Insurance
Medical Insurance

Does secondary insurance cover or pay copays of primary insurance?

343536

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2014-02-12 15:32:20
2014-02-12 15:32:20

The secondary insurance cover both pays and co-pays of the primary insurance depending with the insurance company.

001
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


Depending on your coverage, your primary insurance will cover 80% of your charges, minus your deductible (if not already met). Your secondary insurance will pick up the remaining 20% co-insurance and your co-pay, if you have one.


Primary insurance coverage is what is first used when a medical service is being rendered. This is what will be billed first. Secondary insurance is supposed to cover what the primary insurance does not.


As long as it is a covered expense by your secondary insurance and a claim has been filed with the primarty insurance then the answer is yes. The secondary insurance will only cover the expense according to your plan.


Put simply, yes, you can buy travel insurance or travel health insurance without primary insurance. That's just as well, as your primary insurance may not cover you (or cover you completely) when you travel overseas.


No, it's fraudulant. It's not practical, the secondary insurance should pay the remainder of the cost the primary insurance doesn't cover.


Supplemental Medical Insurance is in addition to your primary insurance. It is used to help cover the cost of copays, deductibles, and co-insurance. The most common time of SMI is Medicare Supplement Plan. It helps to cover what the medicare plan doesn't. If a person were to have Medicare Part A & B and also and AARP Supplement plan, it covers their copays for benefits and helps with covering costs of prescriptions.



What does the brochure or policy Evidence of Coverage for the secondary policy say?


It's secondary or tertiary insurance that is held to cover any medical expenses the primary insurance policy does not cover or does not cover completely.


Your secondary insurance has different PA criteria than your primary insurance. A PA means that your insurer will only cover a service under certain circumstances; company A may cover a service for 3 conditions and company B may only cover the same service for only 2 conditions. Your primary could pay and your secondary may not.



Their insurance would be primary and your insurance would be secondary, generally speaking.


The Primary is the first responsiblity of medical billing and if you have dual then the secondary will cover what the primary does not if not its out of pocket or Dudctible


Secondary medical insurance is a second level of insurance coverage.Under most circumstances, the two policies are independent of each other. One policy may pay for a service while the other may not. The primary policy must pay first, then the secondary. The choice of which policy is primary or secondary is established by a shared rule between insurance companies. It is not the policy holder's choice.Examples of Primary/Secondary coverage: A husband and wife both work and carry the medical insurance offered by their respective employers. The husband adds his wife to his policy. The wife adds her husband to her policy. Under most circumstances, the husband's plan would be his primary policy and his wife's plan would be his secondary policy. In like manner, the wife's plan would be her primary policy and her husband's plan would be her secondary policy.Secondary insurance should not be confused with supplemental insurance. Supplemental policies usually abide by the primary insurance guidelines. If the primary allows the charge, the supplemental will allow the charge. Most supplemental policies cover the charges you would normally pay out of pocket. For example: A Medicare supplemental policy would cover the 20% coinsurance left over after Medicare pays 80% of the allowed amount.


Depends on the doctors office billing procedures. For more details visit www.SteveShorr.com yes, your secondary insurance should cover this amount if you have reached your deductible with them. Normally, if the primary insurance applies a deductible or co-insurance/co-pay and you have not met your deductible on your secondary policy, depending on your policy they may apply the remaining balance to your deductible. Normally after the deductible is met on the secondary ins. they pay 100% of your remaining balance.


Yes they will have to accept payment from the secondary insurance, however they will have to bill the primary provider first. What ever the primary insurance does not cover should be covered by the secondary insurance. However, it will depend on the service being provided and the contracted amount that each insurance has agreed to pay. If the primary pays more than the secondary would have paid -there may be a refund due. However, there may be co-pays and deductibles to be met with both insurance policies. There could also be write downs--- you should only pay the lesser amount the provider may have to take a loss if one insurance has a lower contracted amount


Medicare C (Medicare Advantage or Medigap) is private insurance that you choose and pay for, to cover expenses not covered by Medicare A & B, such as copays, deductibles etc.


