answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
abbynormal
Answered
2020-09-08 19:32:46
2020-09-08 19:32:46

He ignored the Court's ruling (Apex)

012
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions




In 1972, three cases, Branch v. Georgia, Furman v. Georgia and Jackson v. Georgia were all brought before the Supreme Court. A decision was issued collectively under Furman v. Georgia that ruled that current death penalty statutes were unconstitutional under the eighth amendment.


Supporting the supreme court decision in the Georgia cases



In response to the Supreme Court's ruling in Worcester v Georgia that Georgia had no right to interfere with the Cherokee, President Jackson disregarded the decision and removal of the Cherokee proceeded as planned.


1. Cherokee fight for the United States in the War of 18122. The Supreme Court says Georgia Indian laws are unconstitutional3. Jackson supp0rts the Indian Removal Act with force(Apex)


In the court case Worcester v. Georgia, Marshall ruled that Jackson's Indian Removal Act was unconstitutional and that he should abolish it immediately. Jackson said, "John Marshall has made his decision; now let him enforce it!" and completely ignored Marshall's orders. This caused hatred between the two men.


Jackson took no action to make Georgia follow the ruling. By not enforcing the courts decision , Jackson violated his presidential oath to uphold the laws of the land.


Andrew Jackson thought that the bank was unconstitutional because he believed that only states not federal government had the right to charter banks


Jacksons response: "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it."



"The decision of the Supreme Court has fell still born, and they find that they cannot coerce Georgia to yield to its mandate.." -apeX:


The area of Lake Jackson - Georgia - is 19.223 square kilometers.


1; Gold Is Discovered In Georgia 2; The Supreme Coury Says Georgia Indian Laws Are Unconstitutional 3; Jackson Supports The Indian Removal Act With Force - Apexx :)


He believed the national bank was unconstitutional.


Andrew Jackson never said those words.The quote is a romanticized myth arising from the ruling in Worcester v. Georgia, 31 US 515 (1832), in which the Supreme Court, under the leadership of John Marshall, declared Native Americans had a right to federal protection against enforcement of unconstitutional state laws.President Jackson never said, "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it!" In Paul Boller's book, They Never Said It: A Book of False Quotes, Misquotes, & False Attributions, historian Robert V. Remini explains Jackson wrote in a letter to John Coffee, "...the decision of the Supreme Court has fell still born, and they find that they cannot coerce Georgia to yield to its mandate," meaning the Court's opinion was moot because it had no power to enforce its edict (not being a legislative body).In fact, Georgia did obey the Supreme Court's only substantive ruling, which ordered the release from jail of missionaries who had lived on Native American land without buying a required state license. Since Georgia complied, there was nothing to enforce.President Jackson and Congress opposed the Court's developing support of Native American rights, which they later demonstrated by seizing Native American land and displacing its inhabitants in the "Trail of Tears" tragedy.==================================================sumarized: Andrew Jackson's infamous quote about John Marshall was in reaction to the Supreme Court's decision in Worcester v. Georgia. In this 1832 case, John Marshall and the Supreme Court ruled that Georgia could not impose its laws on Cherokee triballands.


AnswerThat quote is a romanticized myth arising from the ruling in Worcester v. Georgia, 31 US 515 (1832), in which the Supreme Court, under the leadership of John Marshall, declared Native Americans had a right to federal protection against enforcement of unconstitutional state laws.President Jackson never said, "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it!" In Paul Boller's book, They Never Said It: A Book of False Quotes, Misquotes, & False Attributions, historian Robert V. Remini explains Jackson wrote in a letter to John Coffee, "...the decision of the Supreme Court has fell still born, and they find that they cannot coerce Georgia to yield to its mandate," meaning the Court's opinion was moot because it had no power to enforce its edict (not being a legislative body).In fact, Georgia did obey the Supreme Court's only substantive ruling, which ordered the release from jail of missionaries who had lived on Native American land without buying a required state license. Since Georgia complied, there was nothing to enforce.President Jackson and Congress opposed the Court's developing support of Native American rights, which they later demonstrated by seizing Native American land and displacing its inhabitants in the "Trail of Tears" tragedy.


Jackson declared war on the second bank of the US because Jackson believed to be corrupt. Jackson declared war on Biddle and the bank. But Biddle felt sure of his political power.


Stonewell Jackson thought Dred Scott Decision was a supid idea


He felt that it was unconstitutional and that it favored the wealthy.



The Indian removal act. Jackson supported the Indian Removal Act, but the Supreme Court did not oppose it. There was a case (Worcester v. Georgia) about a Georgia law making it illegal for non-Indians to live in Indian territory and a white missionary, Samuel Worcester, was arrested for violating the law. The Court ruled that Indian tribes were foreign nations and only the federal government could deal with them and their lands and so the Georgia law was unconstitutional. Jackson did not like the ruling, but the court did not ask Jackson or federal marshals to enforce its ruling. Eventually the Georgia state authorities released Worcester from custody.


According to popular myth, Jackson was supposed to have said, "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it!" In Paul Boller's book, They Never Said It: A Book of False Quotes, Misquotes, & False Attributions, historian Robert V. Remini claims Jackson never made such a statement. The tale is based on something Jackson wrote in a letter to John Coffee, "...the decision of the Supreme Court has fell still born, and they find that they cannot coerce Georgia to yield to its mandate,"meaning the Court's opinion was moot because it had no power to enforce its edict (not being a legislative body).




Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.