the length of overstay cited the unlawfully present foreign national is subject to deportation and will be barred from applying for legal reentry for the required 10 years.The exception is, if the foreign national qualifies for refugee or asylee status.United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, http://www.uscis.govImmigration and Customs Enforcement, http://www.ice.gov


Marrying a U.S. citizen DOES NOT confer citizenship nor does it insure permanent resident status for the immigrant spouse. It does change the priority in which either issue would be handled by the USCIS. Marrying a foreign national for the purpose of said person gaining residency or citizenship is a violation of federal law. If a "marriage of convenience" is proven the penalties are severe, both could face criminal charges carrying a 5-year prison sentence and a $250,000 fine. In addition after serving his or her sentence, the immmigrant spouse would be deported and barred permanently from entering the U.S., and the citizen spouse would have a criminal felony record.


No. A foreign national who has been found to be unlawfully present for a period of 6 months but less than 12 months will be deported and barred from applying for legal entrance for three years. One who has been found to be unlawfully present for more than a 12 moths will be deported and barred from applying for legal entrance for a period of 10 years. Any foreign national who has been deported for reasons pertaining to criminal acts can be refused legal entry permanently. Due the stringent requirements of the Patriot Act and DHS regulations, state's are enforcing strict guidelines for identification for applications of all licenses including that of marriage. Foreign nationals presenting will routinely have indentification documents checked by DHS and/or ICE. If false indentification is used the marriage will not be legal and thereby null and void any application for permanent residency or citizenship. In additon both parties can be subject to being charged under the Fradulent Marriage Act. Such a crime is a federal felony carrying a maximum sentence of five years in a federal prison and $250,000 fine.


No, an alien or immigrant, legal or otherwise, does not become a citizen automatically upon marriage to a citizen. There is a process of applying, processing and (hopefully) eventual approval by the Federal government. First is Permanent Residency status ("Green card"). Then there's a wait of 3 years or more - depending on situation - for citizenship qualification. The website for the agency which handles this process is: USCIS.GOV An illegal alien does not automatically become a citizen by marrying one. However, certain illegal aliens can get permanent residence status (often called the "green card") by marrying a US citizen. If the person originally entered the United States legally but overstayed his or her visa, than it is possible for him or her to "adjust status" to that of a permanent resident (i.e. get a "green card") if the US citizen fills out a series of petitions including one that proves that the US citizen can financially support the alien. If the alien entered illegally into the United States without any visa or permit, than that person cannot "adjust status" and has to leave the country before obtaining a green card. If the person was illegally in the country for more than a year, than he or she is barred from ever coming back for 10 years (known as the "10-year-bar") The only way to overcome having the 10-year-bar is by the US citizen spouse filing a petition for a waiver of the bar. The petition has to prove that it would cause extreme and exceptional hardship to him or her to move to his or her spouse's country. Only three years after the person has the green card can they apply for citizenship, and they must still be married to the original citizen who got the green card.


No holds (as in grapples) are barred (banned/disallowed). So basically you can do any type of throw or grapple no your opponent, even ones considered illegal or dangerous.


Entereing into a fraudulent marriage of convenience to obtain permanent residence status and/or citizenship is a federal felony offense. If convicted both parties are subject to a maximum sentence of 5 years in a federal facility and a $200,000 fine. After serving the imposed sentence the foreign national will be deported and permanently barred from reentering the US. If the citizen spouse is also convicted he or she will have a permanent record of a federal felony after serving the imposed sentence. Marriage to a US citizen no longer guarantees permanent residency or citizenship to a foreign national who is unlawfully present within the US.


Your criminal history and all the charges against you will never be changed simply because of the fact that you are married to a US citizen.


Yes. All Australian native mammals are protected by law.It is illegal to hunt, trap or take as a pet the eastern barred bandicoot.


Any time a foreign national has been deported and attempts to return to the United States he/she is guilty of "agravated re-entry" and upon conviction will be sent to Federal prison for a period of not less than 1 and not more than 10 years. * If the question refers to a person who has not been permanently deported, then the answer is yes; the person can, after the required time period has elapsed, apply for legal reentry into the US. A foreign national who was unlawfully present within the US for 12 months or less and is deported is barred from applying for reentry for 3 years. A foreign national who was unlawfully present within the US for more than 12 months and is deported is barred from applying for reentry for 10 years.


They can't bar foreign nationals without some grounds to do so unless they are a threat to national security or the safety and welfare of American citizens. You can consider filing a suit against INS for unlawful banishment of someone when she's got no record or any grounds and reason to be banned from the country separated from her child and husband. * A foreign national who is or was unlawfully present in the US can be deported and barred from applying for reentry for a specified amount of time or permanently. A person who is unlawfully present in the US for 12 months or less is barred from applying for reentry for 3 years. A person who is unlawfully present in the US for more than 12 months is barred from applying for reentry for 10 years. He or she does not need to commit a criminal offense to be deported if he or she were not in the US under legal status. Marriage to a US citizen does not constitute legal status to an illegal immigrant even if said person has a child. Goverment agencies such as USCIS, ICE, etc. cannot be sued. The best option is to contact a qualified immigration attorney to discuss what action might be applicable. US Immigration Support, http://www.usimmigrationsupport.com


Yes. Any American citizen who is 18 or older can vote without regard to his place of birth. (There are a few people who have been barred from voting due to criminal conviction.)


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No. If the student had taken steps before his or her studen visa expired, then it may have been possible. After such a lengthy time, the person would be required to voluntarily leave the US and return to their country of origin or be deported. Any person who is unlawfully present within the US for less than 12 months will be deported and barred from applying for reentry for 3 years. Any person who is unlawfully present within the US for more than 12 months will be deported and barred from applying for reentry for 10 years.


You must be old enough to vote.You must be a US citizen who has not been barred from voting.You must be properly registered.


The person is considered "out of status" or a "status violator" and must voluntarily return to their country of origin or be subject to deportation. If deported they will be barred from applying for reentry to the U.S. for at least one year or more.


Unless the unlawfully present person qualifies under asylee or refugee status he or she cannot apply for legal status within the US. The person must voluntarily leave the US or be deported. A foreign national who has resided unlawfully within the US for at least 12 months is subject to deportation and barred from applying for reentry for 3 years. A foreign national who has resided unlawfully within the US for more than 12 months is subject to deportation and barred from applying for reentry for 10 years.


Since the passage of the Voting Rights Act in the 1960's it has been illegal for any group to be barred from voting. Some irregular events have happened in elections, but these are individual incidents so there is no "wide" groups that are not allowed to vote.


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Barred Parakeet was created in 1853.


No. An immigrant who is unlawfully present within the US cannot be sponsored for permanent residency or citizenship. They must voluntarily return to their country of origin or face deportation. After leaving the US the foreign national will be barred from applying for reentry for 3-10 years depending upon the individual's circumstances.



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