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Comparison between Maslow and McClelland's Need theories?

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2011-07-13 09:12:09
2011-07-13 09:12:09

Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory

According to this theory, people have layers of needs, and until the lower-layer needs are satisfied, they will not move to satisfy the upper-layer needs. For example, if you are unemployed and broke, and as a result your very survival is in danger, you don't care about buying health insurance or life insurance or dating to look for a life partner.

McClelland's achievement motivation theory

According to this theory, the following three needs motivate people:

• Achievement - This is the need to perform well, achieve success, and get recognized for it. The key idea here is the drive to excel.

• Affiliation - This is the need or desire for good relationships at work. You want to feel connected at work.

• Power - This is the desire to move things, to influence people or events. The key term here is the world dominance or making a difference.

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The theories are: F.W Taylor, Maslow, Herzberg, Mc Gregor

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Will Maslow died in 2007.

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The distinguishing features between Abraham Maslow\'s hierarchy of needs model and Philip Selznick\'s institutional approach as natural systems perspective theories are (i) Maslow\'s needs theory focuses on the progressive stages of man\'s needs from the most basic physiological need to the most advanced one of self-actualization; whereas Selznick\'s institutional theory is focused on the organization and how rules and norms are established within it. (ii) Maslow\'s needs theory focuses on people whereas Selznick\'s institutional theory focuses on organizational systems.

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i think it James Maslow...

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Arkadi Maslow was born in 1891.

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Sophie Maslow was born in 1911.

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