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Ancient History

How did the religion of Abraham break into the three Abrahamic religions of today?

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Wiki User
2013-08-29 19:13:12

According to the bible, from what i remember, there was two

brothers who fought and then one's son also fought and the

separated each taking their own religion.

Answer:

there are 3 abrahamic religions and you said 2 sons so that

doesnt really answer the question but the reason we have 3

abrahamic beliefs is because the abrahamic belief is monotheism and

all 3 are truly monotheistic and all 3 believe in the prophets and

1 god they just differ from there

Jewish Answer:

Allow me to refresh your memory (first answerer above).

Abraham was the founder of monotheism as it has taken root since

his time and thanks to his efforts.

Abraham's two sons Isaac and Ishmael (see Genesis ch.17 and 21)

carried on after him (the other six sons, in Genesis ch.25, were

relegated to a lesser role [ibid.] and founded no distinct

teachings).

Isaac continued with Abraham's teachings, while Ishmael went on

to father the Arab nations, who later received Islam from

Muhammad.

Isaac had two sons (they were the ones whom you mentioned as

fighting. Genesis ch.25). They were given the names Jacob and

Esau.

Jacob, who received also the name of Israel (Genesis ch.35), was

the father of the Israelite tribes (Genesis ch.29-30), from whom

the Jewish people are descended.

Esau settled in the land of Edom (Genesis ch.35). Later, some of

his descendants resettled in Italy (Rashi commentary, Genesis

ch.27) and became the ancestors of the patrician class in Rome, who

accepted Christianity in the time of Constantine. Christianity had

been founded by Jesus, whose disciples taught their pagan converts

to reject idolatry and accept belief in God, which is an Abrahamic

teaching.


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