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How can you tell the difference between a Carson City Morgan silver dollar and a Morgan dollar?

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2009-06-26 19:04:50
2009-06-26 19:04:50

A "Carson City Morgan Dollar" is simply a Morgan dollar produced at the Carson City, Nevada, mint. Such a coin can be identified by the mintmark "CC" on the reverse of the coin, beneath the tail feathers of the eagle.

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Please post a new and rephrased question. You're asking if a Carson City dollar is a Carson City dollar, which is of course ALWAYS true.


One group is a subset of the other. "Morgan dollar" refers to the design by George T. Morgan that was issued from 1878 to 1904 and again in 1921. Carson City refers to one of the mints where dollars were struck. The Carson City mint operated from about 1870 to 1893, and it struck Seated Liberty design dollars, Trade dollars, and Morgan design dollars. The Morgan design was also minted at Philadelphia, San Francisco, New Orleans, and Denver. So ... a Morgan Carson City dollar is one that was struck between 1878 and 1893 at the Carson City Mint. But not all Morgan dollars were struck at Carson City, and not all dollars struck at Carson City are Morgans. (see Venn diagrams in high school math!)


A Morgan dollar IS a silver dollar. The term Morgan refers to the designer George T. Morgan who created the images used from 1878 to 1904 and in 1921.


No, 1893 was the last date that Carson City minted Morgan Dollars.


An uncirculated Carson City Morgan dollar is worth around $700.00


There's no difference. All silver dollars minted in 1894 used the Morgan design, named for the famous designer George T. Morgan.


A 1885-CC Morgan Dollar in good condition is worth: $450.00.


If you have a 1895 Morgan with a Carson-City mintmark it's fake. 1893 was the last CC Morgan dollar.


No such thing. The Carson City Mint didn't open until 1870, and the Morgan dollar wasn't introduced until 1878.


Sorry no Carson City mint marks in 1887 on a Morgan dollar. Look at the coin again.


The 1921 Chapman was a proof version of the Morgan Dollar. Very few were minted and because of this, they command a premium price.


The first Morgan dollars were struck in 1878 at Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Carson City.


There is no difference. They are the same coin but many people refer to them as "Liberty Dollars".


The value of 1889 Morgan silver dollar replica ranges from $23.01 to $26.76


The 1890 Morgan was struck at all 4 Mints. So if it was made at the Carson-City Mint the mintmark is on the reverse, under the DO in DOLLAR.


It will have "CC" in the mint mark position, on the reverse side above the DO in DOLLAR.


The 1901 Morgan with no mintmark is worth more than the one with the "O" mintmark, but the difference depends on the condition (grade) of the coins. A 1901-O Morgan in the grade of EF-40 has an average value of $29.00 A 1901 Philadelphia (no mintmark) Morgan in the same grade is $105.00.


Average retail is $200.00 it's the most common Mint state Carson City Morgan Dollar.


Look at the date and mintmark again, the last Carson City Morgan was struck in 1893.


Carson City (CC) Morgan dollars are the most valuable, but all Morgans have some value.


It is quite easy, the reverse of peace dollars have an eagle sitting on a rock inscribed "PEACE", the reverse of Morgan dollars have an eagle with olive branches and arrows.


Carson City Morgan dollars were issued for many years. Each coin has its own value based upon the year it was minted and the condition of the coin.


1893 was the last year a Morgan dollar was struck at the Carson-City Mint. Look at the coin again and post new question.


There were no silver dollars struck at Carson City in 1887. Any 1887 dollar with a CC mint mark is a counterfeit.


If it has the CC mintmark it means it was made at the Carson City mint.



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