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Does it benefit you if you have an interest only loan to pay extra toward your principle?

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2005-11-18 08:36:32
2005-11-18 08:36:32

Yes. The interest only loan is simply that. You are only paying the interest on your loan. None of your payment is going toward the principle loan amount. The main advantage of an interest only loan is the drastically low monthly payment that you make compared to a traditional mortgage. Most of the interest only loans are based on a 10yr. term and MUST be paid off at that time. Most borrowers refinance at the 10yr. mark. This program is offered to borrowers with very good credit. A smart borrower knows that in the early years of a traditional mortgage his payment goes almost entirely toward interest. Gradually over the life of the loan his payment will go more and more to principle until near the very end of the loan almost all of the payments he is making will be going toward principle. The interest only loan can be used to drastically increase the amount of your payment that goes to principle in the first 10 yrs.. Here's how. Keep in mind that these are not accurate numbers and are being used to make it simple for this answer. Let's say your current payment is $1200/mo. Out of that $1200 only $50 is going toward principle and the rest goes to interest. You choose to refinance with an interest only loan and your new payment is $750/mo. This reduces your monthly payment by $450/mo. Out of the new $750/mo. payment NOTHING goes toward principle. The savvy borrower pays $1000/mo. instead of the required $750 and $250/mo. goes toward principle. This is $200/mo. more going toward principle than the traditional mortgage where only $50 was going to principle. It is also $200/mo. less than you were payingbefore. So your monthly payment is lower and you are chipping away at the principle of the loan much faster at the same time. Do some math and you will see how much faster your loan amount decreases compared to a traditional mortgage. Another advantage of the interest only loan is that you are only required to make the $750/mo. payment. So if things are tight one month...you can just make the interest payment. It only takes a little gumption to make this work for you. I am a licensed Loan Officer and have seen first hand the benefits of this program when it is used properly. Hope this helps.

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You make extra payments toward the principal.You make extra payments toward the principal.You make extra payments toward the principal.You make extra payments toward the principal.


The earlier you can retire a loan, the more money you will save in interest. Assusming it's simple interest, in the first years very little of the payment is going to reduce the principle. Toward the end of the loan term, most of the payment is going to principle and very little to interest, so the benefit of paying it off early at that point is limited. On a long term loan like a home mortgage, you may find that over the course of the first year, the principle goes down by about the amount of one month's payment. That means that if you can pay the equivalent of one month's payment extra toward the principal, you will have reduced payoff time of the loan by a year.


Make your payments on time and pay as much extra on the principle. That will drop your interest as well. On most payment plans, you are paying the interest first and nothing on the principle. Put as much as you can into it and get it paid off quicker and cheaper.


When it comes to car loans you want to always make extra payments, whether it be an extra 20 bucks here and there. This will go to principle rather then interest. That way you are not paying only interest on your loan, and you are not gathering interest.


In a simple interest loan, you are paying interest on the amount of money you have borrowed in each payment period. When you make a payment, a certain amount of it goes to repay the loan, reducing the principle. In the next payment period, your interest is being calculated on a smaller amount borrowed. In the first payment, you are paying interest on the entire amount borrowed. In the next payment, you are paying interest on the amount borrowed minus the principle amount from the first payment. That's why paying extra principle early in the life of a loan can make a big difference in the time it takes to pay it off. In a 30 year home mortgage for example, in the first year the principle will be reduced by about the amount of one month's payment. If you make an extra payment toward the priniciple equal to one month's payment, you will have effectively gained an entire year in the retirement of the loan.


1 extra mortgage payment..principal & interestcan lower your term to about 19 years.


Not sure about U.S.A. loans, but in Canada, if you pay extra towards your mortgage, the entire payment goes towards the principle only. This is, of course, assuming that your mortgage agreement doesn't state otherwise, and that you are current in your regular required payments.


The more money you pay to principle, the less interest you pay on the remaining amount. So, you want to add a few dollars to each payment against the principle. Make sure that the lender is applying the extra amount correctly. Other than that, try to reduce expenses in any areas where the bills aren't fixed amounts and send that money toward what is owed.


