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Answered 2009-12-11 02:31:25

No. Only active transport.

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Passive transport doesn't require energy and that helps the cell.


No. Passive transport does not require the cell to use energy.


Passive transport is passive because it does not require any energy from the cell in order to occur.


The two types of cell trnsport it Passive Transport and Active Transport. Active Transport does require energy to move into and out of the cell. Passive Transport doesn't require energy to move into and out of the cell. Hope I helped!


Diffusion is a form of passive transport, and does not require energy input from a cell.


Diffusion is per definition a passive transport process.


It doesn't require the cell to expend energy.


Passive and active transport. Passive transport doesn't require the cell's energy, while active transport does.


This type of transport is generally called passive transport.


Passive transport refers to the movement of molecules across a cell membrane. An example of a sentence would be: "Passive transport does not require energy to work".


Energy is not required for passive transport.


Passive Transport,Facilitated Diffusion, and Simple Diffusion


Passive transport is the movement of molecules across the cell membrane and does not require energy. It is dependent on the permeability of the cell membrane. There are three main kinds of passive transport - Diffusion, Osmosis and Facilitated Diffusion.


Passive transport is useful to all cells because it does not require the use of a cell's energy; this is of much benefit to the cell and organism.



In active transport, the cell has to provide energy for it to occur. The cell doesn't have to provide energy for passive transport.


Yes it can. Passive transport, as the name suggests, does not require energy to take place hence it can occur in dead cells.


Facilitated diffusion is a type of passive transport which does not require the cell to expend energy.


No. Facilitated diffusion is an example of passive transport because it does not require the cell to expend energy.


One difference is energy consumption. Active transport requires the cell to expend energy, while passive transport does not. Active transport is movement from a lower concentration to a higher concentration and passive transport is movement from a higher concentration to a lower concentration. Active transport is the movement of molecules across a membrane requiring energy to be expended by the cell. Passive transport is diffusion across a membrane requiring only random motion of molecules with no energy expanded by the cell. Active transport requires ATP to transport materials. Passive transport does not require ATP input to transport materials. Ex: diffusion


no, but active transport on the other hand, does require transport proteins to transport the large molecules into the cell.


The difference between active and passive transport is that a active uses energy from the cell while a passive does not use energy from the cell


That would be passive transport. No energy required, as materials move from high to low pressure on their own. Active transport is the opposite, requiring energy from the cell itself.


There are two ways that the molecules (i.e: water) move through the membrane: passive transport and active transport. Active transport requires that the cell use energy that it has obtained from food to move the molecules (or larger particles) through the cell membrane. Passive transport does not require such an energy expenditure, and occurs spontaneously.


Active transport is when cells use energy to move things through a cell membrane.Passive transport is when the cell uses no energy to move materials.Active - Specifically uses energy and through a cell membranePassive - Specifically uses no energy and materials



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