Roman Empire

Did roman emperor's have the power to appoint members of the senate?

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2011-09-08 03:01:59
2011-09-08 03:01:59

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

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2011-09-08 03:01:59

Yes, in fact appointing able and capable men to the senate, regardless of their birth or wealth, was one of the reasons that the rule of Augustus was so successful. The emperor, because he was head of state during the principate, could appoint all the magistrates which automatically made them members of the senate.

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