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Answered 2015-03-07 16:07:42

There is no evidence that HPV vaccine causes Cervical cancer. Because the vaccine doesn't contain live virus, it can't cause HPV disease.

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HPV is the infection that puts women at risk for cervical cancer. The vaccine against cervical cancer lowers the risk significantly.


Yes, the HPV vaccine lower the risk of cervical cancer. It's not likely to prevent 100%, so women still need cervical cancer screening (Pap smears) after having the HPV vaccine.


Cervical cancer is typically caused by HPV. Studies have shown some 70% of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer are caused by HPV.The Human Papilloma Virus can cause cervical cancer in women if it is left untreated.human paillomavirus(hpv)


Cervical cancer will continue to decline with increased adoption of the HPV vaccine. In addition, more targeted screening for HPV-related cervical dysplasia is making it easier to identify high-risk women.


Your mom's sister having cervical cancer has no relevance to you getting cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is caused by a sexually transmitted virus called HPV. This is a very common virus (infecting roughly 40% of women under 30) and can be treated and prevented from becoming cervical cancer if regular pap exams are performed.




Women die from cervical cancer.


11,818 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2011


African-American and Hispanic women have a higher rate of cervical cancer-related death.


Minority women and women of low socioeconomic status have higher rates of cervical cancer and an increased mortality rate.


Smoking may double the risk of cervical cancer. In fact, studies suggest that nearly 50% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer smoke


The number 1 cause of cervical cancer in women is infection of the HPV (genital wart) virus.


The HPV vaccine is a recently developed vaccine that protects young women against human papilloma virus, a type of virus that is responsible for genital warts, cervical cancer and other types of genital cancer. HPV is a sexually transmitted virus. There are many different strains of HPV, some of which are more likely to cause genital warts and some of which are more likely to cause cervical cancer. HPV is often asymptomatic in infected men and women, so people may not know that they are passing the disease on to their sexual partners. The HPV vaccine is designed to prevent cases of cervical cancer from cancer-causing strains, but some vaccine formulations also protect against the strains that cause genital warts.Demographics For the HPV VaccineThe vaccine for human papilloma virus is ideally given to young women before they become sexually active. The ideal age to give the HPV vaccine is 11 or 12 years old, but the vaccine can be given to women who are between the ages of 9 and 26. The HPV vaccine is not given to pregnant women of any age at this time.How is the HPV Vaccine Given?The HPV vaccine is given as a series of three injections, with one injection given every two months. It is important to receive the entire series of injections for optimum protection, because it is not known how much protection against HPV is gained from one or two injections, although the protection gained is probably better than nothing.Safety and Efficacy of the VaccineThe HPV vaccine is safe and effective at preventing HPV-related cervical cancer caused by certain prevalent strains of HPV. The vaccine prevents HPV infection with certain strains, but it does not treat infections that have already occurred. The available scientific data suggests that the immunity to HPV conferred by the vaccine does not decrease over time, so the vaccine series should be enough to protect a woman against HPV for the long term. The HPV vaccine does not protect against all possible strains of HPV, but it protects against the ones most common and most likely to cause cervical cancer.


breast cancer and ovarian cancer are common in women, however cervical cancer can also occur frequently.


The American Cancer Society estimated that in 2013, approximately 12,340 women would be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix and 4,030 women would die of the disease. Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. However, in the past 40 years, the number of cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths from cervical cancer have decreased significantly. This decline largely is the result of many women getting regular Pap tests, which can find cervical pre-cancer before it turns into cancer. In 2008: New cases: 11,070 Deaths: 3,870


Women are at greatest risk of developing cervical cancer between the ages of 30 and 40 and between the ages of 50 and 60.


What is cervical cancer?The cervix is the female hormone that connects the uterus to the vagina. Cancer occurs when the cells in the cervix begin to grow and divide abnormally. It is caused by the human papillomavirus or HPV. Women who have had many sexual partners or had sex before the age of 18 are at the greatest risk for developing cervical cancer. Additionally, cervical cancer is more common in women who have a weakened immune system.What are some of the symptoms of cervical cancer?Most women will not notice any symptoms during the early stages of cervical cancer. Bloody discharge and pelvic pain are signs of advanced cervical cancer. Women who have any symptom that concerns them should not hesitate to see their doctors.What are some of the treatment options for cervical cancer?If a patient is in the early stage of cervical cancer, the doctor will elect to perform an hysterectomy. A hysterectomy is a procedure that removes the uterus. If a woman is found to be in the advanced stage of cervical cancer, the doctor will order radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Radiation therapy uses energy to kill the cancerous cells. Chemotherapy uses drugs to get rid of the cancer.What can be done to prevent cervical cancer?One of the best things that women can do to prevent cervical cancer is get pap smears regularly. Women who are between the ages of 21 and 30 should get a pap smear at least once every two years. A woman should get a pap smear at least every three years after her 30th birthday.Doctors also recommend that women and girls who are between the ages of 9 and 26 get the Gardasil shot. This vaccination helps protect against some of the most dangerous types of HPV. Additionally, women should limit the number of sexual partners that they have.


* During 2004-2005, 61% of women aged 20-69 years had a Pap test. * 212 Australian women died of cervical cancer in 2004. * 725 Australian women were diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2003. * Cervical screening began in Australia on an ad hoc basis in the 1960s. Australia's cervical screening program began as a structured program in 1991.


Although it is the most preventable type of cancer, each year cervical cancer kills about 4,000 women in the U.S. and about 300,000 women worldwide. In the United States, cervical cancer mortality rates plunged by 74% from 1955 - 1992 thanks to increased screening and early detection with the Pap test


Yes. Vaccination for HPV can reduce the risk of HPV (Human papiloma virus) infection, genital warts, and cervical cancer in women and penile and rectal cancer in men. The HPV vaccine Gardasil was first recommended for use in women, but it is not recommended for use in males and females to further reduce the incidence HPV, genital warts, cervical cancer, penile cancer, and rectal cancer. Ideally, the vaccine should be given to girls and boys before adolescence, usually between ages 9 and 13, because the vaccine must be given before HPV exposure. Just as boys and girls are routinely immunized for measles, mumps, rubella, polio, tetanus, hepatitus A and B, diphtheria, pertussis, meningitis, and chicken pox, they should also be routinely vaccinated for HPV, which protects them from HPV infection, genital warts, and cervical, penile, and rectal cancers caused by HPV.


Yes. Vaccination for HPV can reduce the risk of HPV (Human papiloma virus) infection, genital warts, and cervical cancer in women and penile and rectal cancer in men. The HPV vaccine Gardasil was first recommended for use in women, but it is not recommended for use in males and females to further reduce the incidence HPV, genital warts, cervical cancer, penile cancer, and rectal cancer. Ideally, the vaccine should be given to girls and boys before adolescence, usually between ages 9 and 13, because the vaccine must be given before HPV exposure. Just as boys and girls are routinely immunized for measles, mumps, rubella, polio, tetanus, hepatitus A and B, diphtheria, pertussis, meningitis, and chicken pox, they should also be routinely vaccinated for HPV, which protects them from HPV infection, genital warts, and cervical, penile, and rectal cancers caused by HPV.


The major risk of HPV is the increased risk of cervical cancer in women, and this is caused by two strains in particular. Less common, but possible in both men and women, is HPV-caused cancer developing inside/outside the genital region, in the anus, and also in the mouth.


i think it is to stop cervical cancer


In the United States, cervical cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women aged 35-54, and the third most common cancer of the female reproductive tract.



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