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Anonymous
Answered 2021-01-12 18:51:46

y si no quiero

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Anonymous
2021-01-12 18:52:36
si verdadย 

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Anonymous
Answered 2021-01-12 18:50:40

no esas enfadoso

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Anonymous
2021-01-12 18:51:17
deja a aleย 

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Anonymous
Answered 2021-01-12 18:52:20

dejen a ale y punto

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Anonymous
2021-01-12 18:53:02
si verdad \

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Anonymous
Answered 2021-01-12 18:50:15

your anser is popo

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Related Questions


A hurricane will not form over cold ocean water, that is why hurricanes rarely form in the winter; the ocean is usually too cold. However, you cannot simply cool ocean water like that. The amount of energy stored in the water making it warm is enormous, to great for us to ever hope to manipulate.


Hurricanes get the energy they need from the moisture that evaporates from warm ocean water. Without this energy source a hurricane weakens and dissipates.


Hurricanes form over the ocean and when the water and air is warm or hot.


No. Hurricanes can only form over warm ocean water.


Yes. Hurricanes form over warm ocean water.


The temperature of the ocean must be 80 degrees or 26 celsius in order for a hurricane, typhoon or a cyclone form.


The water temperature to begin a hurricane is about 80 degrees F.


Hurricanes form over warm ocean water.


Hurricanes can only develop over warm ocean water. Tornadoes can form on water but usually form on land.


Hurricane form over warm ocean water in or near the tropics.


Hurricane Floyd developed over the Atlantic Ocean.


Hurricanes form over warm ocean water, nearly always in the tropics.


No. Hurricanes can only form over warm ocean water, and Chicago is too far from the ocean to get them.


Ocean waves are form cause of the wind, or earthquakes. It forms when energy is transferred from a source to the ocean water.


Hurricanes form over warm water because it warms and moistens the air above it. This warm, moist ocean air is essentially the fuel of a hurricane. When a tropical disturbance, the precursor to a hurricane, lifts this air it cools and the moisture in it condenses, releasing enormous amounts of energy.


Yes. In fact hurricanes form over the ocean when temperature inversions occur.


Yes. Hurricanes develop in warm tropical waters.


Nothing. Hurricanes are weather events. They form from storms gaining energy over warm ocean water. They have absolutely nothing to do with plate tectonics.


Hurricanes are formed by the evaporation of moisture from the ocean and return water to the surface in the form of rain.


No. A hurricane cannot form on the Great Lakes. Unlike tornadoes, which can occur almost anywhere, hurricane requires large amounts of warm water to form. In other words, they can only form over ocean water in or near the tropics. The Great Lakes are too cold and too small to support a hurricane.


Hurricanes form over tropical ocean water and weak rapidly to below hurricane strength if they hit land. Chicago is too far from the ocean for a hurricane to reach it.


Hurricanes get their energy from moisture that evaporates from warm ocean water. Warm, moist air holds enormous amounts of energy. This air is drawn into a hurricane and the moisture condenses to form clouds, releasing its energy in the process to power the storm.


hurricane form due to the evaporation of the warm ocean and the Autumn winds and the form over the ocean


Hurricanes require warm ocean water to form. The Arctic Ocean is very cold and is partially frozen over and thus cannot provide the warmth or moisture necessary. So it's not just unlikely for a hurricane to form in the Arctic; it's impossible.


Any one of these can form over the ocean, but only a hurricane does so exclusively.



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