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Answered 2009-03-18 12:13:07

at times yes but usually if the noncustodial parent does want to see the child they will be denied visitation rights and not be allowed to see the child

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... have to [pay] child support - yes, until/unless the child is adopted.


A noncustodial parent cannot sign his rights over to his parents or voluntarily terminate his parental rights. He needs the permission of the court and the custodial parent.




If there is no court mandated agreement that ensures the noncustodial parent visitation rights, then yes they can.



Yes, if the court allows him too. He will still have to pay child support.


Unless visitation rights for the non-custodial parent were allowed in the divorce paperwork, the custodial parent is completely within their rights to deny the non-custodial parent visitation....however, the non-custodial parent may sue for visitation rights.


Courts usually only allows parent to give up parental rights if the child is being adopted. But if they would allow her, it would be for the custodial parent to decide whether they would need child support or not. If they need support from the state the state will go after the mother first.


the custodial parent is the parent the child lives with the non custodial parent is the parent the child does NOT live with the non custodial parent assuming he / she knows he is a parent... is usually the patitioning parent. if he /she chooses not to seek visitation rights the court cannot force him/ her to see the child.... but they can enforce child support. research the laws for your state.



it shouldnt matter. if the parent has custidy and the other dont and there is no visitation rights then then yes the perant can move


A parent has visitation rights unless the Judge orders otherwise.If the offending parent gets arrested and convicted the custodial parent can file in court and POSSIBLY have the visitation rights revoked.



With court approval and provided welfare is not involved. see links



None unless the custodial parent agrees to visitation. Stepparents have no rights concerning a non-biological child unless the court grants them guardianship.


A procedure for voluntary termination of the parent-child relationship is initiated when a child placing agency or the office of family and children accepts the parent's consent to the termination of the parent-child relationship and files the necessary petition with the juvenile court. A parent does not have the authority to file directly for termination of his/her parental rights because a parent has the duty to support and care for the child until the child is emancipated. And as such, terminating parental rights may not and often does not terminate obligation to pay child support unless the child is being adopted.



ill answer this with another question, should a parent loose rights that doesn't pay support in the first place.


Not without the permission of the courts and the mother, AND provided the mother is not, nor will in the future, collect AFDC.


Have your attorney issue a document subpeona to the carrier to get proof of the coverage. Can you still subpeona if the rights of the noncustodial parent have been recently terminated? The information requested would only be during the time frame that rights were effective to prove that the custodial parent had insurance coverage that she failed to relay to domestic relations.



Some options to consider: The primary way to avoid child support is to be diligent about contraception. Do not have children you do not want to support. If the child is adopted by another adult who is willing to step in as parent the non-custodial parent can give up their parental rights. The specific arrangements for child support are initially set by the court and can be later modified by the court. Avoiding the obligation entirely is probably not going to happen, but if you are in severe hardship you may be able to get the amount of support reduced.


Then they should go to court for child abandonment and have his parental rights removed. Until then he can still make you come back.



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