answersLogoWhite
Ask
Baseball
Baseball History
Baseball Rules and Regulations

How can nine batters face a pitcher in one inning have three outs and not score a run?

454647
Answer

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
2015-07-15 18:33:35
2015-07-15 18:33:35

However improbable it can be done through a combination of rain delays, traded players, batting out of order, bases loaded HR in which appeal for batter not having touched first base would negate all other runners etc...

Unless you're pinch hitting for people in the middle of their at-bats (which to me is cheating for the purposes of this question), it's impossible. The maximum number of batters you can send to the plate in an inning without scoring is six.

1
0

Related Questions

User Avatar

The maximum batters to come to the plate without scoring a run is six. First three batters get on base. Fourth batter strikes out, as does the fifth batter and the sixth batter flys out to end the inning. Zero runs score. The minimum runs scored for nine batters in an inning would be three.

User Avatar

the "side" is the term used for that teams part of the inning. so when they say striking out the side that means they struck out every batter in that part of the inning.

User Avatar

No he does not. You must enter the game with the score being within 3 runs of the other team. But if the pitcher pitches three innings without giving up the lead, (after the starter) then he is awarded the save as well. example: 1-0, 5-2, 9-8

User Avatar

There have been three pitchers to strikeout 20 batters in one game and one pitcher to strikeout 21 batters in a game. The three to strikeout 20 were Kerry Wood, Roger Clemens, and Randy Johnson. All three struckout all those batters in a nine inning game. The pitcher to strikeout 21 batters, Tom Cheney, needed 16 innings. Cheney's 21 strikeouts is the MLB record for strikeouts by a pitcher in a single game.


Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.