Not necessarily; a secondary insurance policy or plan might only provide additional benefits up to the maximum that it will pay for a specified service. If both plans have rates that are similar, this might result in a small additional payment. Some secondary insurance or health plans might pay up to their maximum -- in addition to what the primary pays, which would result in a higher payment against a claim.


It usually depends on the birthday of the parents, as to who's comes first in the year, That would be the primary and the other the secondary.


If you sign up for insurance with your company, You have to indicate who is primary subscriber between yourself and wife. If both a wife and a husband sign up with the same company and both have stated they are primary, Your wasting your money. In the insurance world, secondary insurance was purchased because you want coverage for medical cost and pharmacy cost your primary insurance does not cover. Birthdays having nothing to do with who is first. Indicating on the insurance form as subscriber does.


You could have two insurance companies pay the same medical bill or claim for a date of service through a process of subrogation where the first insurance company determined by the effective date of coverage will pay their portion of the bill and the second insurance company will pay the balance. This process is called coordination of benefits. Secondary medical insurance is a second level of insurance coverage. Under most circumstances, the two policies are independent of each other. One policy may pay for a service while the other may not. The primary policy must pay first, then the secondary. The choice of which policy is primary or secondary is established by a shared rule between insurance companies. It is not the policy holder's choice. Examples of Primary/Secondary coverage: A husband and wife both work and carry the medical insurance offered by their respective employers. The husband adds his wife to his policy. The wife adds her husband to her policy. Under most circumstances, the husband's plan would be his primary policy and his wife's plan would be his secondary policy. In like manner, the wife's plan would be her primary policy and her husband's plan would be her secondary policy. Secondary insurance should not be confused with supplemental insurance. Supplemental policies usually abide by the primary insurance guidelines. If the primary allows the charge, the supplemental will allow the charge. Most supplemental policies cover the charges you would normally pay out of pocket. For example: A Medicare supplemental policy would cover the 20% coinsurance left over after Medicare pays 80% of the allowed amount.


There are some supplemental insurances that will cover incidents that come up. You use the money as you see fit. Usually though, you are really saving money by taking an insurance that has a higher deductible/copay since the premiums are lower. We are so used to an all-encompassing insurance plan, but those are going by the wayside in the current (2010) market. Also, if you contribute to a health savings plan, that money is pre-tax and is cheaper to use for copays.


The answer to the question, is it depends. State laws on coordination of benefits (CoB) can impact the answer, but there is a general rule of thumb. If the dentist participates in a network that is connected to the patient's coverage--whether that coverage is primary or secondary, the participating network contractual relationship determines the amount that can be collected from the patient.Here's a table that was developed by the National Association of Dental Plans outlining various CoB scenarios and what determines the charges to patients under each.PATIENT COVERAGEWHAT THE DENTIST CHARGES THE PATIENTPrimary and secondary coverage are both DPPOs; Office participates in both network plans.The DPPO allowances of the primary plan.Primary coverage is a DPPO, and the secondary coverage is an indemnity plan.The DPPO allowances of the primary plan.Indemnity plan is primary, and the secondary coverage is a DPPO.The DPPO allowances of the secondary plan. Primary coverage is an DHMO, and the secondary is an indemnity plan.The DHMO patient co-payments. (The secondary indemnity plan may cover all or most of these co-payments.)Indemnity plan is primary, and the secondary coverage is an DHMO.The DHMO patient co-payments. (The primary indemnity plan may cover all or most of these co-payments.)Primary coverage is a DPPO, and an DHMO is the secondary plan.The DPPO allowances of the primary plan.Primary coverage is an DHMO, and the DPPO is the secondary plan.The DHMO patient co-payments. (The secondary DPPO plan may cover all or most of these co-payments.)NOTE: Discount dental plans are not subject to COB laws and regulations as they are not insurance products.


Your secondary insurance may not cover a pharmacy copay because it is not viewed as necessary or has not been approved. This is usually associated with premium medications or those which have a preferred drug over the prescribed medication.


Absolutely not. However your husbands policy would become your secondary insurance and you would hold your own primary insurance. Make sure you check with each insurance company to verify that the offer coordination of benefits on what is considered major work!



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.