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If the 3% is "simple" interest, then the $100 earns an extra $18 in 6 years. If the interest is compounded yearly, then it earns $19.41 extra. If the interest is compounded weekly, then it earns $19.72 extra.


You can mark it any way you wish. It'll actually go to principle only after you've satisfied the outstanding interest as of the date it's recieved.


A type of cost-benefit decision making that compares the extra benefits to the extra costs of an action


Homeowners trying to pay their loans early can send extra payments toward the principal. The best way is to set up a schedule to pay something extra toward the principal every month. The more you pay against the principal the more payback time will be eliminated and you will pay less back. You should check with your lender first to determine is there are any penalties for making extra payments toward the principal. Also, make certain the extra payments are being applied correctly by monitoring your statements regularly. See related links. There are several ways, but to expand on the comments above, paying extra every month is the best way to go. On a 250,000 mortgage at 5% for 30 years, paying just $200 extra per month reduces the number of monthly payments by 89, or 7.42 years, and reduces the interest and total paid by $65,736.37. Paying $300 extra per month reduces the number of monthly payments by 118, or 9.83 years, and reduces the interest and total paid by $85,805.87. That shortens the length of your mortgage by 1/3 and saves a bundle in interest.


Any extra charges should be identified on your bill. It may be an escrow amount that will go toward insurance and property taxes.Any extra charges should be identified on your bill. It may be an escrow amount that will go toward insurance and property taxes.Any extra charges should be identified on your bill. It may be an escrow amount that will go toward insurance and property taxes.Any extra charges should be identified on your bill. It may be an escrow amount that will go toward insurance and property taxes.


A debt repayment calculator shows how much money you can save by paying extra on your debt each month. Any extra money you put on your payment each month reduces the principle. By paying just a little extra each month, you can reduce the principle faster. This reduces the amount of interest you will owe in the coming months. Plugging in different amounts will help you see how much money you can save and must quicker your debt will be paid.


Do the math and see where the most benefit would be, considering the interest you would be paying. A larger down payment may make a difference in your house payment, allowing you to put more into your student loan. However, if you have extra money, it may be best to put some of it into a rainy day fund. Eventually, as a home owner, it will save you from borrowing money for a repair.


Extra money you pay back for the priveledge of borrowing it.


Mortgages are typically "front-loaded." That means the interest is paid more aggressively in the beginning of the life of the loan than the principal. As the loan matures, less of your payment is devoted to paying the interest on the loan and more is applied to your principal balance. It is important to mark extra payments as being toward the principal, otherwise your mortgage servicer may apply any extra payments as an additional monthly payment instead of reducing the principal.


The reason? That's how the banks make money on mortgages. The only way to pay it sooner is to add something extra every month toward the principal.The reason? That's how the banks make money on mortgages. The only way to pay it sooner is to add something extra every month toward the principal.The reason? That's how the banks make money on mortgages. The only way to pay it sooner is to add something extra every month toward the principal.The reason? That's how the banks make money on mortgages. The only way to pay it sooner is to add something extra every month toward the principal.


Be romantic toward him. Be extra nice, and make small moves.


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The biggest benefit to a free online checking account would be the no extra fees or requirements. Most online checking accounts are available without a minimum balance on the account, and other extra fees.


To pay off $128,000 in 5 years at 6.42% interest you would have to pay almost $30,000 a year ($29,996.08 if my calculations were right). Monthly payments would be $2499.68, so I suppose bimonthly would be $1,249.84. You did not say what your current payments are or if they are monthly, but you would have to specify that anything over your current payment would have to go to principal.


You don't make extra interest payments on a mortgage, you pay additional to lower your principal, which in turn lowers your interest cost. If you can afford it and don't have higher interest rate debt, then definitely yes. As an example, a 300,000 mortgage at 5% for 30 years, paying just $200 extra per month reduces the number of monthly payments by 78, or 6.50 years, and reduces the interest and total paid by $69,210.39. A significant cost savings to you.


It depends on the tenure. * For deposits that are less than one year the rate of interest is around 6-7% * For deposits that are one year or more the rate of Interest is around 8% * For special deposits that are 5 year tenure, the rate of interest is around 9% Add an extra 0.5% extra for senior citizens.



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